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  1. Mark Sheehan, Claire Timlin, Ken Peach, Ariella Binik, Wilson Puthenparampil, Mark Lodge, Sean Kehoe, Michael Brada, Neil Burnet, Steve Clarke, Adrian Crellin, Michael Dunn, Piero Fossati, Steve Harris, Michael Hocken, Tony Hope, Jonathan Ives, Tadashi Kamada, Alex John London, Robert Miller, Michael Parker, Madelon Pijls-Johannesma, Julian Savulescu, Susan Short, Loane Skene, Hirohiko Tsujii, Jeffrey Tuan & Charles Weijer (forthcoming). Position Statement on Ethics, Equipoise and Research on Charged Particle Radiation Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101290.
    The use of charged-particle radiation therapy (CPRT) is an increasingly important development in the treatment of cancer. One of the most pressing controversies about the use of this technology is whether randomised controlled trials are required before this form of treatment can be considered to be the treatment of choice for a wide range of indications. Equipoise is the key ethical concept in determining which research studies are justified. However, there is a good deal of disagreement about how this concept (...)
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  2. Jonathan Ives (2014). A Method of Reflexive Balancing in a Pragmatic, Interdisciplinary and Reflexive Bioethics. Bioethics 28 (6):302-312.
    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an ‘abstract’ philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of ‘empirical’ (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but (...)
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  3. Jonathan Ives, John Owens & Alan Cribb (2013). IEEN Workshop Report: Teaching and Learning in Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics. Clinical Ethics 8 (2-3):70-74.
    Bioethics is an interdisciplinary field that accommodates a broad range of perspectives and disciplines. This inherent diversity sets a number of challenges for both teachers and students of bioethics, notably in respect to the appropriate aims and methods of bioethics education, standards and criteria for evaluating performance and disciplinary identity. The Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network (IEEN) was established, with funding from the Wellcome Trust, to facilitate critical and constructive discussion about the ongoing development of bioethics as an evolving field (...)
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  4. Jonathan Ives & Michael Dunn (2010). Who's Arguing? A Call for Reflexivity in Bioethics. Bioethics 24 (5):256-265.
    In this paper we set forth what we believe to be a relatively controversial argument, claiming that 'bioethics' needs to undergo a fundamental change in the way it is practised. This change, we argue, requires philosophical bioethicists to adopt reflexive practices when applying their analyses in public forums, acknowledging openly that bioethics is an embedded socio-cultural practice, shaped by the ever-changing intuitions of individual philosophers, which cannot be viewed as a detached intellectual endeavour. This said, we argue that in order (...)
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  5. Michael Dunn & Jonathan Ives (2009). Methodology, Epistemology, and Empirical Bioethics Research: A Constructive/Ist Commentary. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6):93-95.
  6. Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper (2009). Appropriate Methodologies for Empirical Bioethics: It's All Relative. Bioethics 23 (4):249-258.
    In this article we distinguish between philosophical bioethics (PB), descriptive policy orientated bioethics (DPOB) and normative policy oriented bioethics (NPOB). We argue that finding an appropriate methodology for combining empirical data and moral theory depends on what the aims of the research endeavour are, and that, for the most part, this combination is only required for NPOB. After briefly discussing the debate around the is/ought problem, and suggesting that both sides of this debate are misunderstanding one another (i.e. one side (...)
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  7. Tom Sorell, Heather Draper, Sarah Damery & Jonathan Ives (2009). “Dunkirk Spirit:” Differences Between United Kingdom and United States Responses to Pandemic Influenza. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):21-22.
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  8. Michael C. Dunn, Zeynep Gurtin-Broadbent, Jessica R. Wheeler & Jonathan Ives (2008). Jack of All Trades, Master of None? Challenges Facing Junior Academic Researchers in Bioethics. Clinical Ethics 3 (4):160-163.
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  9. Jonathan Ives (2008). Does a Belief in God Lead to Moral Cowardice?: The Difference Between Courage of Moral Conviction and Acquisition. Think 7 (20):57-68.
    In our seventh and final piece on the theme , Jonathan Ives argues that reliance on God as an external source of moral authority leads to a kind of moral cowardice.
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  10. Jonathan Ives (2008). 'Encounters with Experience': Empirical Bioethics and the Future. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (1):1-6.
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  11. Anna Smajdor, Jonathan Ives, Emma Baldock & Adele Langlois (2008). Getting From the Ethical to the Empirical and Back Again: The Danger of Getting It Wrong, and the Possibilities for Getting It Right. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (1):7-16.
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  12. Jonathan Ives (2007). L.I.F.E. And D.E.A.T.H. Health Care Analysis 15 (3):257-259.
    In this short, rhetorical article, I offer a thought experiment that seeks to make an analogy between ‘life’ and ‘disease’. This article was written whilst under the influence of Nietzsche, and I hope that readers will not mistake the polemical style and the occasional nod towards humour for flippancy. This is a serious subject, and this article attempts to ask, inexplicitly, a serious question. If we do suspend our subjective value judgements about life, and strip away what might be considered (...)
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