Search results for 'Physician's Role' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. S. J. Booij, D. P. Engberts, V. Rodig, A. Tibben & R. A. C. Roos (2013). A Plea for End-of-Life Discussions with Patients Suffering From Huntington's Disease: The Role of the Physician. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):621-624.score: 495.0
    Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) by request and/or based on an advance directive are legal in The Netherlands under strict conditions, thus providing options for patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative diseases to stay in control and choose their end of life. HD is an inherited progressive disease characterised by chorea and hypokinesia, psychiatric symptoms and dementia. From a qualitative study based on interviews with 15 physicians experienced in treating HD, several ethical issues emerged. Consideration of these aspects (...)
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  2. Professor John R. Williams (2006). The Physician's Role in the Protection of Human Research Subjects. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):5-12.score: 477.0
    Responsibility for the protection of human research subjects is shared by investigators, research ethics committees, sponsors/funders, research institutions, governments and, the focus of this article, physicians who enrol patients in clinical trials. The article describes the general principles of the patient-physician relationship that should regulate the participation of physicians in clinical trials and proposes guidelines for determining when and how such participation should proceed. The guidelines deal with the following stages of the trial: when first considering participation, when deciding whether (...)
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  3. N. S. Wenger & J. Halpern (1994). The Physician's Role in Completing Advance Directives: Ensuring Patients' Capacity to Make Healthcare Decisions in Advance. Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (4):320.score: 459.0
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  4. Eli Feen (2011). Continuous Deep Sedation: Consistent With Physician's Role as Healer. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):49 - 51.score: 450.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 49-51, June 2011.
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  5. John R. Williams (2006). The Physician's Role in the Protection of Human Research Subjects. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):5-12.score: 450.0
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  6. Daniel Kim, Kristin Schleiter, Bette-Jane Crigger, John W. McMahon, Regina M. Benjamin & Sharon P. Douglas (2010). A Physician's Role Following a Breach of Electronic Health Information. Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (1):30.score: 450.0
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  7. Chalmers C. Clark (2003). The Physician's Role, "Sham Surgery," and Trust: A Conflict of Duties? American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):57-58.score: 450.0
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  8. Sharon Lee (1998). The Physician's Role in Protecting Confidentiality--A Consideration of the Implications of AIDS. Bioethics Forum 14 (3-4):18.score: 450.0
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  9. Thomas Warr (1998). The Physician's Role in Maintaining Hope and Spirituality. Bioethics Forum 15 (1):31-37.score: 450.0
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  10. F. D. Ledley (1990). The Physician-Scientist's Role in Medical Research and the Mythology of Intellectual Tradition. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (3):410-420.score: 435.0
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  11. J. Snyder, V. A. Crooks, K. Adams, P. Kingsbury & R. Johnston (2011). The 'Patient's Physician One-Step Removed': The Evolving Roles of Medical Tourism Facilitators. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):530-534.score: 306.0
    Background: Medical tourism involves patients travelling internationally to receive medical services. This practice raises a range of ethical issues, including potential harms to the patient's home and destination country and risks to the patient's own health. Medical tourists often engage the services of a facilitator who may book travel and accommodation and link the patient with a hospital abroad. Facilitators have the potential to exacerbate or mitigate the ethical concerns associated with medical tourism, but their roles are poorly understood. -/- (...)
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  12. Laurence B. McCullough (2004). The Nature and Limits of the Physician's Professional Responsibilities: Surgical Ethics, Matters of Conscience, and Managed Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):3 – 9.score: 297.0
    The nature and limits of the physician's professional responsibilities constitute core topics in clinical ethics. These responsibilities originate in the physician's professional role, which was first examined in the modern English-language literature of medical ethics by two eighteenth-century British physician-ethicists, John Gregory and Thomas Percival. The papers in this annual clinical ethics number of the Journal explore the physician's professional responsibilities in the areas of surgical ethics, matters of conscience, and managed care.
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  13. Andrea F. Patenaude, Joel M. Rappeport & Brian R. Smith (1986). The Physician's Influence on Informed Consent for Bone Marrow Transplantation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (2).score: 297.0
    The influence of physician judgment on the disclosure, competency, understanding, voluntariness, and decision aspects of informed consent for bone marrow transplantation are described. Ethical conflicts which arise from the amount and complexity of the information to be disclosed and from the barriers of limited time, patient anxiety and lack of prior relationship between patient and physician are discussed. The role of the referring physician in the decision-making is considered. Special ethical issues which arise with use of healthy related bone (...)
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  14. Patrick Grüneberg (2012). From Therapy and Enhancement to Assistive Technologies: An Attempt to Clarify the Role of the Sports Physician. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (4):480-491.score: 267.0
    Sports physicians are continuously confronted with new biotechnological innovations. This applies not only to doping in sports, but to all kinds of so-called enhancement methods. One fundamental problem regarding the sports physician's self-image consists in a blurred distinction between therapeutic treatment and non-therapeutic performance enhancement. After a brief inventory of the sports physician's work environment I reject as insufficient the attempts to resolve the conflict of the sports physician by making it a classificatory problem. Followed by a critical (...)
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  15. Gordon R. Mitchell & Kathleen M. McTigue (2012). Translation Through Argumentation in Medical Research and Physician-Citizenship. Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):83-107.score: 261.0
    While many "benchtop-to-bedside" research pathways have been developed in "Type I" translational medicine, vehicles to facilitate "Type II" and "Type III" translation that convert scientific data into clinical and community interventions designed to improve the health of human populations remain elusive. Further, while a high percentage of physicians endorse the principle of citizen leadership, many have difficulty practicing it. This discrepancy has been attributed, in part, to lack of training and preparation for public advocacy, time limitation, and institutional resistance. As (...)
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  16. Charles J. Bussey & Donna Bussey (1991). The Physician and Social Renewal: Julius B. Richmond as Role Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 12 (1):25-34.score: 261.0
    We live in an age of “high tech” medicine which affects both health care recipients and physicians who are taught its many wonders and uses. It is easy in this atmosphere of specialization for clinicians, professors and medical students to become isolated and to ignore social issues which affect health care in its broadest sense.Individuals who are committed to the “common good” are the ones historically who have been effective change agents. It would be tragic simply to stand back and (...)
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  17. Christopher M. Burkle, Paul S. Mueller, Keith M. Swetz, C. Hook & Mark T. Keegan (2012). Physician Perspectives and Compliance with Patient Advance Directives: The Role External Factors Play on Physician Decision Making. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):31-.score: 249.0
    Background Following passage of the Patient Self Determination Act in 1990, health care institutions that receive Medicare and Medicaid funding are required to inform patients of their right to make their health care preferences known through execution of a living will and/or to appoint a surrogate-decision maker. We evaluated the impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physicians’ decisions to honor or forgo previously established advance directives (ADs). In addition, physician views regarding legal risk, patients’ ability to comprehend (...)
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  18. T. Z. Movsas, E. Wells, A. Mongoven & V. Grigorescu (2012). Does Medical Insurance Type (Private Vs Public) Influence the Physician's Decision to Perform Caesarean Delivery? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):470-473.score: 246.0
    Introduction US data reveal a Caesarean rate discrepancy between insured and uninsured patients, with the C-section rate highest among the privately insured. The data have prompted concern that financial incentives associated with insurance status might influence American physicians' decisions to perform Caesarean deliveries. Objective To determine whether differences in medical risk factors account for the apparent Caesarean rate discrepancy between Medicaid and privately insured patients in Michigan, USA. Method A retrospective review was performed of 617 269 live birth deliveries in (...)
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  19. A. M. Jafarey (2005). Informed Consent in the Pakistani Milieu: The Physician's Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):93-96.score: 246.0
    Informed consent enjoys an unassailable position in both clinical and research situations as a safeguard of patients’ rights. Keeping the patient involved in the decision making process is easier when there is direct communication with the individual. The Pakistani milieu offers challenges to this process because crucial decision making is often done by family members or is left entirely up to the attending physician. There seems to be a general acceptance of this shifting of focus from the individual to other (...)
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  20. Jerome P. Kassirer (2005). On the Take: How America's Complicity with Big Business Can Endanger Your Health. Oxford University Press.score: 228.0
    We all know that doctors accept gifts from drug companies, ranging from pens and coffee mugs to free vacations at luxurious resorts. But as the former Editor-in-Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine reveals in this shocking expose, these innocuous-seeming gifts are just the tip of an iceberg that is distorting the practice of medicine and jeopardizing the health of millions of Americans today. In On the Take, Dr. Jerome Kassirer offers an unsettling look at the pervasive payoffs that (...)
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  21. Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Katherine M. James & Jon C. Tilburt (2013). The Moral Psychology of Rationing Among Physicians: The Role of Harm and Fairness Intuitions in Physician Objections to Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Containment. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):13.score: 214.0
    Physicians vary in their moral judgments about health care costs. Social intuitionism posits that moral judgments arise from gut instincts, called “moral foundations.” The objective of this study was to determine if “harm” and “fairness” intuitions can explain physicians’ judgments about cost-containment in U.S. health care and using cost-effectiveness data in practice, as well as the relative importance of those intuitions compared to “purity”, “authority” and “ingroup” in cost-related judgments.
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  22. Martine C. de Vries, Mirjam Houtlosser, Jan M. Wit, Dirk P. Engberts, Dorine Bresters, Gertjan Jl Kaspers & Evert van Leeuwen (2011). Ethical Issues at the Interface of Clinical Care and Research Practice in Pediatric Oncology: A Narrative Review of Parents' and Physicians' Experiences. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):18.score: 195.0
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  23. J. Savulescu (1998). Two Worlds Apart: Religion and Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):382-384.score: 180.0
    In a recent article entitled, Requests "for inappropriate" treatment based on religious beliefs, Orr and Genesen claim that futile treatment should be provided to patients who request it if their request is based on a religious belief. I claim that this implies that we should also accede to requests for harmful or cost-ineffective treatments based on religious beliefs. This special treatment of religious requests is an example of special pleading on the part of theists and morally objectionable discrimination against atheists. (...)
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  24. A. J. Fenwick (1999). Best Interests in Persistent Vegetative State. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):59-60.score: 180.0
  25. Uta Bittner, Sebastian Armbrust & Franziska Krause (2013). „Doctor knows best“? – Eine Analyse der Arzt-Patient-Beziehung in der TV-KrankenhausserieDr. House. Ethik in der Medizin 25 (1):33-45.score: 180.0
    Vor dem Hintergrund, dass in den Medien und der Öffentlichkeit thematisierte und dargestellte Arztbilder stets auch auf die öffentliche Meinung und die Vorstellungen der Menschen von Ärzten wirken, spürt der Artikel der Frage nach, welches Arztbild die amerikanische TV-KrankenhausserieDr. House transportiert und welche Ausprägung das dargestellte Arzt-Patienten-Verhältnis einnimmt. Hierbei werden die medizinethischen Reflexionen durch eine detaillierte medienwissenschaftliche Genre-Einordnung und dramaturgische Analyse eingerahmt und unterstützt. Zudem werden als Analyseinstrumentarium die vier Modelle des Arzt-Patienten-Verhältnisses nach Emanuel/Emanuel herangezogen. Dieser interdisziplinäre Forschungsansatz zeigt, dass (...)
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  26. Richard E. Thompson (2007). So You're on the Ethics Committee? A Primer and Practical Guidebook: 21st Century Practical Ethics Applied to 21st Century Health Care. [REVIEW] American College of Physician Executives.score: 180.0
     
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  27. Steven C. Schachter (ed.) (2008). Managing Relationships with Industry: A Physician's Compliance Manual. Elsevier.score: 172.0
    Background -- Overview of legal sources -- Summary of recent prosecutions and investigations -- Applications of law and professional and trade association standards to physician relationships with industry -- Legal and ethical aspects of specific physician's industry financial relationships -- Approaching and adopting effective compliance plans.
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  28. Mark R. Wicclair (2008). Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with a Physician's Professional Obligations? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):171--185.score: 168.0
    In response to physicians who refuse to provide medical services that are contrary to their ethical and/or religious beliefs, it is sometimes asserted that anyone who is not willing to provide legally and professionally permitted medical services should choose another profession. This article critically examines the underlying assumption that conscientious objection is incompatible with a physician’s professional obligations (the “incompatibility thesis”). Several accounts of the professional obligations of physicians are explored: general ethical theories (consequentialism, contractarianism, and rights-based theories), internal morality (...)
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  29. Glenn G. Griener (1995). The Physician's Authority to Withhold Futile Treatment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (2):207-224.score: 168.0
    The debate over futility is driven, in part, by physicians' desire to recover some measure of decision-making authority from their patients. The standard approach begins by noting that certain interventions are futile for certain patients and then asserts that doctors have no obligation to provide futile treatment. The concept of futility is a complex one, and many commentators find it useful to distinguish ‘physiological futility’ from ‘qualitative futility’. The assertion that physicians can decide to withhold physiologically futile treatment generates little (...)
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  30. Thomas Tomlinson (1986). The Physician's Influence on Patients' Choices. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (2).score: 168.0
    Although the traditional physician ethic sees nothing objectionable about the doctor's influence over patients, superficial conceptions of the patient's right to self-determination imply that this influence may be manipulative. On the contrary, there are several different lines of argument which can reconcile self-determination with the physician's influence. Nevertheless, drawing the boundaries between legitimate methods of persuasion, and manipulation or coercion sometimes proves difficult.
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  31. Laurence B. McCullough (1998). A Transcultural, Preventive Ethics Approach to Critical-Care Medicine: Restoring the Critical Care Physician's Power and Authority. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (6):628 – 642.score: 168.0
    This article comments on the treatment of critical-care ethics in four preceding articles about critical-care medicine and its ethical challenges in mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, and the Philippines. These articles show how cultural values can be in both synchrony and conflict in generating these ethical challenges and in the constraints that they place on the response of critical-care ethics to them. To prevent ethical conflict in critical care the author proposes a two-step approach to the ethical jus tification of (...)
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  32. R. D. Orr (2012). The Physician's Right of Refusal: What Are the Limits? Christian Bioethics 18 (1):30-40.score: 168.0
    A physician’s long-established right to refuse to provide a requested service based on his or her moral beliefs is being challenged. Some authors suggest that physicians should not be licensed if they are unwilling to provide all legal services. Others would grant them the right to refuse, but require them to refer to a willing professional. What are the limits of a physician’s right to refuse? When such a right is claimed on moral grounds, what residual obligations does the physician (...)
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  33. C. K. Fang, P. Y. Li, M. L. Lai, M. H. Lin, D. T. Bridge & H. W. Chen (2011). Establishing a 'Physician's Spiritual Well-Being Scale' and Testing its Reliability and Validity. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):6-12.score: 168.0
    The purpose of this study was to develop a Physician's Spiritual Well-Being Scale (PSpWBS). The significance of a physician's spiritual well-being was explored through in-depth interviews with and qualitative data collection from focus groups. Based on the results of qualitative analysis and related literature, the PSpWBS consisting of 25 questions was established. Reliability and validity tests were performed on 177 subjects. Four domains of the PSpWBS were devised: physician's characteristics; medical practice challenges; response to changes; and overall (...)
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  34. Frank P. Lengers (1994). The Idea of the Absurd and the Moral Decision. Possibilities and Limits of a Physician's Actions in the View of the Absurd. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).score: 164.0
    In reference to two central concepts of Albert Camus' philosophy, that is, the absurd and the rebellion, this article examines to what extent hisThe Plague is of interest to medical ethics. The interpretation of this novel put forward in this article focuses on the main character of the novel, the physician Dr. Rieux. For Rieux, the plague epidemic, as it is described in the novel, implies an unquestioning commitment to his patients and fellow men. According to Camus this epidemic has (...)
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  35. Delon Human (2002). Conflicts of Interest in Science and Medicine: The Physician's Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):273-276.score: 164.0
    The various statements and declarations of the World Medical Association that address conflicts of interest on the part of physicians as (1) researchers, and (2) practitioners, are examined, with particular reference to the October 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki. Recent contributions to the literature, notably on conflicts of interest in medical research, are noted. Finally, key provisions of the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics (2000–2001 Edition) that address the various forms of conflict of interest that can (...)
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  36. Alan Schwartz (2008). Medical Decision Making: A Physician's Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 158.0
    Decision making is a key activity, perhaps the most important activity, in the practice of healthcare. Although physicians acquire a great deal of knowledge and specialised skills during their training and through their practice, it is in the exercise of clinical judgement and its application to individual patients that the outstanding physician is distinguished. This has become even more relevant as patients become increasingly welcomed as partners in a shared decision making process. This book translates the research and theory from (...)
     
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  37. William E. Stempsey (2010). The Role of Religion in the Debate About Physician-Assisted Dying. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):383-387.score: 156.0
    This paper explores the role of religious belief in public debate about physician-assisted dying and argues that the role is essential because any discussion about the way we die raises the deepest questions about the meaning of human life and death. For religious people, such questions are essentially religious ones, even when the religious elements are framed in secular political or philosophical language. The paper begins by reviewing some of the empirical data about religious belief and practice in (...)
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  38. Mary F. Engel (2005). Achieving “Narrative Flow”: Pre-Medical Education as an Essential Chapter of a Physician's Story. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 26 (1):39-51.score: 154.0
    This article explores the disconnection between what pre-professional students expect from college and what their undergraduate education might foster, between the focus on “getting into medical school” and the development of humanistic physicians. It reviews the longstanding challenge inherent in helping pre-meds acquire not only sufficient scientific background but also well-developed interpersonal skills to help them understand patients’ experience of illness and their own interactions with other members of the health care team. Clinical experiences from the NEH Institute are interpreted (...)
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  39. Lois Snyder & Paul S. Mueller (2008). Research in the Physician's Office:. Hastings Center Report 38 (2):23-25.score: 152.0
    : Dr. Smith is an internist in private practice who works at an inner city clinic affiliated with a university hospital. He is also a member of the university faculty. Many of Dr. Smith’s patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus and struggle with health care and other costs. Thinking about opportunities to better serve his patients and advance his career, Dr. Smith considers conducting clinical research in his office. ACME is a respected pharmaceutical company that for decades has engaged in (...)
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  40. Lonzozou Kpanake, Kolou S. Dassa, Paul Clay Sorum & Etienne Mullet (forthcoming). Togolese Lay People's and Health Professionals' Views About the Acceptability of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101424.score: 150.0
    AIM: To study the views on the acceptability of physician-assisted-suicide (PAS) of lay people and health professionals in an African country, Togo.\n\nMETHOD: In February-June 2012, 312 lay people and 198 health professionals (75 physicians, 60 nurses and 63 health counsellors) in Togo judged the acceptability of PAS in 36 concrete scenarios composed of all combinations of four factors: (a) the patient's age, (b) the level of incurability of the illness, (c) the type of suffering and (d) the patient's request for (...)
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  41. Thalia Arawi (2010). The Lebanese Physician: A Public's Viewpoint. Developing World Bioethics 10 (1):22-29.score: 148.0
    A physician's lack of humanity is a general complaint in public surveys. The physician-patient relationship is viewed by the public as being reduced to a business relationship where the patient feels that she is merely a 'client' and the physician a healthcare 'practitioner' instead of a 'care giver'. This public perception is not a phenomenon that is peculiar to Lebanon. Yet, the problem has been increasing over the years to the extent that patients feel that physicians are becoming inhumane (...)
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  42. R. Puustinen (2000). Voices to Be Heard—the Many Positions of a Physician in Anton Chekhov's Short Story, A Case History. Medical Humanities 26 (1):37-42.score: 148.0
    Next SectionAnton Chekhov (1860-1904) dealt in many of his short stories and plays with various phenomena as encountered in everyday medical practice in late 19th century Russia. In A Case History (1898) Chekhov illustrates the physician's many positions in relation to his patient. According to Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language, a speaker occupies a certain position from which he or she addresses the listener. A phenomenon may gain different meanings depending on the position from which it is addressed. In (...)
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  43. Perry A. Pugno (2004). One Physician's Perspective: Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (3):215-223.score: 146.0
    This paper looks at the ambiguities which PAS (physician assisted suicide) and voluntary active euthanasia (VAE ) present to the patient, his or her loved ones and the health-care team. The author pleads for a greater emphasis on humanizing the experience of the dying so that a team can meet their physical, emotional and spiritual needs.
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  44. Lawrence J. Schneiderman (2000). Alternative Medicine or Alternatives to Medicine? A Physician's Perspective. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (01):83-97.score: 146.0
    Regina R. is a 12-year-old girl with recently diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetes. Before discharging her from the hospital, her family physician and consulting diabetes specialist try to instruct the girl and her parents in the appropriate program of treatment, including diet, insulin, and regular self-monitoring. However, the parents become upset when they learn what is involved in insulin treatment and inform the family physician they plan to employ the services of an alternative healing clinic that promises to cure their daughter with (...)
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  45. Richard Moskowitz (2012). Forhomeopathy: A Practising Physician's Perspective. Bioethics 26 (9):499-500.score: 146.0
    This article is a rebuttal to Kevin Smith's ‘Against Homeopathy,’ which was posted on 14 February 2011.1 It contends that his argument rests entirely on the assumption that homeopathic remedies are nothing but placebos. His argumentation is good, but his assumption is false. Evidence is presented to show that the Law of Similars is plausible and that ultradilute remedies do indeed have biological activity.
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  46. S. Hans-Martin (2000). Advance Directives: Self-Determination, Physician's Responsibility, Value of Life. Analecta Husserliana 64:239-254.score: 146.0
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  47. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1988). For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 144.0
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life (...)
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  48. Michael Gill, A Moral Defense of Oregon's Physician-Assisted Suicide Law.score: 144.0
    Since 1998, physician-assisted suicide has been legal in the American state of Oregon. In this paper, I defend Oregon’s physician-assisted suicide (PAS) law against two of the most common objections raised against it. First, I try to show that it is not intrinsically wrong for someone with a terminal disease to kill herself. Second, I try to show that it is not intrinsically wrong for physicians to assist someone with a terminal disease who has reasonable grounds for wanting to kill (...)
     
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  49. Nico Peruzzi, Andrew Canapary & Bruce Bongar (1996). Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Role of Mental Health Professionals. Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):353 – 366.score: 144.0
    A review of the literature was conducted to better understand the (potential) role of mental health professionals in physician-assisted suicide. Numerous studies indicate that depression is one of the most commonly encountered psychiatric illnesses in primary care settings. Yet, depression consistently goes undetected and undiagnosed by nonpsychiatrically trained primary care physicians. Noting the well-studied link between depression and suicide, it is necessary to question giving sole responsibility of assisting patients in making end-of-life treatment decisions to these physicians. Unfortunately, the (...)
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  50. J. Strain James (1991). Chronic Illness and the Physician-Patient Relationship: A Response to the Hastings Center's "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness". Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2).score: 144.0
    The following article is a response to the position paper of the Hastings Center, "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness", a product of their three year project on Ethics and Chronic Care. The authors of this paper, three prominent bioethicists, Daniel Callahan, Arthur Caplan, and Bruce Jennings, argue that there should be a different ethic for acute and chronic care. In pressing this distinction they provide philosophical grounds for limiting medical care for the elderly and chronically ill. We give a critical (...)
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