Search results for 'Sustaining mechanisms' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Jussi Jylkkä (2009). Why Fodor's Theory of Concepts Fails. Minds and Machines 19 (1):25-46.score: 36.0
    Fodor’s theory of concepts holds that the psychological capacities, beliefs or intentions which determine how we use concepts do not determine reference. Instead, causal relations of a specific kind between properties and our dispositions to token a concept are claimed to do so. Fodor does admit that there needs to be some psychological mechanisms mediating the property–concept tokening relations, but argues that they are purely accidental for reference. In contrast, I argue that the actual mechanisms that sustain the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Cristina Gimenez & Vicenta Sierra (2013). Sustainable Supply Chains: Governance Mechanisms to Greening Suppliers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):189-203.score: 36.0
    One of the key challenges for firms is to manage sustainability along the supply chain. To extend sustainability to suppliers, organizations have developed different governance mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effectiveness of two different mechanisms (i.e., supplier assessment and collaboration with suppliers) to improve one dimension of sustainability: environmental performance. Structural Equation Modeling and cluster analysis were used to analyze the relationships between supplier assessment, collaboration with suppliers, and environmental performance. The results suggest (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Deborah E. de Lange (2013). How Do Universities Make Progress? Stakeholder-Related Mechanisms Affecting Adoption of Sustainability in University Curricula. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):103-116.score: 26.0
    This paper develops a theoretical model to explicate stakeholder-related mechanisms that affect university adoption of sustainability in curricula. This work combines stakeholder and institutional theories so as to extend both. By examining change in the university context wherein there is confusion about sustainability adoption, this research adds to previous institutional theory focusing on strongly contested practices, primarily in the for-profit firm setting. Sustainability is a transformational challenge and may be adopted reactively or proactively. Also, stakeholder theory is extended in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Katja Saupe, Erich Schröger, Søen K. Andersen & Matthias M. Müller (2009). Neural Mechanisms of Intermodal Sustained Selective Attention with Concurrently Presented Auditory and Visual Stimuli. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:58.score: 26.0
    We investigated intermodal attention effects on the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) and the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP). For this purpose, 40 Hz amplitude modulated tones and a stream of flickering (7.5 Hz) random letters were presented concurrently. By means of an auditory or visual target detection task, participants’ attention was directed to the respective modality for several seconds. Attention to the auditory stream led to a significant enhancement of the ASSR compared to when the visual stream was attended. This (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William Bechtel & Adele A. Abrahamsen (2013). Thinking Dynamically About Biological Mechanisms: Networks of Coupled Oscillators. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (4):707-723.score: 21.0
    Explaining the complex dynamics exhibited in many biological mechanisms requires extending the recent philosophical treatment of mechanisms that emphasizes sequences of operations. To understand how nonsequentially organized mechanisms will behave, scientists often advance what we call dynamic mechanistic explanations. These begin with a decomposition of the mechanism into component parts and operations, using a variety of laboratory-based strategies. Crucially, the mechanism is then recomposed by means of computational models in which variables or terms in differential equations correspond (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Sabine Beck, Andreas van de Loo & Stella Reiter-Theil (2008). A “Little Bit Illegal”? Withholding and Withdrawing of Mechanical Ventilation in the Eyes of German Intensive Care Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):7-16.score: 21.0
    Research questions and backgroundThis study explores a highly controversial issue of medical care in Germany: the decision to withhold or withdraw mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients. It analyzes difficulties in making these decisions and the physicians’ uncertainty in understanding the German terminology of Sterbehilfe, which is used in the context of treatment limitation. Used in everyday language, the word Sterbehilfe carries connotations such as helping the patient in the dying process or helping the patient to enter the dying process. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Mark B. Couch (2011). Mechanisms and Constitutive Relevance. Synthese 183 (3):375-388.score: 18.0
    This paper will examine the nature of mechanisms and the distinction between the relevant and irrelevant parts involved in a mechanism’s operation. I first consider Craver’s account of this distinction in his book on the nature of mechanisms, and explain some problems. I then offer a novel account of the distinction that appeals to some resources from Mackie’s theory of causation. I end by explaining how this account enables us to better understand what mechanisms are and their (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Zenonas Norkus (2007). Troubles with Mechanisms: Problems of the 'Mechanistic Turn' in Historical Sociology and Social History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2):160-200.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the prospect of the "new social history" guided by the recent work of Charles Tilly on the methodology of social and historical explanation. Tilly advocates explanation by mechanisms as the alternative to the covering law explanation. Tilly's proposals are considered to be the attempt to reshape the practices of social and historical explanation following the example set by the explanatory practices of molecular biology, neurobiology, and other recent "success stories" in the life sciences. Recent work in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Wayne Wu & Raymond Cho (2013). Mechanisms of Auditory Verbal Hallucination in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Schizophrenia 4.score: 18.0
    Recent work on the mechanisms underlying auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) has been heavily informed by self-monitoring accounts that postulate defects in an internal monitoring mechanism as the basis of AVH. A more neglected alternative is an account focusing on defects in auditory processing, namely a spontaneous activation account of auditory activity underlying AVH. Science is often aided by putting theories in competition. Accordingly, a discussion that systematically contrasts the two models of AVH can generate sharper questions that will lead (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Holly Andersen (2014). A Field Guide to Mechanisms: Part I. Philosophy Compass 9 (4):274-283.score: 18.0
    In this field guide, I distinguish five separate senses with which the term ‘mechanism’ is used in contemporary philosophy of science. Many of these senses have overlapping areas of application but involve distinct philosophical claims and characterize the target mechanisms in relevantly different ways. This field guide will clarify the key features of each sense and introduce some main debates, distinguishing those that transpire within a given sense from those that are best understood as concerning distinct senses. The ‘new (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Maarten Boudry & Johan Braeckman (2011). Immunizing Strategies and Epistemic Defense Mechanisms. Philosophia 39 (1):145-161.score: 18.0
    An immunizing strategy is an argument brought forward in support of a belief system, though independent from that belief system, which makes it more or less invulnerable to rational argumentation and/or empirical evidence. By contrast, an epistemic defense mechanism is defined as a structural feature of a belief system which has the same effect of deflecting arguments and evidence. We discuss the remarkable recurrence of certain patterns of immunizing strategies and defense mechanisms in pseudoscience and other belief systems. Five (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Arthur R. Derse (1999). Making Decisions About Life-Sustaining Medical Treatment in Patients with Dementia. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (1):55-67.score: 18.0
    The problem of decision-making capacity in patients with dementia, such as those with early stage Alzheimer's, can be vexing, especially when these patients refuse life-sustaining medical treatments. However, these patients should not be presumed to lack decision-making capacity. Instead, an analysis of the patient's decision-making capacity should be made. Patients who have some degree of decision-making capacity may be able to make a choice about life-sustaining medical treatment and may, in many cases, choose to forgo treatment.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Holly Andersen (2014). A Field Guide to Mechanisms: Part II. Philosophy Compass 9 (4):284-293.score: 18.0
    In this field guide, I distinguish five separate senses with which the term ‘mechanism’ is used in contemporary philosophy of science. Many of these senses have overlapping areas of application but involve distinct philosophical claims and characterize the target mechanisms in relevantly different ways. This field guide will clarify the key features of each sense and introduce some main debates, distinguishing those that transpire within a given sense from those that are best understood as concerning two distinct senses. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Holly Andersen (2012). Mechanisms: What Are They Evidence for in Evidence-Based Medicine. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):992-999.score: 18.0
    Even though the evidence‐based medicine movement (EBM) labels mechanisms a low quality form of evidence, consideration of the mechanisms on which medicine relies, and the distinct roles that mechanisms might play in clinical practice, offers a number of insights into EBM itself. In this paper, I examine the connections between EBM and mechanisms from several angles. I diagnose what went wrong in two examples where mechanistic reasoning failed to generate accurate predictions for how a dysfunctional mechanism (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jukka Varelius (2013). Pascal's Wager and Deciding About the Life-Sustaining Treatment of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State. Neuroethics 6 (2):277-285.score: 18.0
    An adaptation of Pascal’s Wager argument has been considered useful in deciding about the provision of life-sustaining treatment for patients in persistent vegetative state. In this article, I assess whether people making such decisions should resort to the application of Pascal’s idea. I argue that there is no sufficient reason to give it an important role in making the decisions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Johannes Persson (2005). Tropes as Mechanisms. Foundations of Science 10 (4):371-393.score: 18.0
    This paper is an attempt to further our understanding of mechanisms conceived of as ontologically separable from laws. What opportunities are there for a mechanistic perspective to be independent of, or even more fundamental than, a law perspective? Advocates of the mechanistic view often play with the possibility of internal and external reliability, or with the paralleling possibilities of enforcing, counteracting, redirecting, etc., the mechanisms’ power to produce To further this discussion I adopt a trope ontology. It is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ward B. Watt (2013). Causal Mechanisms of Evolution and the Capacity for Niche Construction. Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):757-766.score: 18.0
    Ernst Mayr proposed a distinction between “proximate”, mechanistic, and “ultimate”, evolutionary, causes of biological phenomena. This dichotomy has influenced the thinking of many biologists, but it is increasingly perceived as impeding modern studies of evolutionary processes, including study of “niche construction” in which organisms alter their environments in ways supportive of their evolutionary success. Some still find value for this dichotomy in its separation of answers to “how?” versus “why?”questions about evolution. But “why is A?” questions about evolution necessarily take (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Joachim Keppler (2013). A New Perspective on the Functioning of the Brain and the Mechanisms Behind Conscious Processes. Frontiers in Psychology, Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 4 (Article 242):1-6.score: 18.0
    An essential prerequisite for the development of a theory of consciousness is the clarification of the fundamental mechanisms underlying conscious processes. In this article I present an approach that sheds new light on these mechanisms. This approach builds on stochastic electrodynamics (SED), a promising theoretical framework that provides a deeper understanding of quantum systems and reveals the origin of quantum phenomena. I outline the most important concepts and findings of SED and interpret the neurophysiological body of evidence in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Michael Domjan, Brian Cusato & Ronald Villarreal (2000). Pavlovian Feed-Forward Mechanisms in the Control of Social Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):235-249.score: 18.0
    The conceptual and investigative tools for the analysis of social behavior can be expanded by integrating biological theory, control systems theory, and Pavlovian conditioning. Biological theory has focused on the costs and benefits of social behavior from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. In contrast, control systems theory is concerned with how machines achieve a particular goal or purpose. The accurate operation of a system often requires feed-forward mechanisms that adjust system performance in anticipation of future inputs. Pavlovian conditioning is ideally (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alexander Gebharter (2014). A Formal Framework for Representing Mechanisms? Philosophy of Science 81 (1):138-153.score: 18.0
    In this article I tackle the question of how the hierarchical order of mechanisms can be represented within a causal graph framework. I illustrate an answer to this question proposed by Casini, Illari, Russo, and Williamson and provide an example that their formalism does not support two important features of nested mechanisms: (i) a mechanism’s submechanisms are typically causally interacting with other parts of said mechanism, and (ii) intervening in some of a mechanism’s parts should have some influence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Brendan Clarke, Bert Leuridan & Jon Williamson (2013). Modelling Mechanisms with Causal Cycles. Synthese:1-31.score: 18.0
    Mechanistic philosophy of science views a large part of scientific activity as engaged in modelling mechanisms. While science textbooks tend to offer qualitative models of mechanisms, there is increasing demand for models from which one can draw quantitative predictions and explanations. Casini et al. (Theoria 26(1):5–33, 2011) put forward the Recursive Bayesian Networks (RBN) formalism as well suited to this end. The RBN formalism is an extension of the standard Bayesian net formalism, an extension that allows for modelling (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Theodore T. Y. Chen (2001). Ethics Control Mechanisms: A Comparative Observation of Hong Kong Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (4):391 - 400.score: 18.0
    Managers with different cultural backgrounds and under different circumstances have different views on what is acceptable ethical behaviour. This study attempts to determine whether major companies in Hong Kong share the same views as North American academics on what management ethical standards ought to be, and if so, whether any control mechanisms have been established to instill ethical behaviour within their organizations. Notable differences between the practice in these companies and those from a similar survey conducted in North America (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (2012). EnviroGenomarkers: The Interplay Between Mechanisms and Difference Making in Establishing Causal Claims. Medicine Studies 3 (4):249-262.score: 18.0
    According to Russo and Williamson (Int Stud Philos Sci 21(2):157–170, 2007, Hist Philos Life Sci 33:389–396, 2011a, Philos Sci 1(1):47–69, 2011b), in order to establish a causal claim of the form, ‘C is a cause of E’, one typically needs evidence that there is an underlying mechanism between C and E as well as evidence that C makes a difference to E. This thesis has been used to argue that hierarchies of evidence, as championed by evidence-based movements, tend to give (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Raffaella Campaner (2011). Understanding Mechanisms in the Health Sciences. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):5-17.score: 18.0
    This article focuses on the assessment of mechanistic relations with specific attention to medicine, where mechanistic models are widely employed. I first survey recent contributions in the philosophical literature on mechanistic causation, and then take issue with Federica Russo and Jon Williamson’s thesis that two types of evidence, probabilistic and mechanistic, are at stake in the health sciences. I argue instead that a distinction should be drawn between previously acquired knowledge of mechanisms and yet-to-be-discovered knowledge of mechanisms and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Adam Feltz & Stephanie Samayoa (2012). Heuristics and Life-Sustaining Treatments. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):443-455.score: 18.0
    Surrogates’ decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatments (LSTs) are pervasive. However, the factors influencing surrogates’ decisions to initiate LSTs are relatively unknown. We present evidence from two experiments indicating that some surrogates’ decisions about when to initiate LSTs can be predictably manipulated. Factors that influence surrogate decisions about LSTs include the patient’s cognitive state, the patient’s age, the percentage of doctors not recommending the initiation of LSTs, the percentage of patients in similar situations not wanting LSTs, and default (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Amit Saini & Mike Krush (2008). Anomie and the Marketing Function: The Role of Control Mechanisms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):845 - 863.score: 18.0
    The authors use the theoretical notion of anomie to examine the impact of top management’s control mechanisms on the environment of the marketing function. Based on a literature review and in-depth field interviews with marketing managers in diverse industries, a conceptual model is proposed that incorporates the two managerial control mechanisms, viz. output and process control, and relates their distinctive influence to anomie in the marketing function. Three contingency variables, i.e., resource scarcity, power, and ethics codification, are proposed (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Matthew W. Crocker Afra Alishahi, Afsaneh Fazly, Judith Koehne (2012). Sentence-Based Attentional Mechanisms in Word Learning: Evidence From a Computational Model. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    When looking for the referents of nouns, adults and young children are sensitive to cross- situational statistics (Yu & Smith, 2007; Smith & Yu, 2008). In addition, the linguistic context that a word appears in has been shown to act as a powerful attention mechanism for guiding sentence processing and word learning (Landau & Gleitman, 1985; Altmann & Kamide, 1999; Kako & Trueswell, 2000). Koehne & Crocker (2010, 2011) investigate the interaction between cross-situational evidence and guidance from the sentential context (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Afra Alishahi, Afsaneh Fazly, Judith Koehne & Matthew W. Crocker (2012). Sentence-Based Attentional Mechanisms in Word Learning: Evidence From a Computational Model. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    When looking for the referents of nouns, adults and young children are sensitive to cross- situational statistics (Yu & Smith, 2007; Smith & Yu, 2008). In addition, the linguistic context that a word appears in has been shown to act as a powerful attention mechanism for guiding sentence processing and word learning (Landau & Gleitman, 1985; Altmann & Kamide, 1999; Kako & Trueswell, 2000). Koehne & Crocker (2010, 2011) investigate the interaction between cross-situational evidence and guidance from the sentential context (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Luigi Cattaneo Arthur M. Glenberg, Gabriel Lopez-Mobilia, Michael McBeath, Michael Toma, Marc Sato (2010). Knowing Beans: Human Mirror Mechanisms Revealed Through Motor Adaptation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 18.0
    Human mirror mechanisms (MMs) respond during both performed and observed action and appear to underlie action goal recognition. We introduce a behavioral procedure for discovering and clarifying functional MM properties: Blindfolded participants repeatedly move beans either toward or away from themselves to induce motor adaptation. Then, the bias for perceiving direction of ambiguous visual movement in depth is measured. Bias is affected by a) number of beans moved, b) movement direction, and c) similarity of the visual stimulus to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Giovanni Boniolo (2013). On Molecular Mechanisms and Contexts of Physical Explanation. Biological Theory 7 (3):256-265.score: 18.0
    In this article, two issues regarding mechanisms are discussed. The first concerns the relationships between “mechanism description” and “mechanism explanation.” It is proposed that it is rather plausible to think of them as two distinct epistemic acts. The second deals with the different molecular biology explanatory contexts, and it is shown that some of them require physics and its laws.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Yen-Yuan Chen, Likwang Chen, Tien-Shang Huang, Wen-Je Ko, Tzong-Shinn Chu, Yen-Hsuan Ni & Shan-Chwen Chang (2014). Significant Social Events and Increasing Use of Life-Sustaining Treatment: Trend Analysis Using Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as an Example. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):21.score: 18.0
    Most studies have examined the outcomes of patients supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a life-sustaining treatment. It is unclear whether significant social events are associated with the use of life-sustaining treatment. This study aimed to compare the trend of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in Taiwan with that in the world, and to examine the influence of significant social events on the trend of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in Taiwan.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ricardo A. Cruciani Helena Knotkova, Michael A. Nitsche (2013). Putative Physiological Mechanisms Underlying tDCS Analgesic Effects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique that induces changes in excitability, and activation of brain neurons and neuronal circuits. It has been observed that beyond regional effects under the electrodes, tDCS also alters activity of remote interconnected cortical and subcortical areas. This makes the tDCS stimulation technique potentially promising for modulation of pain syndromes. Indeed, utilizing specific montages, tDCS resulted in analgesic effects in experimental settings, as well as in post-operative acute pain and chronic pain syndromes. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Philipp Schmidinger (2010). Visiting Mechanisms to Eradicate Torture: A Foucaultian Analysis. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (3):317-355.score: 18.0
    In this Article, I examine the Visiting Mechanisms under the Convention against Torture (CAT) and the Optional Protocol thereto (OPCAT), applying an analytic approach resting on Foucault’s Discipline and Punish. I argue that international Visiting Mechanisms essentially constitute disciplinary apparatuses as depicted by Foucault. However, because they fail to recognise this functional similarity, they do not effectively apply the methods of inducing panoptic power. Most notably the concept of ‘hierarchical observation’ is hardly utilised at all. The two introduced (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Gary F. Peters & Andrea M. Romi (2013). Does the Voluntary Adoption of Corporate Governance Mechanisms Improve Environmental Risk Disclosures? Evidence From Greenhouse Gas Emission Accounting. Journal of Business Ethics:1-30.score: 17.0
    Prior research suggests that voluntary environmental governance mechanisms operate to enhance a firm’s environmental legitimacy as opposed to being a driver of proactive environmental performance activities. To understand how these mechanisms contribute to the firm’s environmental legitimacy, we investigate whether environmental corporate governance characteristics are associated with voluntary environmental disclosure. We examine an increasingly important attribute of a firm’s disclosure setting, namely the disclosure of greenhouse gas (GHG) information. GHG information represents proprietary non-financial information about the firm’s exposure (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John Matthewson & Brett Calcott, Mechanistic Explanation Without Mechanisms.score: 16.0
    We provide an account of mechanistic representation and explanation that has several advantages over previous proposals. In our view, explaining mechanistically is not simply giving an explanation of a mechanism. Rather, an explanation is mechanistic because of particular relations that hold between a mechanical representation, or model, and the target of explanation. Under this interpretation, mechanistic explanation is possible even when the explanatory target is not a mechanism. We argue that taking this view is not only coherent and plausible, it (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Daniel A. Weiskopf (2011). Models and Mechanisms in Psychological Explanation. Synthese 183 (3):313-338.score: 15.0
    Mechanistic explanation has an impressive track record of advancing our understanding of complex, hierarchically organized physical systems, particularly biological and neural systems. But not every complex system can be understood mechanistically. Psychological capacities are often understood by providing cognitive models of the systems that underlie them. I argue that these models, while superficially similar to mechanistic models, in fact have a substantially more complex relation to the real underlying system. They are typically constructed using a range of techniques for abstracting (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. L. R. Franklin-Hall, The Emperor's New Mechanisms.score: 15.0
    This paper argues that the increasingly dominant new mechanistic approach to scientific explanation, as developed to date, does not shed new light on explanatory practice. First, I systematize the explanatory account, one according to which explanations are mechanistic models that satisfy three desiderata: 1) they must represent causal relations, 2) describe the proper parts, and 3) depict the system at the right ‘level.’ Then I argue that even the most promising attempts to flesh out these constraints have fallen far short. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Carl F. Craver (2009). Mechanisms and Natural Kinds. Philosophical Psychology 22 (5):575-594.score: 15.0
    It is common to defend the Homeostatic Property Cluster ( HPC ) view as a third way between conventionalism and essentialism about natural kinds ( Boyd , 1989, 1991, 1997, 1999; Griffiths , 1997, 1999; Keil , 2003; Kornblith , 1993; Wilson , 1999, 2005; Wilson , Barker , & Brigandt , forthcoming ). According to the HPC view, property clusters are not merely conventionally clustered together; the co-occurrence of properties in the cluster is sustained by a similarity generating ( (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Sasan Haghighi, In Search of Mechanisms in Neuroscience.score: 15.0
  40. Julian Reiss, Miriam Solomon & David Teira (2011). Mechanisms, Continental Approaches, Trials, and Evolutionary Medicine: New Work in the Philosophy of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):1-4.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David A. Silbersweig David R. Vago (2012). Self-Awareness, Self-Regulation, and Self-Transcendence (S-ART): A Framework for Understanding the Neurobiological Mechanisms of Mindfulness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 15.0
    Mindfulness - as a state, trait, process, type of meditation, and intervention has proven to be beneficial across a diverse group of psychological disorders as well as for general stress reduction. Yet, there remains a lack of clarity in the operationalization of this construct, and underlying mechanisms. Here, we provide an integrative theoretical framework and systems-based neurobiological model that explains the mechanisms by which mindfulness reduces biases related to self-processing and creates a sustainable healthy mind. Mindfulness is described (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Robyn Bluhm (2013). Physiological Mechanisms and Epidemiological Research. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):422 - 426.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jelle L. Epker, Yorick J. De Groot & Erwin J. O. Kompanje (2013). Obtaining Consent for Organ Donation From a Competent ICU Patient Who Does Not Want to Live Anymore and Who is Dependent on Life-Sustaining Treatment; Ethically Feasible? Clinical Ethics 8 (1):29-33.score: 15.0
    We anticipate a further decline of patients who eventually will become brain dead. The intensive care unit (ICU) is considered a last resort for patients with severe and multiple organ dysfunction. Patients with primary central nervous system failure constitute the largest group of patients in which life-sustaining treatment is withdrawn. Almost all these patients are unconscious at the moment physicians decide to withhold and withdraw life-sustaining measures. Sometimes, however competent ICU patients state that they do not want to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jörg-Peter Ewert (1987). Neuroethology of Releasing Mechanisms: Prey-Catching in Toads. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):337.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Giorgio Ganis Haline E. Schendan (2012). Electrophysiological Potentials Reveal Cortical Mechanisms for Mental Imagery, Mental Simulation, and Grounded (Embodied) Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 15.0
    Grounded cognition theory proposes that cognition, including meaning, is grounded in sensorimotor processing. The mechanism for grounding cognition is mental simulation, which is a type of mental imagery that re-enacts modal processing. To reveal top-down, cortical mechanisms for mental simulation of shape, event-related potentials were recorded to face and object pictures preceded by mental imagery of a picture. Mental imagery of the identical face or object (congruous condition) facilitated not only categorical perception (VPP/N170) but also later visual knowledge (N3[00] (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. N. Jack Kanak & M. Faith Dean (1969). Transfer Mechanisms in Verbal Discrimination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (2p1):300.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. N. Jack Kanak & John M. Knight (1974). The Re-Pairing Decrement in Verbal Discrimination Transfer: Further Evidence Favoring Associative Mechanisms. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):304.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. W. N. Kellogg (1941). Experimental Data on Different Neural Mechanisms for Learned and Unlearned Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (4):334.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. K. U. Smith & M. Bridgman (1943). The Neural Mechanisms of Movement Vision and Optic Nystagmus. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (3):165.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Frédérique Théry (2011). Characterizing Animal Development with Genetic Regulatory Mechanisms. Biological Theory 6 (1):16-24.score: 15.0
1 — 50 / 1000