Results for 'Animal rights activists'

998 found
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  1.  17
    In Favor of Tipping the Balance: Animal Rights Activists in Defense of Residential Picketing.Clinton R. Sanders & Justin R. Goodman - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (2):137-155.
    This discussion focuses on the rationales employed by animal rights activists to explain their involvement in, and support of, protest tactics that are controversial both inside and outside the animal rights movement. The paper centers on the use of residential picketing in a campaign against a private, multinational animal testing firm. Using ethnographic data and semistructured interviews with activists, the discussion demonstrates that these activists are aware of the marginality of their tactics. (...)
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  2. Rights of Animals, Perceptions of Science, and Political Activism: Profile of American Animal Rights Activists.William M. Lunch & Wesley V. Jamison - 1992 - Science, Technology and Human Values 17 (4):438-458.
    This article reports original research examining characteristics of the active followers of the American animal rights movement. Typical respondents were Caucasian, highly educated urban professional women approximately thirty years old with a median income of $33,000. Most activists think of themselves as Democrats or as Independents, and have moderate to liberal political views. They were often suspicious of science and made no distinctions between basic and applied science, or public versus private animal-based research. The research suggests (...)
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  3.  37
    Framing Animal Rights in the “Go Veg” Campaigns of U.S. Animal Rights Organizations.Carrie Packwood Freeman - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (2):163-182.
    How much do animal rights activists talk about animal rights when they attempt to persuade America’s meat-lovers to stop eating nonhuman animals? This study serves as the basis for a unique evaluation and categorization of problems and solutions as framed by five major U.S. animal rights organizations in their vegan/food campaigns. The findings reveal that the organizations framed the problems as: cruelty and suffering; commodification; harm to humans and the environment; and needless killing. (...)
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  4.  66
    Ethical Ideology, Animal Rights Activism, and Attitudes Toward the Treatment of Animals.Shelley L. Galvin & Harold A. Herzog Jr - 1992 - Ethics and Behavior 2 (3):141-149.
    In two studies, we used the Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ) to investigate the relationship between individual differences in moral philosophy, involvement in the animal rights movement, and attitudes toward the treatment of animals. In the first, 600 animal rights activists attending a national demonstration and 266 nonactivist college students were given the EPQ. Analysis of the returns from 157 activists and 198 students indicated that the activists were more likely than the students to (...)
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  5.  41
    Origin of Adult Animal Rights Lifestyle in Childhood Responsiveness to Animal Suffering.Nicole Pallotta - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (2):149-170.
    This qualitative study examines the childhood experiences of adult animal rights activists regarding their feelings about, and interactions with, nonhuman animals. Central to children's experiences with animals is the act of eating them, a ritual both normalized and encouraged by the dominant culture and agents of socialization. Yet, despite the massive power of socialization, sometimes children resist the dominant norms of consumption regarding animals. In addition to engaging in acts of resistance, some children, as suggested in the (...)
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  6.  50
    Constitutional Inclusion of Animal Rights in Germany and Switzerland: How Did Animal Protection Become an Issue of National Importance?Erin Evans - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (3):231-250.
    Provisions for animal rights have been included in the national constitutions of Switzerland and Germany . Protective constitutional inclusion is a major social movement success, and in view of the other movements also seeking increased political visibility and responsiveness, it is worth asking how and why nonhuman animals were allowed into this realm of political importance. This research seeks to explain how animal activists achieved this significant goal in two industrialized democracies. Using an approach drawn from (...)
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  7.  49
    Fast Food and Animal Rights: An Examination and Assessment of the Industry's Response to Social Pressure.Ronald J. Adams - 2008 - Business and Society Review 113 (3):301-328.
    ABSTRACTFast food chains such as McDonald's, KFC, and Burger King are major players in the production, marketing, and consumption of animal‐derived food throughout the world. Animal rights activists are quick to point out the link between the highly efficient factory farms that supply these chains and extreme animal cruelty and environmental degradation. Strategically, fast food is well positioned to leverage change in the methods by which animals are raised and processed for human consumption. Although progress (...)
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  8.  19
    Risk & Reward: The Impact of Animal Rights Activism on Women.Emily Gaarder - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (1):1-22.
    This qualitative study of 27 women animal activists examines the risks and rewards that accompany a commitment to animal rights activism. One of the common beliefs about animal rights activists is that their political choices are fanatic and unyielding, resulting in rigid self-denial. Contrary to this notion, the women in this study experienced both the pain and the joy of their transformation toward animal activism. Activism took an enormous toll on their personal (...)
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  9. Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion.Caspar Wenk, James Parker & Wesley Jamison - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (3):305-330.
    This article reports original research conducted among animal rights activists and elites in Switzerland and the United States, and the finding that activism functioned in activists' and elites' lives like religious belief. The study used reference sampling to select Swiss and American informants. Various articles and activists have identified both latent and manifest quasi-religious components in the contemporary movement. Hence, the research followed upon these data and anecdotes and tested the role of activism in adherents' (...)
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  10.  19
    The Caring Sleuth: Portrait of an Animal Rights Activist.Kenneth Shapiro - 1994 - Society and Animals 2 (2):145-165.
    The present study of the psychology of animal rights activists utilizes a qualitative analytic method based on two forms of data: a set of questionnaire protocols completed by grassroots activists and of autobiographical accounts by movement leaders. The resultant account keys on the following descriptives: an attitude of caring, suffering as an habitual object of perception, and the aggressive and skillful uncovering and investigation of instances of suffering. In a final section, the investigator discusses tensions and (...)
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  11.  34
    "I'm Not an Activist!": Animal Rights Vs. Animal Welfare in the Purebred Dog Rescue Movement.Jessica Greenebaum - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (4):289-304.
    Purebred dog rescuers are doing their part to reduce the problems of homeless pets and pet overpopulation. The volunteers studied are doing the daily and invisible work of saving dogs. Because of their perception of the animal rights movement, however, they do not consider themselves part of the animal welfare or animal rights movement, nor do they care to be. Dog rescue organizations agree with academics and activist organizations on the cause of the problem of (...)
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  12. Animal Rights: History and Scope of a Radical Social Movement.Harold D. Guither - 1998 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    In the past decade, philosopher Bernard Rollin points out, we have "witnessed a major revolution in social concern with animal welfare and the moral status of animals." Adopting the stance of a moderate, Harold Guither attempts to provide an unbiased examination of the paths and goals of the members of the animal rights movement and of its detractors. Given the level of confusion, suspicion, misunderstanding, and mistrust between the two sides, Guither admits the difficulty in locating, much (...)
     
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  13.  8
    Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion.James V. Parker, Wesley V. Jamison & Caspar Wenk - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (1):305-330.
    This article reports original research conducted among animal rights activists and elites in Switzerland and the United States, and the finding that activism functioned in activists' and elites' lives like religious belief. The study used reference sampling to select Swiss and American informants.Various articles and activists have identified both latent and manifest quasi-religious components in the contemporary movement Hence, the research followed upon these data and anecdotes and tested the role of activism in adherents' lives. (...)
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  14.  61
    Attitudes and Dispositional Optimism of Animal Rights Demonstrators.Harold A. Herzog & Shelley L. Galvin - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (1):1-11.
    Mail-in surveys were distributed to animal activists attending the 1996 March for the Animals. Age and genderdemographic characteristics of the 209 activists who participated in the study were similar to those of the 1990 March for the Animals demonstrators. Most goals of the animal rights movement were judged to be moderately to critically important, although beliefs about their chances of being realized varied considerably. Movement tactics judged to be least effective included the liberation of laboratory (...)
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  15. People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words.John M. Kistler - 2002 - Greenwood Press.
    Explores the many issues surrounding the animal rights and animal welfare movements through personal interview responses from rights activists.
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  16.  28
    Unlikely Allies Against Factory Farms: Animal Rights Advocates and Environmentalists. [REVIEW]David M. Holt - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):169-171.
    I examine the risks and opportunities associated with social movement coalition building in attempts to block or curtail the rise of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) in the United States. As producers have scaled up animal production facilities, environmentalists and animal rights activists, along with numerous other social actors, have begun anti-CAFO campaigns. I argue that while the CAFO has mobilized a diverse group of social actors, these individuals and organizations do not all have the (...)
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  17. The Peta Practical Guide to Animal Rights: Simple Acts of Kindness to Help Animals in Trouble.Ingrid Newkirk - 2009 - St. Martin's Griffin.
    With more than two million members and supporters, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is the world’s largest animal-rights organization, and its founder and president, Ingrid Newkirk, is one of the most well-known and most effective activists in America. She has spearheaded worldwide efforts to improve the treatment of animals in manufacturing, entertainment, and elsewhere. Every day, in laboratories, food factories, and other industries, animals by the millions are subjected to inhumane cruelty. In this accessible (...)
     
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  18. Gender, Class, and Social Movement Outcomes: Identity and Effectiveness in Two Animal Rights Campaigns.Rachel L. Einwohner - 1999 - Gender and Society 13 (1):56-76.
    Animal rights organizations in the United States are predominantly female and middle class. What are the implications of the composition of these groups for animal rights activists' abilities to achieve their goals? In this article, the author examines the role of class and gender in the outcomes of an anti-hunting campaign and an anti-circus campaign waged by one animal rights organization in the Seattle area. The article shows that hunters make classed and gendered (...)
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  19.  17
    Rawls and the Distribution of Human Resources By Those in the Animal Rights Community.Alan C. Clune - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):251-266.
    Until now, arguments for the distribution of resources by those who care about the plight of human-used animals have been either utilitarian or libertarian in nature. The utilitarian case has been made in writing by both activists and philosophers. The libertarian case is more a position that I have found comes naturally to many in the animal movement. In this article I make use of elements of Rawls’ A Theory of Justice to make a case for two principles (...)
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  20.  6
    On Some Difficulties of Putting in Dialogue Animal Rights with Anthropological Debates: A Historical View in Three Episodes.Alessandro Mancuso - 2018 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 31 (3):677-705.
    In this paper, I try to identify the reasons why the dialogue between sociocultural anthropology and animal rights theories and movements continues to be difficult and scarce. At first sight this weakness of communication is surprising, if one looks at the amount of anthropological studies on human/animal relationships, in most cases pointing to how animals are considered in many cultures as non-human subjects or persons. For understanding the roots of this state of affairs, I compare the ways (...)
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  21.  36
    The Animal Is Present: The Ethics of Animal Use in Contemporary Art.Anthony Cross - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):519-528.
    In recent years, an increasing number of contemporary artists have incorporated live animals into their work. Although this development has attracted a great deal of attention in the artworld and among animal rights activists, it has not been much discussed in the philosophy of art—which is quite remarkable, given the serious ethical and artistic questions that these artworks prompt. I focus on answering two such questions. First, is the use of animals in these artworks ethically objectionable? Or (...)
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  22.  63
    Animal Experimentation and the Argument From Limited Resources.Charles K. Fink - 1991 - Between the Species 7 (2):90-95.
    Animal rights activists are often accused of caring more about animals than about human beings. How, it is asked, can activists condemn the use of animals in biomedical research—research that improves human health and saves human lives? In this article, I argue that even if animal experimentation might eventually provide cures for many serious diseases, given the present state of the world, we are not justified supporting this research; rather, we ought to devote our limited (...)
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  23.  41
    Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy.Kathy Rudy - 2011 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Machine generated contents note: ContentsIntroduction: A Change of Heart1. What's behind Animal Advocacy? -- 2. The Love of a Dog: Of Pets and Puppy Mills, Mixed-Breeds and Shelters -- 3. The Animal on Your Plate: Farmers, Vegans, and Locavores -- 4. Where the Wild Things Ought to Be: Sanctuaries, Zoos, and Exotic Pets -- 5. From Object to Subject: Animals in Scientific Research -- 6. Clothing Ourselves in Stories of Love: Affect and Animal AdvocacyConclusion: Trouble in the (...)
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  24.  18
    In It for the Nonhuman Animals: Animal Welfare, Moral Certainty, and Disagreements.Nicola Taylor - 2004 - Society and Animals 12 (4):317-339.
    Based on three years' ethnographic research with animal sanctuary workers, this paper argues that a level of moral certainty drives and justifies many of the workers' actions and beliefs. Similar to the "missionary zeal" of nonhuman animal rights activists, this moral certainty divides the world into two neat categories: good for the animals and bad for the animals. This overriding certainty takes precedence over other concerns and pervades all aspects of sanctuary life, resulting in the breakdown (...)
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  25. Animal Century: A Celebration of Changing Attitudes to Animals.Mark Gold - 1998 - J. Carpenter.
     
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  26.  13
    Caring About Blood, Flesh, and Pain:Women's Standing in the Animal Protection Movement.Lyle Munro - 2001 - Society and Animals 9 (1):43-61.
    Using the results of a survey of animal rights activists, advocates, and supporters, the paper reveals much more convergence than divergence of attitudes and actions by male and female animal protectionists. Analysis of the divergence suggests that the differences between men and women in the movement are contingent upon such things as early socialization, gendered work and leisure patterns, affinity with companion animals, ambivalence about science, and a history of opposition to nonhuman animal abuse by (...)
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  27.  26
    Animal Rights and Human Morality.Bernard E. Rollin - 1981 - Prometheus Books.
  28. The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Noûs. Oxford University Press. pp. 425-434.
    More than twenty years after its original publication, The Case for Animal Rights is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
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  29. Animal Rights: Moral Theory and Practice.Mark Rowlands - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Animal rights and moral theories -- Arguing for one's species -- Utilitarianism and animals : Peter Singer's case for animal liberation -- Tom Regan : animal rights as natural rights -- Virtue ethics and animals -- Contractarianism and animal rights -- Animal minds.
     
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  30. Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions.Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Cass Sunstein and Martha Nussbaum bring together an all-star cast of contributors to explore the legal and political issues that underlie the campaign for animal rights and the opposition to it. Addressing ethical questions about ownership, protection against unjustified suffering, and the ability of animals to make their own choices free from human control, the authors offer numerous different perspectives on animal rights and animal welfare. They show that whatever one's ultimate conclusions, the relationship between (...)
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  31. 'In It for the Animals: Moral Certainty and Animal Welfare'.Nicola Taylor - 2004 - Society and Animals 12 (4):317-339.
    Based on three years' ethnographic research with animal sanctuary workers, this paper argues that a level of moral certainty drives and justifies many of the workers' actions and beliefs. Similar to the "missionary zeal" of nonhuman animal rights activists, this moral certainty divides the world into two neat categories: good for the animals and bad for the animals. This overriding certainty takes precedence over other concerns and pervades all aspects of sanctuary life, resulting in the breakdown (...)
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  32.  33
    Legal Personhood: Animals, Artificial Intelligence and the Unborn.Visa A. J. Kurki & Tomasz Pietrzykowski (eds.) - 2017 - Springer.
    This edited work collates novel contributions on contemporary topics that are related to human rights. The essays address analytic-descriptive questions, such as what legal personality actually means, and normative questions, such as who or what should be recognised as a legal person. As is well-known among jurists, the law has a special conception of personhood: corporations are persons, whereas slaves have traditionally been considered property rather than persons. This odd state of affairs has not garnered the interest of legal (...)
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  33. Animal Rights and Human Obligations.Tom Regan & Peter Singer (eds.) - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
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  34. What's Wrong with Animalby-Products?Gary E. Varner - 1994 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):7-17.
    Without looking beyond the conditions under which laying hens typically live in the contemporary U.S. egg industry, we can understand why the production and consumption of factory farmed eggs could be judged immoral. However, the question, What (if anything) is wrong with animal by-products? cannot always be adequately answered by looking at the conditions under which animals live out their productive lives. For the dairy industry looks benign in those terms, but if we look beyond the conditions under which (...)
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  35.  39
    Are Smelly Animals Happy Animals? Competing Definitions of Laboratory Animal Cruelty and Public Policy.Julian McAllister Groves - 1994 - Society and Animals 2 (2):125-144.
    Regulations surrounding laboratory animal care have tried to address aspects of an image of laboratory animal cruelty publicized by animal rights activists. This image of cruelty, however, is not consistent with the experiences of those charged with the day-to-day care of laboratory animals. This article examines the incongruities between the public image of cruelty to animals in laboratories as promoted by animal rights activists, and the experiences of laboratory animal care staff (...)
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  36. Animal Rights: A Philosophical Defence.Mark Rowlands - 1998 - St. Martin's Press.
    The question of the nature and extent of our moral obligations to non-human animals has featured prominently in recent moral debate. This book defends the novel position that a contradictarian moral theory can be used to justify the claim that animals possess a substantial and wide-ranging set of moral rights. Critiquing the rival accounts of Peter Singer and Tom Regan, this study shows how an influential form of the social contract idea can be extended to make sense of the (...)
     
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  37. Animal Rights and the Duty to Harm: When to Be a Harm Causing Deontologist.C. E. Abbate - 2020 - Journal for Ethics and Moral Philosophy 3 (1):5-26.
    An adequate theory of rights ought to forbid the harming of animals (human or nonhuman) to promote trivial interests of humans, as is often done in the animal-user industries. But what should the rights view say about situations in which harming some animals is necessary to prevent intolerable injustices to other animals? I develop an account of respectful treatment on which, under certain conditions, it’s justified to intentionally harm some individuals to prevent serious harm to others. This (...)
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  38.  78
    Animal Rights and Wrongs.Roger Scruton - 2000 - Metro in Association with Demos.
    This paperback edition is fully updated with new chapters on the livestoick crisis, fishing and BSE and a layman's guide introduction to philosophical concepts, ...
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  39. Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction.David DeGrazia - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides a general overview of the basic ethical and philosophical issues of animal rights. It asks questions such as: Do animals have moral rights? If so, what does this mean? What sorts of mental lives do animals have, and how should we understand welfare? By presenting models for understanding animals' moral status and rights, and examining their mental lives and welfare, David DeGrazia explores the implications for how we should treat animals in connection with (...)
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  40.  56
    Animal Rights, Human Wrongs: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy.Tom Regan - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Regan provides the theoretical framework that grounds a responsible pro-animal rights perspective, and ultimately explores how asking moral questions about other animals can lead to a better understanding of ourselves.
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  41. The Animal Rights Debate: Abolition or Regulation?Gary L. Francione & Robert Garner - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    Gary L. Francione is a law professor and leading philosopher of animal rights theory. Robert Garner is a political theorist specializing in the philosophy and politics of animal protection. Francione maintains that we have no moral justification for using nonhumans and argues that because animals are property—or economic commodities—laws or industry practices requiring "humane" treatment will, as a general matter, fail to provide any meaningful level of protection. Garner favors a version of animal rights that (...)
     
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  42. The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 1983 - University of California Press, C1983.
    More than twenty years after its original publication, _The Case for Animal Rights _is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
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  43. Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy.Kathy Rudy - 2013 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    The contemporary animal rights movement encompasses a wide range of sometimes-competing agendas from vegetarianism to animal liberation. For people for whom pets are family members—animal lovers outside the fray—extremist positions in which all human–animal interaction is suspect often discourage involvement in the movement to end cruelty to other beings. In _Loving Animals_, Kathy Rudy argues that in order to achieve such goals as ending animal testing and factory farming, activists need to be better (...)
     
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  44. Defending Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 2001
     
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  45. The Animal Rights Debate.Carl Cohen & Tom Regan - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Here, for the first time, the world's two leading authorities—Tom Regan, who argues for animal rights, and Carl Cohen, who argues against them—make their respective case before the public at large. The very terms of the debate will never be the same. This seminal moment in the history of the controversy over animal rights will influence the direction of this debate throughout the rest of the century.
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  46.  12
    Animal Rights Without Liberation: Applied Ethics and Human Obligations.Alastair Cochrane - 2012 - Columbia University Press.
    Moving beyond theory to the practical aspects of applied ethics, this pragmatic volume provides much-needed perspective on the realities and responsibilities of the human-animal relationship.
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  47. Animal Rights, Animal Minds, and Human Mindreading.Matteo Mameli & Lisa Bortolotti - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):84-89.
    Do non-human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non-human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. But the scientific studies by themselves do not (...)
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  48. Animal Rights and the Problem of R-Strategists.Kyle Johannsen - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):333-45.
    Wild animal reproduction poses an important moral problem for animal rights theorists. Many wild animals give birth to large numbers of uncared-for offspring, and thus child mortality rates are far higher in nature than they are among human beings. In light of this reproductive strategy – traditionally referred to as the ‘r-strategy’ – does concern for the interests of wild animals require us to intervene in nature? In this paper, I argue that animal rights theorists (...)
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  49. Beyond Animal Rights: A Feminist Caring Ethic for the Treatment of Animals.Josephine Donovan & Carol J. Adams (eds.) - 1996 - Continuum.
  50.  16
    Animal Rights and Human Morality.Richard J. Hall - 1983 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (1):135.
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