Results for 'Palliative care'

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  1. Please Note That Not All Books Mentioned on This List Will Be Reviewed.Researching Palliative Care - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (371).
  2.  31
    Respect for Persons, Autonomy and Palliative Care.Simon Woods - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):243-253.
    .This paper explores some of the values that underpin health care and how these relate more specifically to the values and ethics of palliative care. The paper focuses on the concept of autonomy because autonomy has emerged as a foundational concept in contemporary health care ethics and because this is an opportunity to scratch the surface of this concept in order to reveal something of its complexity, a necessary precaution when applying the concept to the context (...)
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  3.  38
    Palliative Care and the QALY Problem.Jonathan Hughes - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (4):289-301.
    Practitioners of palliative care often argue for more resources to be provided by the state in order to lessen its reliance on charitable funding and to enable the services currently provided to some of those with terminal illnesses to be provided to all who would benefit from it. However, this is hard to justify on grounds of cost-effectiveness, since it is in the nature of palliative care that the benefits it brings to its patients are of (...)
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  4.  40
    Evaluating Palliative Care: Facilitating Reflexive Dialgoues About an Ambiguous Concept. [REVIEW]Tineke A. Abma - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):261-276.
    Palliation is a relatively new concept that is used in connection with the integral care provided to those who are unable to recover from their illness. The specific meaning of the concept has not been clearly defined. This article explores the possibilities offered by a responsive approach to evaluation that can facilitate a reflexive dialogue on this ambiguous concept. In doing so it draws on a case study of a palliative care project in a Dutch health (...) authority. The article begins with an overview of the characteristics of a responsive approach to evaluation and addresses interpretative, representational and practical dilemmas. It goes on to present a series of dialogues between health professionals, informal caregivers, patients and evaluators. These dialogues take the form of juxtaposed stories, transcribed conversations and interpretations. Finally, the learning experiences are summarised and the appropriateness of the responsive approach to evaluate palliative care is discussed. (shrink)
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  5.  57
    Moral Problems in Palliative Care Practice: A Qualitative Study.Maaike A. Hermsen & Henk A. M. J. ten Have - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):263-272.
    Clarifying and analysing moral problems arising in the practice of palliative care was the objective of participatory observations in five palliative care settings. The results of these observations will be described in this contribution. The moral problems palliative caregivers have to deal with in their daily routines will be explained by comparison with the findings of a previously performed literature study. The specific differences in the manifestation of moral problems in the different palliative (...) settings will be highlighted as well. (shrink)
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  6.  23
    Can Curative or Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Withheld or Withdrawn? The Opinions and Views of Indian Palliative-Care Nurses and Physicians.Joris Gielen, Sushma Bhatnagar, Seema Mishra, Arvind K. Chaturvedi, Harmala Gupta, Ambika Rajvanshi, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):5-18.
    Introduction: Decisions to withdraw or withhold curative or life-sustaining treatment can have a huge impact on the symptoms which the palliative-care team has to control. Palliative-care patients and their relatives may also turn to palliative-care physicians and nurses for advice regarding these treatments. We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians’ attitudes towards withholding and withdrawal of curative or life-sustaining treatment. Method: From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and (...)
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  7.  62
    Nozick’s Experience Machine and Palliative Care: Revisiting Hedonism. [REVIEW]Y. Michael Barilan - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):399-407.
    In refutation of hedonism, Nozick offered a hypothetical thought experiment, known as the Experience Machine. This paper maintains that end-of-life-suffering of the kind that is resistant to state-of-the-art palliation provides a conceptually equal experiment which validates Nozick’s observations and conclusions. The observation that very many terminal patients who suffer terribly do no wish for euthanasia or terminal sedation is incompatible with motivational hedonism. Although irreversible vegetative state and death are equivalently pain-free, very many people loath the former even at the (...)
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  8.  41
    Euthanasia and Palliative Care in the Netherlands: An Analysis of the Latest Developments.Bert Gordijn & Rien Janssens - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (3):195-207.
    This article discusses the latest developments regarding euthanasia and palliative care in the Netherlands. On the one hand, a legally codified practice of euthanasia has been established. On the other hand, there has been a strong development of palliative care. The combination of these simultaneous processes seems to be rather unique. This contribution first focuses on these remarkable developments. Subsequently, the analysis concentrates on the question of how these new developments have influenced the ethical debate.
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  9.  42
    Palliative Care for the Terminally Ill in America: The Consideration of QALYs, Costs, and Ethical Issues.Y. Tony Yang & Margaret M. Mahon - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):411-416.
    The drive for cost-effective use of medical interventions has advantages, but can also be challenging in the context of end-of-life palliative treatments. A quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) provides a common currency to assess the extent of the benefits gained from a variety of interventions in terms of health-related quality of life and survival for the patient. However, since it is in the nature of end-of-life palliative care that the benefits it brings to its patients are of short duration, (...)
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  10.  32
    Questions and Answers on the Belgian Model of Integral End-of-Life Care: Experiment? Prototype?: “Eu-Euthanasia”: The Close Historical, and Evidently Synergistic, Relationship Between Palliative Care and Euthanasia in Belgium: An Interview With a Doctor Involved in the Early Development of Both and Two of His Successors.Jan L. Bernheim, Wim Distelmans, Arsène Mullie & Michael A. Ashby - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (4):507-529.
    This article analyses domestic and foreign reactions to a 2008 report in the British Medical Journal on the complementary and, as argued, synergistic relationship between palliative care and euthanasia in Belgium. The earliest initiators of palliative care in Belgium in the late 1970s held the view that access to proper palliative care was a precondition for euthanasia to be acceptable and that euthanasia and palliative care could, and should, develop together. Advocates of (...)
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  11.  86
    From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill.Y. Michael Barilan - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):165-181.
    This paper aims at explicating a theory of hope that is also suitable for gravely ill people and based on virtue ethics, research in the psychology of “well-being,” and the philosophy of palliative care. The working hypotheses of the theory are that hope is conditioned neither by past events nor by present needs, but is not necessarily oriented toward the future, especially the distant future; that hope is related to personal agency and to freedom; and that hope is (...)
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  12.  92
    On the Notion of Home and the Goals of Palliative Care.Wim Dekkers - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):335-349.
    The notion of home is well known from our everyday experience, and plays a crucial role in all kinds of narratives about human life, but is hardly ever systematically dealt with in the philosophy of medicine and health care. This paper is based upon the intuitively positive connotation of the term “home.” By metaphorically describing the goal of palliative care as “the patient’s coming home,” it wants to contribute to a medical humanities approach of medicine. It is (...)
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  13. Rawlsian Justice and Palliative Care.Carl Knight & Andreas Albertsen - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (8):536-542.
    Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcare. We argue that one prominent approach, the Rawlsian approach developed by Norman Daniels, is unable to provide such reasons and such care. This is (...)
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  14.  23
    Addressing the Concerns Surrounding Continuous Deep Sedation in Singapore and Southeast Asia: A Palliative Care Approach.Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):461-475.
    The application of continuous deep sedation in the treatment of intractable suffering at the end of life continues to be tied to a number of concerns that have negated its use in palliative care. Part of the resistance towards use of this treatment option of last resort has been the continued association of CDS with physician-associated suicide and/or euthanasia, which is compounded by a lack clinical guidelines and a failure to cite this treatment under the aegis of a (...)
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  15.  23
    Be Known, Be Available, Be Mutual: A Qualitative Ethical Analysis of Social Values in Rural Palliative Care[REVIEW]Barbara Pesut, Joan L. Bottorff & Carole A. Robinson - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):19-.
    Background: Although attention to healthcare ethics in rural areas has increased, specific focus on rural palliative care is still largely under-studied and under-theorized. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the values informing good palliative care from rural individuals' perspectives. Methods: We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study in four rural communities in Western Canada. Each community had a population of 10, 000 or less and was located at least a three hour (...)
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  16.  23
    Psychosocial Determinants of Physicians’ Intention to Practice Euthanasia in Palliative Care.Mireille Lavoie, Gaston Godin, Lydi-Anne Vézina-Im, Danielle Blondeau, Isabelle Martineau & Louis Roy - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):6.
    Euthanasia remains controversial in Canada and an issue of debate among physicians. Most studies have explored the opinion of health professionals regarding its legalization, but have not investigated their intentions when faced with performing euthanasia. These studies are also considered atheoretical. The purposes of the present study were to fill this gap in the literature by identifying the psychosocial determinants of physicians’ intention to practice euthanasia in palliative care and verifying whether respecting the patient’s autonomy is important for (...)
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  17.  66
    Palliative Care, Public Health and Justice: Setting Priorities in Resource Poor Countries.Craig Blinderman - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):105-110.
    Many countries have not considered palliative care a public health problem. With limited resources, disease-oriented therapies and prevention measures take priority. In this paper, I intend to describe the moral framework for considering palliative care as a public health priority in resource-poor countries. A distributive theory of justice for health care should consider integrative palliative care as morally required as it contributes to improving normal functioning and preserving opportunities for the individual. For patients (...)
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  18.  76
    Quality of Life Considered as Well-Being: Views From Philosophy and Palliative Care Practice.Gert Olthuis & Wim Dekkers - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (4):307-337.
    The main measure of quality of life is well-being. The aim of this article is to compare insights about well-being from contemporary philosophy with the practice-related opinions of palliative care professionals. In the first part of the paper two philosophical theories on well-being are introduced: Sumner’s theory of authentic happiness and Griffin’s theory of prudential perfectionism. The second part presents opinions derived from interviews with 19 professional palliative caregivers. Both the well-being of patients and the well-being of (...)
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  19.  85
    Transmural Palliative Care by Means of Teleconsultation: A Window of Opportunities and New Restrictions. [REVIEW]Jelle van Gurp, Martine van Selm, Evert van Leeuwen & Jeroen Hasselaar - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):12-.
    Background: Audio-visual teleconsultation is expected to help home-based palliative patients, hospital-based palliative care professionals, and family physicians to jointly design better, pro-active care. Consensual knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of teleconsultation in transmural palliative care is, however, largely lacking.This paper aims at describing elements of both the physical workplace and the cultural-social context of the palliative care practice, which are imperative for the use of teleconsultation technologies. Methods: A semi-structured expert meeting (...)
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  20.  67
    The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care.H. Colby William, John Lantos Constance Dahlin & Myra Christopher John Carney - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (2):117-131.
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal (...) care through the health care spectrum. Within the guidelines there are eight domains to the provision of palliative care. This article focuses on the last, but very significant Domain 8—Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. (shrink)
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  21.  27
    Normativity Unbound: Liminality in Palliative Care Ethics.Hillel Braude - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (2):107-122.
    This article applies the anthropological concept of liminality to reconceptualize palliative care ethics. Liminality possesses both spatial and temporal dimensions. Both these aspects are analyzed to provide insight into the intersubjective relationship between patient and caregiver in the context of palliative care. Aristotelian practical wisdom, or phronesis, is considered to be the appropriate model for palliative care ethics, provided it is able to account for liminality. Moreover, this article argues for the importance of liminality (...)
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  22.  21
    Beyond the Biomedical Model.Palliative Care - 2005 - HEC Forum 17 (3):227-236.
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  23. Parental Experience of Hope in Pediatric Palliative Care: Critical Reflections on an Exemplar of Parents of a Child with Trisomy 18.Marta Szabat - 2020 - Nursing Inquiry 2 (2).
    The purpose of this study is to analyze the experience of hope that appears in a parent's blog presenting everyday life while caring for a child with Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). The author, Rebekah Peterson, began her blog on 17 March 2011 and continues to post information on her son Aaron's care. The analysis of hope in the blog is carried out using a mixed methodology: initial and focused coding using Charmaz's constructed grounded theory and elements of Colaizzi's method. (...)
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  24.  99
    The Philosophy of Palliative Care: Critique and Reconstruction.Fiona Randall - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    It is a philosophy of patient care, and is therefore open to critique and evaluation.Using the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine Third Edition as their ...
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  25. Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion.Fiona Randall - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Palliative care is a recent branch of health care. The doctors, nurses, and other professionals involved in it took their inspiration from the medieval idea of the hospice, but have now extended their expertise to every area of health care: surgeries, nursing homes, acute wards, and the community. This has happened during a period when patients wish to take more control over their own lives and deaths, resources have become scarce, and technology has created controversial life-prolonging (...)
     
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  26. The Ethics of Palliative Care: European Perspectives.H. ten Have & David Clark (eds.) - 2002 - Open University Press.
    As palliative care develops across many of the countries of Europe, we find that it continues to raise important ethical challenges. Palliative care practice requires ethical sensitivity and understanding. At the same time the very existence of palliative care calls for ethical explanation. Ethics and palliative care meet over some vital issues: 'the good death', sedation at the end of life, requests for euthanasia, futile treatment, and the role of research. Yet (...) care appears uncertain about its goals and there is evidence that its ethical underpinnings are changing. Likewise, the moral problems of palliative care are only partly served by the four 'principles' of modern bioethics. This innovative book, with contributions by clinicians, ethicists, philosophers and social scientists, provides the first ever picture of palliative care ethics in the European context. It will be of interest to those involved in the delivery and management of palliative care services, as well as to students and researchers. (shrink)
     
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  27.  40
    Ärztliche Verantwortung Gegenüber Palliativpatienten Unter Dem Neuen Paradigma der KundenorientierungPhysician Responsibility Towards Palliative Care Patients in Regard to the New Customer Orientation Paradigm.Katharina Seibel, Franziska Krause & Gerhild Becker - 2014 - Ethik in der Medizin 26 (1):47-58.
    Ein gelungenes Arzt-Patient-Verhältnis, das auf gegenseitigem Vertrauen und ärztlicher Verantwortung basiert, ist ein zentraler Bestandteil des Ideals der ärztlichen Profession. Aktuell wird vielfach von einem neuen „ökonomischen Paradigma“ in der Medizin gesprochen, das dieses Verhältnis vermeintlich unterminiert. Als ein wichtiges Merkmal dieses Paradigmas gilt das Verständnis vom Patienten als Kunden, der charakterisiert ist durch seine Selbstbestimmung bzw. Autonomie. Wie stellt sich die Kundenrolle nun aber bei vulnerablen Patientengruppen dar, die in ihrer Autonomie eingeschränkt sind, und was bedeutet dies wiederum für (...)
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  28.  24
    New Frontiers in the Future of Palliative Care: Real-World Bioethical Dilemmas and Axiology of Clinical Practice.Uría Guevara-López, Myriam M. Altamirano-Bustamante & Carlos Viesca-Treviño - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):11.
    In our time there is growing interest in developing a systematic approach to oncologic patients and end-of-life care. An important goal within this domain is to identify the values and ethical norms that guide physicians’ decisions and their recourse to technological aids to preserve life. Though crucial, this objective is not easy to achieve.
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  29. Palliative Care Ethics a Companion for All Specialties.Fiona Randall & R. S. Downie - 1999
     
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  30.  42
    Palliative Care for People with Alzheimer's Disease.Margaret M. Mahon & Jeanne M. Sorrell - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (2):110-120.
  31.  22
    Philosophizing Social Justice in Rural Palliative Care: Hayek's Moral Stone?Barbara Pesut, Frances Beswick, Carole A. Robinson & Joan L. Bottorff - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):46-55.
  32.  38
    The Morality of Experience Machines for Palliative and End of Life Care.Dan Weijers - 2017 - In Mark Silcox (ed.), Experience Machines: The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 183-201.
    Experience machines, popularized in print by Robert Nozick and on the screen by the Wachowskis’ film The Matrix, provide highly or perfectly realistic experiences that are more pleasant and less painful than those generated in real life.1 The recent surge in virtual reality and neuro-prosthetic technologies is making the creation of real-world experience machines seem inevitable and perhaps imminent.2 Given the likelihood of the near-future availability of such machines, it behooves ethicists to consider the moral status of their potential uses. (...)
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  33. Embracing Life & Facing Death: A Jewish Guide to Palliative Care.Daniel S. Brenner (ed.) - 2002 - Clal.
     
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  34.  77
    Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice.Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end (...)
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  35.  25
    Hospice Ethics: Policy and Practice in Palliative Care.Timothy Kirk & Bruce Jennings (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This book identifies and explores ethical themes in the structure and delivery of hospice care in the United States. As the fastest growing sector in the US healthcare system, in which over forty percent of patients who die each year receive care in their final weeks of life, hospice care presents complex ethical opportunities and challenges for patients, families, clinicians, and administrators. Thirteen original chapters, written by seventeen hospice experts, offer guidance and analysis that promotes best ethical (...)
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  36.  8
    Death Without Distress? The Taboo of Suffering in Palliative Care.Nina Streeck - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):343-351.
    Palliative care names as one of its central aims to prevent and relieve suffering. Following the concept of “total pain”, which was first introduced by Cicely Saunders, PC not only focuses on the physical dimension of pain but also addresses the patient’s psychological, social, and spiritual suffering. However, the goal to relieve suffering can paradoxically lead to a taboo of suffering and imply adverse consequences. Two scenarios are presented: First, PC providers sometimes might fail their own ambitions. If (...)
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  37.  18
    Suffering and Dying Well: On the Proper Aim of Palliative Care.Govert den Hartogh - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):413-424.
    In recent years a large empirical literature has appeared on suffering at the end of life. In this literature it is recognized that suffering has existential and social dimensions in addition to physical and psychological ones. The non-physical aspects of suffering, however, are still understood as pathological symptoms, to be reduced by therapeutical interventions as much as possible. But suffering itself and the negative emotional states it consists of are intentional states of mind which, as such, make cognitive claims: they (...)
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  38.  18
    Solicitude: Balancing Compassion and Empowerment in a Relational Ethics of Hope—an Empirical-Ethical Study in Palliative Care.Erik Olsman, Dick Willems & Carlo Leget - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):11-20.
    The ethics of hope has often been understood as a conflict between duties: do not lie versus do not destroy hope. However, such a way of framing the ethics of hope may easily place healthcare professionals at the side of realism and patients at the side of hope. That leaves unexamined relational dimensions of hope. The objective of this study was to describe a relational ethics of hope based on the perspectives of palliative care patients, their family members (...)
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  39.  5
    Affirming Life in the Face of Death: Ricoeur’s Living Up to Death as a Modern Ars Moriendi and a Lesson for Palliative Care.Ds Frits de Lange - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):509-518.
    In his posthumously published Living Up to Death Paul Ricoeur left an impressive testimony on what it means to live at a high old age with death approaching. In this article I present him as a teacher who reminds us of valuable lessons taught by patients in palliative care and their caretakers who accompany them on their way to death, and also as a guide in our search for a modern ars moriendi, after—what many at least experience as—the (...)
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  40.  75
    Physician-Assisted Suicide in the United States: The Underlying Factors in Technology, Health Care and Palliative Medicine – Part One.Robert F. Rizzo - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (3):277-289.
    In an age of rapid advances inlife-prolonging treatment, patients and caregivers areincreasingly facing tensions in making end-of-lifedecisions. An examination of the history of healthcare in the United States reveals technological,economic, and medical factors that have contributed tothe problems of terminal care and consequently to themovement of assisted suicide. The movement has itsroots in at least two fundamental perceptions andexpectations. In the age of technological medicineenergized by the profit motive, dying comes at a highprice in suffering and in personal economic (...)
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  41.  5
    Dying Individuals and Suffering Populations: Applying a Population-Level Bioethics Lens to Palliative Care in Humanitarian Contexts: Before, During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic.Keona Jeane Wynne, Mila Petrova & Rachel Coghlan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):514-525.
    BackgroundHumanitarian crises and emergencies, events often marked by high mortality, have until recently excluded palliative care—a specialty focusing on supporting people with serious or terminal illness or those nearing death. In the COVID-19 pandemic, palliative care has received unprecedented levels of societal attention. Unfortunately, this has not been enough to prevent patients dying alone, relatives not being able to say goodbye and palliative care being used instead of intensive care due to resource limitations. (...)
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  42.  8
    Ethical End-of-Life Palliative Care: Response to Riisfeldt.Heidi Giebel - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):51-52.
    In a recent article, 1 Riisfeldt attempts to show that the principle of double effect is unsound as an ethical principle and problematic in its application to palliative opioid and sedative use in end-of-life care. Specifically, he claims that routine, non-lethal opioid and sedative administration may be “intrinsically bad” by PDE’s standards, continuous deep palliative sedation should be treated as a bad effect akin to death for purposes of PDE, PDE cannot coherently be applied in cases where (...)
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  43.  81
    Medical Futility at the End of Life: The Perspectives of Intensive Care and Palliative Care Clinicians.Ralf J. Jox, Andreas Schaider, Georg Marckmann & Gian Domenico Borasio - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):540-545.
    Objectives Medical futility at the end of life is a growing challenge to medicine. The goals of the authors were to elucidate how clinicians define futility, when they perceive life-sustaining treatment (LST) to be futile, how they communicate this situation and why LST is sometimes continued despite being recognised as futile. Methods The authors reviewed ethics case consultation protocols and conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 physicians and 11 nurses from adult intensive and palliative care units at a tertiary (...)
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  44.  21
    Of Dilemmas and Tensions: A Qualitative Study of Palliative Care Physicians’ Positions Regarding Voluntary Active Euthanasia in Quebec, Canada.Emmanuelle Bélanger, Anna Towers, David Kenneth Wright, Yuexi Chen, Golda Tradounsky & Mary Ellen Macdonald - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):48-53.
    ObjectivesIn 2015, the Province of Quebec, Canada passed a law that allowed voluntary active euthanasia. Palliative care stakeholders in Canada have been largely opposed to euthanasia, yet there is little research about their views. The research question guiding this study was the following: How do palliative care physicians in Quebec position themselves regarding the practice of VAE in the context of the new provincial legislation?MethodsWe used interpretive description, an inductive methodology to answer research questions about clinical (...)
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  45.  18
    Towards a Palliative Care Approach in Psychiatry: Do We Need a New Definition?Anna Lindblad, Gert Helgesson & Manne Sjöstrand - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):26-30.
    Psychiatry today is mainly practised within a curative framework. However, many mental disorders are persistent and negatively affect quality of life as well as life expectancy. This tension between treatment goals and the actual illness trajectory has evoked a growing academic interest in ‘palliative psychiatry’, namely the application of a palliative care approach in patients with severe persistent mental illness. Recently, Trachsel et al presented a working definition of palliative psychiatry. This first official attempt to capture (...)
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  46.  48
    Burnout in Palliative Care: A Systematic Review.Sandra Martins Pereira, António M. Fonseca & Ana Sofia Carvalho - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (3):317-326.
    Burnout is a phenomenon characterized by fatigue and frustration, usually related to work stress and dedication to a cause, a way of life that does not match the person’s expectations. Although it seems to be associated with risk factors stemming from a professional environment, this problem may affect any person. Palliative care is provided in a challenging environment, where professionals often have to make demanding ethical decisions and deal with death and dying. This article reports on the findings (...)
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  47.  5
    Refractory Suffering at the End of Life and the Assisted Dying Debate: An Interview Study with Palliative Care Nurses and Doctors.Kristine Espegren Gustad, Åsta Askjer, Per Nortvedt, Olav Magnus S. Fredheim & Morten Magelssen - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics.
    BackgroundHow often does refractory suffering, which is suffering due to symptoms that cannot be adequately controlled, occur at the end of life in modern palliative care? What are the causes of su...
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  48. The Rose of Sharon: What is the Ideal Timing for Palliative Care Consultation Versus Ethics Consultation?Jennifer La Via & David Schiedermayer - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (3):231.
    Ethics committees and palliative care consultants can function in a complementary fashion, seamlessly and effectively. Ethics committees can “air” and help resolves issues, and palliative care consultants can use a low-key, longitudinal approach.
     
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  49.  42
    The Devil's Choice: Re-Thinking Law, Ethics, and Symptom Relief in Palliative Care.Roger S. Magnusson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):559-569.
    Health professionals do not always have the luxury of making “right” choices. This article introduces the “devil's choice” as a metaphor to describe medical choices that arise in circumstances where all the available options are both unwanted and perverse. Using the devil's choice, the paper criticizes the principle of double effect and provides a re-interpretation of the conventional legal and ethical account of symptom relief in palliative care.
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    The Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS): A Simple Method for the Assessment of Palliative Care Patients.Eduardo Bruera, Norma Kuehn, Melvin J. Miller, Pal Selmser & K. Macmillan - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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