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Robin R. Wang [16]Robin Wang [10]
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Robin R. Wang
Loyola Marymount University
  1. Zhou Dunyi's Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate Explained (Taijitu Shuo) : A Construction of the Confucian Metaphysics.Robin Wang - 2005 - Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (3):307-323.
  2. Di Er Ci Qimeng 第二次启蒙 (The Second Enlightenment) by Wang Zhihe 王治河 and Fan Meijun 樊美筠 (Review).Robin R. Wang - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):449-450.
    Di er ci Qimeng (The second Enlightenment), by Wang Zhihe and Fan Meijun, is a timely book in Chinese about constructing a philosophical and practical way to contend with China's postmodernization. It combines Whitehead's process philosophy with a focus on Chinese modernity in order to map out a desirable postmodern society. It addresses the problem on several dimensions from policy making to basic value systems. The range of themes can be seen from the topics of the book's twelve chapters: (1) (...)
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  3. Dong Zhongshu's Transformation of Yin-Yang Theory and Contesting of Gender Identity.Robin Wang - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):209 - 231.
    Dong Zhongshu (Tung Chung-shu) (179-104 B.C.E.) was the first prominent Confucian to integrate yin-yang theory into Confucianism. His constructive effort not only generates a new perspective on yin and yang, it also involves implications beyond its explicit contents. First, Dong changes the natural harmony (he ネᄆ) of yin and yang to an imposed unity (he 合). Second, he identifies yang with human nature (xing) and benevolence (ren), and yin with emotion (qing) and greed (tan). Taken together, these novelties grant a (...)
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  4.  34
    Dong Zhongshu's Transformation Of.Robin Wang - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2).
    : Dong Zhongshu (Tung Chung-shu) (179–104 B.C.E.) was the first prominent Confucian to integrate yin-yang theory into Confucianism. His constructive effort not only generates a new perspective on yin and yang, it also involves implications beyond its explicit contents. First, Dong changes the natural harmony of yin and yang to an imposed unity Second, he identifies yang with human nature (xing) and benevolence (ren), and yin with emotion (qing) and greed (tan). Taken together, these two novelties grant a philosophical basis (...)
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  5.  35
    The Virtuous Body at Work: The Ethical Life as Qi 氣 in Motion.Robin Wang - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):339-351.
    This essay argues that moral self-cultivation as described in the Confucian tradition involves the cultivation of the body. Preparing the body in certain ways, perhaps by making it healthy, is a necessary part of moral self-cultivation. This claim includes: (a) nourishing the body in a proper way is a first step in moral self-cultivation, and the bodily care is instrumentally valuable to one’s flourishing life; (b) making and keeping a healthy body is partly constitutive of a moral well-being and hence (...)
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  6.  61
    Reconceiving Women's Equality in China: A Critical Examination of Models of Sex Equality by Lijun Yuan.Robin R. Wang - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):217-220.
  7.  11
    Globalizing the Heart of the Dragon: The Impact of Technology on Confucian Ethical Values.Robin R. Wang - 2002 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (4):553–569.
  8.  4
    In the Shadows of the Dao: Laozi, the Sage, and the Daodejing by Thomas Michael.Robin R. Wang - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (2):654-656.
    The Daodejing is a fascinating text that has captivated scholarly minds and the popular imagination for centuries. Is it a manual for self-cultivation and government, a work of philosophy providing a metaphysical account of reality, or a treatise for deep mystical insight? Is it perhaps an ethical masterpiece intended for the ruling class, with concrete strategic suggestions aimed at remedying the moral and political turmoil surrounding Warring States China? Or is it a way of life characterized by simplicity, calmness, and (...)
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  9.  44
    Kundao坤道: A Lived Body in Female Daoism.Robin R. Wang - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):277-292.
  10.  46
    Ideal Womanhood in Chinese Thought and Culture.Robin R. Wang - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (8):635-644.
    Based on original texts this essay attempts to describe two main conceptual constructions and practices of ideal womanhood in the Chinese tradition: Lienu (exemplary women) as the Confucian social inspirations for women and Kundao (way of female) as the Daoist commitment to bodily and spiritual transformation.
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  11.  13
    Exemplary Women of Early China: The “Lienü Zhuan” of Liu Xiang. Translated and Edited by Anne Behnke Kinney. New York : Columbia University Press, 2014. Pp. Lvi + 323. $105 ; $35. [REVIEW]Robin R. Wang - 2015 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 135 (2):417-418.
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  12. Yinyang (Yin-Yang).Robin R. Wang - 2006 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  13.  34
    Zhang, Zailin 張再林, Traditional Chinese Philosophy as the Philosophy of the Body 作爲身體哲學的中國古代哲學.Robin R. Wang - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):113-116.
  14.  33
    Overcoming Our Evil: Human Nature and Spiritual Exercises in Xunzi and Augustine – by Aaron Stalnaker.Robin R. Wang - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):311–314.
  15.  6
    Overcoming Our Evil: Human Nature and Spiritual Exercises in Xunzi and Augustine – By Aaron Stalnaker.Robin R. Wang - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):311-314.
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  16.  22
    Women and Confucian Cultures in Premodern China, Korea, and Japan.Robin R. Wang - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (1):149–152.
  17.  11
    Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light (Review).Robin Wang - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (1):111-114.
  18.  14
    Littlejohn, Ronnie L. , Daoism: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Robin R. Wang - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):241-244.
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  19. Can Zhuangzi Make Confucians Laugh? : Emotion, Propriety, and the Role of Laughter.Robin R. Wang - 2010 - In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
     
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  20.  1
    Review of Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light by Franklin Perkins. [REVIEW]Robin Wang - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (1):111-114.
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  21. Book Review. [REVIEW]Robin Wang - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9:241-244.
    Zhang, Zailin 張再林, Traditional Chinese Philosophy as the Philosophy of the Body 作爲身體哲學的中國古代哲學 Beijing 北京: Zhongguo Shehui Kexue Chubanshe 中國社會出版社, 2008, 15+ 308 pages.
     
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  22.  28
    Chinese Philosophy in an Era of Globalization.Robin Wang (ed.) - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    This book treats Chinese philosophy today as a global project, presenting the work of both Chinese and Western philosophers.
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  23. Performing the Meanings of Dao : A Possible Pedagogical Strategy for Teaching Cinese Philosophy.Robin R. Wang - 2009 - In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.
     
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  24. Yinyang: The Way of Heaven and Earth in Chinese Thought and Culture.Robin R. Wang - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    The concept of yinyang lies at the heart of Chinese thought and culture. The relationship between these two opposing, yet mutually dependent, forces is symbolized in the familiar black and white symbol that has become an icon in popular culture across the world. The real significance of yinyang is, however, more complex and subtle. This brilliant and comprehensive analysis by one of the leading authorities in the field captures the richness and multiplicity of the meanings and applications of yinyang, including (...)
     
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