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  1. Meritocracy as an Ideology for Neoliberalism: A Korean Case.Jiho Oh - 2024 - Journal of of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 41:65-84.
    This paper considers meritocracy as a new social problem in Korea that has emerged since the IMF crisis in 1997. Drawing upon Daniel Markovitz’ recent analysis of meritocracy in America, I emphasize the connection between the neoliberalization of society and the popularization of the belief in meritocratic justice. I pay particular attention to the controversy over the conversion of irregular workers at the Incheon International Airport Corporation into regular employees and show that this severe conflict among people who do not (...)
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  2. The Psychology of a Sacrifice: Seen through Yulgok Yi I’s “Treatise on Death, Life, Ghosts, and Spirits”.Shyun Ahn - 2023 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 39:157-178.
    In his “Treatise on Death, Life, Ghosts, and Spirits” (Sasaeng gwisin chaek 死生 鬼神策), Yulgok Yi I (1536-1584) rejects the Buddhist accounts of an afterlife because the dead have neither vital stuff (gi 氣; C. qi) nor consciousness (jigak 知覺; C. zhijue) when their death is natural and complete. Without these, there can neither be reward nor retribution, which is the basis of an afterlife. Yet, at the same time, Yulgok commends Confucian sacrifices for the dead. When there is utmost (...)
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  3. Understanding human nature through taste: Dasan Jeong Yak‐yong's account of human‐nature‐as‐taste.Dobin Choi - 2023 - Philosophical Forum 54 (4):315-331.
    This essay investigates Dasan Jeong Yak‐yong's (1762–1836) account of human‐nature‐as‐taste, by comparing his commentaries on significant chapters in the Mengzi to Zhu Xi's commentaries. Dasan argues that human nature is understood through giho, taste sentiments and desires, and not as Principle (li). I first introduce Dasan's account of human‐nature‐as‐taste in his commentaries to 3A1 and 7A4. Next, I argue that giho is most appropriately translated as “taste,” because this term captures the dispositional characteristics of giho as a mental faculty as (...)
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  4. Juche in the Broader Context of Korean Philosophy.Hannah H. Kim - 2023 - Philosophical Forum (4):287-302.
    There is ongoing debate on whether Juche (주체/主體), the North Korean state ideology, is indigenous, Marxist-Leninist, or Confucian—or if it’s a real philosophy at all. In this article, I introduce Juche and show how characteristics that philosophers identify to be unique or pronounced in premodern Korean philosophy can be found in Juche as well. Intellectual adaptation, pragmaticism, and an emphasis on continual improvement are prominent in both premodern Korean thought and Juche. Juche should be understood as a politically inflected outgrowth (...)
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  5. Defending Juche Against an Uncharitable Analysis.Hannah H. Kim - 2023 - Apa Studies: Asian and Asian American Philosophy 22 (2):12-17.
    In this article, I aim to do two things: first, introduce Juche, the official philosophy of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (“North Korea”), and second, defend Juche against Alzo David-West’s allegation that it is a nonsensical philosophy. I organize David-West’s complaints into two major strands—that Juche’s axiom is too vague to be of philosophical use and that Juche makes too stark a distinction between human vs. everything else—and offer responses to both strands. My goal isn’t to defend the regime, (...)
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  6. The Moral and Religious Thought of Yi Hwang (Toegye): A Study of Korean Neo-Confucian Ethics and Spirituality by Edward Y.J. Ching (review).Maria Hasfeldt Long - 2023 - Philosophy East and West 73 (2):1-3.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:The Moral and Religious Thought of Yi Hwang (Toegye): A Study of Korean Neo-Confucian Ethics and Spirituality by Edward Y.J. ChingMaria Hasfeldt Long (bio)The Moral and Religious Thought of Yi Hwang (Toegye): A Study of Korean Neo-Confucian Ethics and Spirituality. By Edward Y.J. Ching. Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021. Pp. vii + 204. Hardcover $99.00, isbn 978-3-030-77923-8.In recent years, the study of Korean Neo-Confucianism as an international field has (...)
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  7. Dasan’s Philosophy of Law.Gordon B. Mower - 2023 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 39:129-156.
    In general, Confucians have taken a dim view of the law. They have felt warranted in this view by a reading of Confucius’ Analects 2.3 in which the Master apparently disparages law-centered governance. Two great Confucian philosophers, however, Zhu Xi and Jeong Yakyong (widely known by his pen name, Dasan), view the role of law in society differently. Like all Confucians, they teach the cultivation of virtue, but alongside building social harmony through ritual and good character, these two philosophers perceive (...)
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  8. Culture in Anger Disorder as Culture-Bound Syndrome.Keunchang Oh - 2023 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 40:133-155.
    For many, anger has been seen as irrationality, even as illness. But it seems that anger-related disorder and its culture-relatedness have not receive much attention in psychiatry. Like backward-looking ressentiment, hwabyeong 火病can be literally translated into anger disorder. In this paper, I examine the notion of anger and culture with the help of considering the case of hwabyeong as a Korean culture-bound syndrome (hereafter, CBS). Drawing on historical changes in the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and cases (...)
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  9. The Way of Humanity: Confucian Wisdom for an Opening World, Teachings of the Korean Philosopher, Haengchon (2nd edition).Edward R. Canda - 2022 - Lawrence: University of Kansas Libraries.
    The Way of Humanity, second edition, presents a Confucian vision for personal and social transformation intended to bring about a worldwide social order of harmony, dignity, and justice for all peoples, beyond divisive sectarianism and nationalism. It is based on ideals for human flourishing gleaned from Confucian and Neo-Confucian thought as distilled by a highly respected elder philosopher in South Korea, Yi Dong Jun, PhD (Haengchon, literary name). He is Professor Emeritus of the College of Confucian Studies and Eastern Philosophy (...)
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  10. Metaphors in Neo-Confucian Korean philosophy.Hannah H. Kim - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 80 (3):368–373.
    A metaphor is an effective way to show how something is to be conceived. In this article, I look at two Neo-Confucian Korean philosophical contexts—the Four-Seven debate and Book of the Imperial Pivot—and suggest that metaphors are philosophically expedient in two further contexts: when both intellect and emotion must be addressed; and when the aim of philosophizing is to produce behavioral change. Because Neo-Confucians had a conception of the mind that closely connected it to the heart (心 xin), metaphor’s empathy-inducing (...)
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  11. Introduction to the Symposium on Korean Aesthetics: The Beginning is Half.Hannah H. Kim - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 80 (3):355-356.
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  12. "What Do Zen Masters Teach Us Today?: The Case of Son Master Hyeam Songgwan".Jin Y. Park - 2022 - In Hwansoo Ilmee Kim & Jin Y. Park (eds.), New Perspectives in Modern Korean Buddhism. State University of New York. pp. 21-46.
    Chapter 1 What Do Zen Masters Teach Us Today? The Case of Sŏn Master Hyeam Sŏnggwan Jin Y. Park Introduction Korean Sŏn Master Hyeam Sŏnggwan (慧菴性觀, 1920–2001) is a relatively unknown figure within English-language scholarship.1 However, among Korean Buddhists, his rigorous Zen practice has been well recognized. One-meal-per-day (K. ilchongsik 一種食), no-meal-in-the-afternoon (K. ohu pulsik 午後不食), and staying-sitting-in-meditation-without-lying-down (K. changjwa purwa 長坐不臥) are all well-known practices that frequently appear when describing Hyeam as a Zen master. What is less frequently asked (...)
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  13. Approaches to Chan, Son, and Zen Buddhism.Albert Welber, Steven Heine & Jin Y. Park (eds.) - 2022 - Albany: State University of New York.
  14. Texts and Contexts: Women in Korean Confucianism.Hwa Yeong Wang - 2021 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 1 (36):25-27.
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  15. Confucianism and Rituals for Women in Chosŏn Korea.Hwa Yeong Wang - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):91-120.
    This essay offers an analysis of the writing and practices of Song Siyŏl as a way to explore the philosophical concepts and philosophizing process of Confucian ritual in relation to women. As a symbolic and influential figure in Korean philosophy and politics, his views contributed to shaping the orthodox interpretation of the theory and practice of Neo-Confucian ritual regarding women. By demonstrating and analyzing what kinds of issues were discussed in terms of women in four family rituals, I delineate the (...)
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  16. Contentious Source: Master Song, the Patriarch’s Voice.Hwa Yeong Wang - 2021 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 1 (36):83-116.
    This paper introduces Song Siyeol, known as Master Song (Songja 宋子), who had a great influence on Korean philosophy and politics in late Joseon (18-19th century). Among his Great Compendium, there are substantial body of writings and comments related to women. As his views directly and indirectly contributed to shaping orthodox Korean Neo- Confucian views regarding women, his writings are an invaluable resource for understanding women and gender in the late Joseon period. This paper presents his views on women, focusing (...)
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  17. Two Korean Women Confucian Philosophers: Im Yunjidang and Gang Jeongildang.Hwa Yeong Wang & Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2021 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 1 (36):29-53.
    This essay introduces two Korean women Confucian philosophers: Im Yun- jidang and Gang Jeongildang who lived in the latter period of the Joseon dynasty. Im Yunjidang was the first Confucian woman to explicitly claim women possessed an equal capacity to become sages as men. Gang Jeong- ildang made it clear that she was inspired by and sought to develop the thought of Im and added her own unique insights and new perspectives. Though they and their writings differ in many ways, (...)
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  18. Against the ban on women’s remarriage: Gendering ui 義 in Song Siyeol’s philosophy.Hwa Yeong Wang - 2020 - Asian Philosophy 30 (3):242-257.
    This article investigates the views of Song Siyeol 宋時烈 (1607–1689), a Confucian scholar-official in Joseon Korea, on marriage ritual, with a special focus on the issue of women’s remarriage. Song opposed the legal ban on women’s remarriage that was enforced in his age, despite the danger this invited of being accused of promoting licentious deeds as well as generating suspicion about his loyalty as a subject. He clearly understood women’s remarriage as an ethical and not a legal issue. The ethical (...)
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  19. Chastity as a virtue.Hwa Yeong Wang - 2020 - Religions 5 (11).
    This paper analyzes two philosophers’ views on chastity as a virtue, comparing Song Siyeol, a Korean neo-Confucian philosopher of the east, and David Hume, a Scottish philosopher. Despite the importance in and impact on women’s lives, chastity has been understated in religio-philosophical fields. The two philosophers’ understandings and arguments differ in significant ways and yet share important common aspects. Analyzing the views of Song and Hume helps us better understand and approach the issue of women’s chastity, not only as a (...)
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  20. Moving Meditation: P aik Nam June’s TV Buddha and Its Zen Buddhist Aesthetic Meaning.Tae-Seung Lim - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (1):91-107.
    The aesthetic spirit in Paik Nam June’s video art, TV Buddha, originated in the aesthetics of Zen Buddhism, and the parameters that established Paik’s aesthetic comprised the indigenous Eastern aesthetic idea of dongjing 動靜. Yi 逸 is the paramount aesthetic in Zen Buddhism, suggesting the transcendence of preexisting tracks and conventions. Paik’s behavioral music, to which he was dedicated before pioneering video art in earnest, was related to yi in terms of the complete aspects of forms, themes, and so on, (...)
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  21. Muller, A. Charles, Korea’s Great Buddhist-Confucian Debate: The Treatises of Chong Tojon and Hamho Tuktong : Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2015, 181 pages. [REVIEW]Eric S. Nelson - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (1):133-137.
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  22. Why the Sponsorship of Korean Shamanic Healing Rituals is Best Explained by the Clients’ Ostensible Reasons.Thomas G. Park - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (3):197-220.
    Various scholars have suggested that the main function of Korean shamanic rituals is the change of the participants’ feelings. I elaborate what these scholars potentially mean by “function”, challenge what I take to be their core claim, and argue that at least in the case of Korean shamanic healing rituals their sponsorship has rather to be explained based on the clients’ ostensible motivational and belief-states. Korean clients sponsor such rituals because they want their beloved ones to be healed and because (...)
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  23. Women and Buddhist Philosophy: Engaging Zen Master Kim Iryŏp.Jin Y. Park - 2017 - Honolulu, HI, USA: University of Hawaii Press.
    Why and how do women engage with Buddhism and philosophy? The present volume aims to answer these questions by examining the life and philosophy of a Korean Zen Buddhist nun, Kim Iryŏp (1896–1971). The daughter of a pastor, Iryŏp began questioning Christian doctrine as a teenager. In a few years, she became increasingly involved in women’s movements in Korea, speaking against society’s control of female sexuality and demanding sexual freedom and free divorce for women. While in her late twenties, an (...)
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  24. Traditional Korean Philosophy: Problems and Debates.Youngsun Back & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.) - 2016 - New York: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    With contributions by some of the best and most significant contemporary Korean philosophers, this important volume provides an overview of the different debates, problems, figures and periods that make up traditional Korean Buddhist and Confucian thought. The book highlights the richness and diversity of Korean philosophy as a vital and ongoing philosophical endeavour.
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  25. Les dispositions : une analyse intégrationnelle.Daihyun Chung & Nicole G. Albert - 2016 - Diogène 4:59-70.
    What sort of difficulties are faced by Humean and dispositional accounts of causality? On the one hand, Humean accounts explain the relation of causality in terms of contiguity, temporal priority, constant conjunction, and contingency, denying any notion of modality in light of the fact that there is no experiential impression of necessity involved in causation. But this is not persuasive as it does not accord with ordinary intuitions. On the other hand, many dispositionalists interpret causality, not as a relation between (...)
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  26. Kim Iryŏp. Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun. Translated with an introduction by Jin Y. Park.Halla Kim - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):170-172.
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  27. Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun by Kim Iryŏp. [REVIEW]Eric S. Nelson - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1049-1051.
    Kim Iryŏp was raised and initially educated in a devout Methodist Christian environment under the strict guidance of her fideistic pastor father and her mother, who believed in female education. Both parents died while she was in her teens, and she questioned her Christian faith at an early age. She was one of the first Korean women to pursue higher education in Korea and Japan. Kim became a prolific poet and essayist, her writings engaging cultural and social issues, and a (...)
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  28. Suffering, Evil, and the Emotions: A Joseon Debate between Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism.Eric S. Nelson - 2016 - International Journal of Korean Studies 16:447-462.
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  29. The Problem of the Sadanpujungjŏl 四端不中節 in the Four-Seven Debate.Weon-Ki Yoo - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):805-817.
    The Sadanch’iljŏng nonbyŏn 四端七情論辨, or Sach’il nonbyŏn 四七論辨, for short, primarily refers to a debate that began in the form of a correspondence between Yi Hwang and Ki Tae-sŭng in sixteenth-century Korea.1 It is generally agreed that the Four-Seven Debate “was a great theoretical achievement” and “also set an excellent example in the pursuit of philosophical discussions” in Korea.2 It was the most famous and influential debate in the history of Korean Neo-Confucianism, bringing about vigorous scholarly discussion and resulting in (...)
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  30. Dispositions: An Integrational Analysis.Daihyun Chung - 2015 - Diogenes 62 (2):32-40.
    Whereas the Humean accounts of causality in terms of contiguity, temporal priority, constant conjunction, and contingency face difficulties of one sort, the dispositional explanations of causality in terms of reciprocity, simultaneity, ubiquity, and holism seem to meet difficulties of another sort. But the difficulties which dispositionalism faces may be dissipated if one can appeal consistently to the logic of naturalism, rather than to the grammar of an implicit dualism, for example, as it is illustrated when G. Molnar tried to advance (...)
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  31. Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912 by Hwansoo Ilmee Kim.Jin Y. Park - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (2):630-632.
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  32. 茶山學入門.Ŭr-ho Yi - 2015 - Kyŏnggi-do P'aju-si: Han'guk Haksul Chŏngbo.
  33. The Significance of Toegye’s Theory on “Manifestation of Principle”.Jaeho Ahn - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):114-129.
    This article aims to critique the recent claim raised in Korea that Toegye's theory on lifa 理發 “negates the activity of li.” In my view, although the idea of lifa is not clearly presented by Zhu Xi and even contradicts his conception of “non-action of li,” it recovers fundamental Confucian principle and reaffirms valuable attributes of humanity. Toegye's notion of lifa establishes the ground for distinguishing humans from animals by emphasizing the subjective spontaneity and activity of moral rationality. To expound (...)
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  34. Finding God in the Classics: The Theistic Confucianism of Dasan Jeong Yagyong. [REVIEW]Don Baker - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):41-55.
    Dasan J eong Yagyong (1762–1836) is regarded in South Korea today as one of pre-modern Korea’s best philosophers. This article examines one of the reasons he is so respected. He modified traditional Korean Confucian moral philosophy to include notions of human nature as desires rather than innate virtue, the importance of free will rather than mere determination, and the existence of a Lord Above as a necessary incentive to proper behavior. Though he supported these changes to traditional Korean Confucian philosophy (...)
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  35. Repentance as a Bodhisattva Practice: Wŏnhyo on Guilt and Moral Responsibility.Eun-su Cho - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (1):39-54.
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  36. Integrated Korean: high advanced.Sungdai Cho, Hyo Sang Lee & Hye-Sook Wang - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  37. Integrated Korean: Beginning 1.Young-mee Cho, Hyo Sang Lee, Carol Schulz, Ho-min Sohn & Sung-ock Sohn - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  38. The 1.5 Generation: Becoming Korean American in Hawai'i.Mary Yu Danico - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  39. Soldiers on the Cultural Front: Developments in the Early History of North Korean Literature and Literary Policy.Tatiana Gabroussenko - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  40. Integrated Korean workbook: intermediate 2.Jiha Hwang & Young-Geun Lee - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  41. Ask a Korean Dude: An Authoritative and Irreverent Guide to the Korea Experience.Kim Hyung-Geun - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  42. In Search of Korean Traditional Opera: Discourses of Changguk.Andrew Killick - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  43. The unending Korean War: A social history.Dong-Choon Kim & Sung-ok Kim - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  44. Ethical Modernization: Research Misconduct and Research Ethics Reforms in Korea Following the Hwang Affair.Jongyoung Kim & Kibeom Park - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):355-380.
    The Hwang affair, a dramatic and far reaching instance of scientific fraud, shocked the world. This collective national failure prompted various organizations in Korea, including universities, regulatory agencies, and research associations, to engage in self-criticism and research ethics reforms. This paper aims, first, to document and review research misconduct perpetrated by Hwang and members of his research team, with particular attention to the agencies that failed to regulate and then supervise Hwang’s research. The paper then examines the research ethics reforms (...)
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  45. Modern Korean: an intermediate reader.Nam-Kil Kim - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  46. Korea's CEO President: Lee Myung-bak.Robert Koehler - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
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  47. Ch'oe Han-gi's Confucian Philosophy of Experience: New Names for Old Ways of Thinking.Wonsuk Chang - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):186-196.
    In this article, it is argued that Ch'oe Han-gi (1803-1877), a Korean Confucian scholar from the late Chosŏn, can be credited with finding the full philosophical significance of the notion of experience (kyŏnghŏm). At the same time, his philosophy of experience can be interpreted adequately in the context of not British empiricist but Confucian philosophical assumptions. There is both continuity and discontinuity in Ch'oe's relation to Confucian tradition. Unlike the Confucian traditionalist, he admitted that inherited knowledge and practice are potentially (...)
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  48. T'oegye wa Kobong, sot'ong hada.Se-gon Kim - 2012 - Sŏul-si: Onsaemiro.
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  49. Philosophy in Korea and Cultural Synthesis.Yersu Kim - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37 (9999):333-342.
    This an attempt to present, in analytic-descriptive terms, the complex and multi-layered legacy of the way philosophy has been done in Korea throughout history. It is panoramic and selective, largely intended for colleagues who are encountering philosophy in Korea for the first time. This presentation will be carried out in four parts. First, I examine how Korea’s geographical location on the periphery of the Asian continent has made it imperative to make use of philosophical influences coming from the continent to (...)
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  50. T'oegye p'yŏngjŏn: in'gan ŭi kil ŭl palk'yŏjun sŭsŭng.Chang-T'ae Kŭm - 2012 - Sŏul-si: Chisik kwa Kyoyang.
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1 — 50 / 353