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  1. Nicholas Unwin, Expressivism and the Metaphysics of Consciousness.
    An expressivist theory of consciousness is outlined. The suggestion that attributions of consciousness involve an essentially projective element is carefully examined, as is the view that ‘zombism’, defined as the thought that certain people are unconscious although physically normal, is a largely affective and not wholly cognitive (hypothetical) disorder. A comparison is drawn between ‘zombism’ and the Capgras delusion. The notion of supervenience is shown to be deeply problematic when applied to projected properties, as is the distinction between weak and (...)
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  2. Nicholas Unwin, Explaining Colour Phenomenology: Reduction Versus Connection.
    A major part of the mind–body problem is to explain why a given set of physical processes should give rise to qualia of one sort rather than another. Colour hues are the usual example considered here, and there is a lively debate between, for example, Hardin, Levine, Jackson, Clark and Chalmers as to whether the results of colour vision science can provide convincing explanations of why colours actually look the way they do. This paper examines carefully the type of explanation (...)
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  3. Nicholas Unwin, Truthmakers, Deflationism and Weak Correspondence.
    A line of argument, presented by David Lewis, to show that the correspondence theory of truth is not a real alternative to deflationism is developed. It is shown that truthmakers, construed as concrete events or states of affairs, are unsatisfactory entities, since we do not know how to individuate them or how to identify their essential qualities. Furthermore, the real work is usually done by supervenience relations, which have little to do with truth. It is argued that the Equivalence Schema (...)
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  4. Nicholas Unwin (2013). Deflationist Truth is Substantial. Acta Analytica 28 (3):257-266.
    Deflationism is usually thought to differ from the correspondence theory over whether truth is a substantial property. However, I argue that this notion of a ‘substantial property’ is tendentious. I further argue that the Equivalence Schema alone is sufficient to lead to idealism when combined with a pragmatist theory of truth. Deflationism thus has more powerful metaphysical implications than is generally thought and itself amounts to a kind of correspondence theory.
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  5. Nicholas Unwin, The Language of Colour:Neurology and the Ineffable.
    It is often claimed, following Joseph Levine, that there is an ‘explanatory gap’ between ordinary physical facts and the way we perceive things, so that it is impossible to explain, among other things, why colours actually look the way they do. C.L. Hardin, by contrast, argues that there are sufficient asymmetries between colours to traverse this gap. This paper argues that the terms we use to characterize colours, such as ‘warm’ and ‘cool’, are not well understood, and that we need (...)
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  6. Nicholas Unwin (2012). The Nature and Structure of Content. By Jeffrey C. King. (Oxford UP, 2007. Pp. X + 230. Price £37.50 Hardback. £17.99 Paperback). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):876-878.
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  7. Nicholas Unwin (2011). Why Do Colours Look the Way They Do? Philosophy 86 (03):405-424.
    Some links between colour phenomenology and its physiological basis are examined in detail, in particular concerning a kind of hue-inversion where blue is exchanged with green and yellow with pink. A project to develop an appropriate phenomenal language is outlined. The impact of such links on the �explanatory gap� and the �knowledge argument� is considered in the context of the debate between Hardin and Levine. I agree with Hardin that the �gap� is highly exaggerated, but conclude instead that it is (...)
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  8. Nicholas Unwin (2008). Divine Hoorays: Some Parallels Between Expressivism and Religious Ethics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):659-684.
    Divine law theories of metaethics claim that moral rightness is grounded in God’s commands, wishes and so forth. Expressivist theories, by contrast, claim that to call something morally right is to express our own attitudes, not to report on God’s. Ostensibly, such views are incompatible. However, we shall argue that a rapprochement is possible and beneficial to both sides. Expressivists need to explain the difference between reporting and expressing an attitude, and to address the Frege-Geach problem. Divine law theorists need (...)
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  9. Nicholas Unwin (2007). Ernest Sosa and His Critics - Edited by John Greco. Philosophical Books 48 (2):170-172.
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  10. Nicholas Unwin (2007). Aiming at Truth. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The author argues that is not obvious what it means for our beliefs and assertions to be "truth-directed", and that we need to weaken our ordinary notion of a belief if we are to deal with radical scepticism without surrendering to idealism. Topics examined also include whether there could be alien conceptual schemes and what might happen to us if we abandoned genuine belief in place of mere pragmatic acceptance. A radically new "ecological" model of knowledge is defended.
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  11. Alan Millar & Nicholas Unwin (2005). Epistemology. Philosophical Books 46 (2):167-170.
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  12. Nicholas Unwin (2005). Before Logic by Richard Mason. Albany NY: State University of New York Press. 2000. Pp. 153. $23.50, $22.95. Philosophy 80 (2):289-291.
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  13. Nicholas Unwin (2005). Review: Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophy 80 (312):289 - 291.
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  14. Nicholas Unwin (2003). What Does It Mean to Aim at Truth? American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):91 - 104.
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  15. Nicholas Unwin (2001). Norms and Negation: A Problem for Gibbard's Logic. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):60-75.
    A difficulty is exposed in Allan Gibbard's solution to the embedding/Frege-Geach problem, namely that the difference between refusing to accept a normative judgement and accepting its negation is ignored. This is shown to undermine the whole solution.
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  16. Nicholas Unwin (1999). Quasi-Realism, Negation and the Frege-Geach Problem. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (196):337-352.
    Expressivists, such as Blackburn, analyse sentences such as 'S thinks that it ought to be the case that p' as S hoorays that p'. A problem is that the former sentence can be negated in three different ways, but the latter in only two. The distinction between refusing to accept a moral judgement and accepting its negation therefore cannot be accounted for. This is shown to undermine Blackburn's solution to the Frege-Geach problem.
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  17. Nicholas Unwin, Cultures and Total Frameworks.
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  18. Nicholas Unwin (1996). Locke on Language and Real Essences: A Defense. History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):205 - 219.
  19. Nicholas Unwin (1996). The Individuation of Events. Mind 105 (418):315-330.
    It is argued that current solutions to the question of how to individuate events do not work. Jonathan Bennett's thesis that the indeterminacy here is only semantic, not ontological, is refuted. An alternative account of why events resemble facts (although their identity criteria are less fine-grained) is defended.
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  20. Nicholas Unwin (1990). Can Emotivism Sustain a Social Ethics? Ratio 3 (1):64-81.
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  21. Nicholas Unwin (1989). The Faces of Existence: An Essay in Nonreductive Metaphysics. Philosophical Books 30 (3):162-164.
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  22. Nicholas Unwin (1987). Beyond Truth: Towards a New Conception of Knowledge and Communication. Mind 96 (383):299-317.
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  23. Nicholas Unwin (1987). Recent Philosophers: A Supplement to A Hundred Years of Philosophy. Philosophical Books 28 (2):87-88.
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  24. Nicholas Unwin (1985). Relativism and Moral Complacency. Philosophy 60 (232):205-214.
    Moral relativism is the doctrine that morality may vary from culture to culture. Given the difficulty of saying when two individuals belong to the same culture it can be taken in more or less radical forms. In its least radical form it means nothing more than that, although morality is fixed and universal for human beings, Martian morality may be different. In its most radical form it implies that each person has his own morality which may vary from one individual (...)
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  25. Nicholas Unwin (1985). Morality, Law, and the Evaluation of Values. Mind 94 (376):538-549.
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  26. Nicholas Unwin, Substance, Essence, and Conceptualism.
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  27. Nicholas Unwin (1982). Identity and Essence. Philosophical Books 23 (1):49-50.
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  28. Nicholas Unwin (1982). Things That Happen. Philosophical Books 23 (2):106-107.
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  29. Nicholas Unwin & Harold W. Noonan (1981). Objects and Identity. Philosophical Quarterly 31 (125):367.
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