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Profile: Zachary Hoskins (University of Nottingham)
  1. Zachary Hoskins (2014). Ex-Offender Restrictions. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):33-48.
    Individuals convicted of crimes are often subject to numerous restrictions — on housing, employment, the vote, public assistance, and other goods — well after they have completed their sentences, and in some cases permanently. The question of whether — and if so, when — ex-offender restrictions are morally permissible has received surprisingly little philosophical scrutiny. This article first examines the significance of completing punishment, of paying one's debt to society, and contends that when offenders' debts are paid, they should be (...)
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  2. Zachary Hoskins (2014). ''Punishing States and the Spectre of Guilt by Association''. International Criminal Law Review 14 (4-5):901-919.
    Proponents of punishing states often claim that such punishment would not distribute to members of the state, and so it would not subject innocent citizens – those who did not participate in the crimes, or dissented, or even were among the victims – to guilt by association. This essay examines three features of state punishment that might be said not to distribute to citizens: it is burdensome, it is intentionally so, and it expresses social condemnation. Ultimately, I contend that when (...)
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  3. Zachary Hoskins (2014). Review: Recidivist Punishments: The Philosopher's View - Claudio Tamburrini and Jesper Ryberg (Eds.). [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):531-534.
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  4. Zachary Hoskins (2014). The Moral Permissibility of Punishment. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Moral Permissibility of Punishment The legal institution of punishment presents a distinctive moral challenge because it involves a state’s infliction of intentionally harsh, or burdensome, treatment on some of its members—treatment that typically would be considered morally impermissible. Most of us would agree, for instance, that it is typically impermissible to imprison people, to […].
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  5. Zachary Hoskins (2013). ''Obligation''. In James E. Crimmins (ed.), The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Utilitarianism. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  6. Zachary Hoskins (2013). ''Punishment, Contempt, and the Prospect of Moral Reform''. Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (1):1-18.
    This paper objects to certain forms of punishments, such as supermax confinement, on grounds that they are inappropriately contemptuous. Building on discussions in Kant and elsewhere, I flesh out what I take to be salient features of contempt, features that make contempt especially troubling as a form of moral regard and treatment. As problematic as contempt may be in the interpersonal context, I contend that it is especially troubling when a person is treated contemptuously by her political community’s institutions -- (...)
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  7. Zachary Hoskins (2013). Review: Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide - Lara Denis (Ed.). [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (3):361-64.
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  8. Zachary Hoskins & Nora Wikoff (2013). ''Hard Times After Hard Time''. In Joanna Crosby David Bzdak & Seth Vannatta (eds.), The Wire and Philosophy. Open Court Books.
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  9. Zachary Hoskins (2011). ''Correlative Obligations''. In Dean K. Chatterjee (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Justice. Springer.
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  10. Zachary Hoskins (2011). ''Deterrent Punishment and Respect for Persons''. Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law 8 (2):369-384.
    This article defends deterrence as an aim of punishment. Specifically, I contend that a system of punishment aimed at deterrence (with constraints to prohibit punishing the innocent or excessively punishing the guilty) is consistent with the liberal principle of respect for offenders as autonomous moral persons. I consider three versions of the objection that deterrent punishment fails to respect offenders. The first version, raised by Jeffrie Murphy and others, charges that deterrent punishment uses offenders as mere means to securing the (...)
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  11. Zachary Hoskins (2011). ''Fair Play, Political Obligation, and Punishment''. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):53-71.
    This paper attempts to establish that, and explain why, the practice of punishing offenders is in principle morally permissible. My account is a nonstandard version of the fair play view, according to which punishment's permissibility derives from reciprocal obligations shared by members of a political community, understood as a mutually beneficial, cooperative venture. Most fair play views portray punishment as an appropriate means of removing the unfair advantage an offender gains relative to law-abiding members of the community. Such views struggle, (...)
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  12. Zachary Hoskins (2011). ''Non-Combatant Immunity''. In Dean K. Chatterjee (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Justice. Springer.
  13. Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) (2010). International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy is the first anthology to bring together legal and philosophical theorists to examine the normative and conceptual foundations of international criminal law. In particular, through these essays the international group of authors addresses questions of state sovereignty; of groups, rather than individuals, as perpetrators and victims of international crimes; of international criminal law and the promotion of human rights and social justice; and of what comes after international criminal prosecutions, namely, punishment and reconciliation. International criminal (...)
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  14. Zachary Hoskins (2009). ''On Highest Authority: Do Religious Reasons Have a Place in Public Policy Debates?''. Social Theory and Practice 35 (3):393-412.
    This paper examines whether religious reasons have a legitimate place in a liberal democracy's policy debates. Robert Audi, building from Rawlsian themes, contends that civic virtue obliges religious citizens who advocate for public policies to have sufficiently motivating secular reasons. Others contend it's unfair to exclude reasonable citizens from policy debates merely because their only reasons are religious ones. This essay seeks to reconcile the intuitions behind these competing views. I examine Audi's account of the differences between religious and secular (...)
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  15. Zachary Hoskins (2008). Review: The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory - by Richard Dean. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 49 (2):150-152.
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