This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
16 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Jami L. Anderson (1998). Understanding Punishment as Annulment. Social Philosophy Today 13:215-226.
    Hegel claims that punishment is justified because it annuls crimes thereby revealing the criminal act for what it is, a will “null and void.” In this paper I analyze the complex notion of annulment, arguing that Hegel is claiming that punishment does not change the past, but alters the status of the criminal will so as to reveal that will for what it is, a violation of a victim’s rights. In short, punishment invalidates the criminal's will and validates the victim's (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. William Bülow (2014). The Harms Beyond Imprisonment: Do We Have Special Moral Obligations Towards the Families and Children of Prisoners? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):775-789.
    This paper discusses whether the collateral harm of imprisonment to the close family members and children of prison inmates may give rise to special moral obligations towards them. Several collateral harms, including decreased psychological wellbeing, financial costs, loss of economic opportunities, and intrusion and control over their private lives, are identified. Two competing perspectives in moral philosophy are then applied in order to assess whether the harms are permissible. The first is consequentialist and the second is deontological. It is argued (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bernice Elger & David Shaw (forthcoming). Preventing Human Rights Violations in Prison – the Role of Guidelines. In Bernice Elger, Catherine Ritter & Heino Stöver (eds.), Emerging Issues in Prison Health. Springer.
    It is well known that prisoners’ human rights are often violated. In this chapter we examine whether guidelines can be effective in preventing such violations and in helping physicians resolve the significant conflicts of interest that they often face in trying to protect prisoners’ rights. We begin by explaining the role of clinical and ethical guidelines outside prisons, in the context of healthcare for non-incarcerated prisoners, and then the specific role of such guidelines within prisons, where the main concerns are (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kirsten J. Fisher (2009). The Distinct Character of International Crime: Theorizing the Domain. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (1):44-67.
  5. Joseph S. Fulda (2011). Sting Operations Revisited More Generally: Seeing the Forest and the Trees. Sexuality and Culture 15 (4):395-398.
    Review article referring to my prior work in many contexts with the upshot that: Subject to an /extremely/ limited set of exceptions, /all/ sting operations are /per se/ gravely and deeply immoral for the simplest and plainest of reasons: They are calculated and deliberate attempts to bring out the worst in a fellow human being, to play to their weaknesses, and to pander to their blind spots. Whether performed by the government, the media, or other private organizations (for-profit or not-for-profit), (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Joseph S. Fulda (2007). Internet Stings Directed at Pedophiles: A Study in Philosophy and Law. Sexuality and Culture 11 (1):52-98.
    The article is intended to, in Sections I and II, flesh out and put within a metaphilosophical framework the theoretical argument first made in 2002 in “Do Internet Stings Directed at Pedophiles Capture Offenders or Create Offenders? And Allied Questions” (Sexuality & Culture 6(4): 73–100), with some modifications (See note 14). Where there are differences, I stand by this version as the final version of the argument. Section III addresses three experimental or empirical studies which might be thought to contradict (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Clive Harfield (2012). Police Informers and Professional Ethics. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (2):73-95.
    Abstract The use of informers is morally problematic for police institutions, for investigation managers, and for those individuals either who act as informers or who have daily responsibility for handling informers. This paper examines the moral issues concerning informers at each of these levels. Recourse to informers can be accommodated within Miller and Blackler's moral theory of policing. Within this context, criteria for the morally justifiable deployment of informers are proposed and supplemented with further proposed criteria for morally justifiable informer (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Chief Justice Heffernan (forthcoming). A Few Opinions on Sentencing Enhancement for Hate Crimes. Criminal Justice Ethics.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Zachary Hoskins (2014). Ex-Offender Restrictions. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):33-48.
    Individuals convicted of crimes are often subject to numerous restrictions — on housing, employment, the vote, public assistance, and other goods — well after they have completed their sentences, and in some cases permanently. The question of whether — and if so, when — ex-offender restrictions are morally permissible has received surprisingly little philosophical scrutiny. This article first examines the significance of completing punishment, of paying one's debt to society, and contends that when offenders' debts are paid, they should be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Christine James (2012). Prisons for Profit in the United States: Retribution and Means Vs. Ends. Journal for Human Rights 6 (1):76-93.
    The recent trend toward privately owned and operated prisons calls attention to a variety of issues involving human rights. The growing number of corporatized correctional institutions is especially notable in the United States, but it is also a global phenomenon in many countries. The reasons cited for privatizing prisons are usually economic; the opportunity to outsource prison services enables local political leaders to save tax revenue, and local communities are promised a chance to create new jobs and bring in a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Annabelle Lever (2013). Democracy and Security. The Philosophers' Magazine 63 (4):99-110.
    It is especially hard, at present, to read the newspapers without emitting a howl of anguish and outrage. Philosophy can heal some wounds but, in this case, political action may prove a better remedy than philosophy. It can therefore feel odd trying to think philosophically about surveillance at a time like this, rather than joining with like-minded people to protest the erosion of our civil liberties, the duplicity of our governments, and the failings in our political institutions - including our (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). An Ubuntu-Based Evaluation of the State’s Responses to Marikana: Where’s the Reconciliation? Social Dynamics 40 (3).
    In this article, I consider the ethical status of the South African government’s responses to the Marikana tragedy, in which police shot and killed more than 30 striking miners, in light of a moral principle grounded on values associated with ubuntu. I argue that there are several respects in which the government’s reactions have been unethical from an ubuntu-oriented perspective, and also make positive suggestions about what it instead should have been doing. Much of what I recommend amounts to contending (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Linda Radzik (2003). Do Wrongdoers Have a Right to Make Amends? Social Theory and Practice 29 (2):325-41.
    Do people deserve a chance to right the wrongs they have committed? Would denying an offender the opportunity to make amends amount to an injustice? There are compelling reasons to grant such a right. However, there are also significant objections. First, a right to make amends potentially undermines the state's right to punish criminal wrongdoers. Secondly, the alleged right threatens to put undue pressure on victims to forgive their abusers. In this essay I argue that these objections can be met (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. D. Sank & D. Caplan (eds.) (1991). To Be a Victim. Plenum.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David Shaw, Karyn McCluskey, Will Linden & Christine Goodall (2012). Reducing the Harmful Effects of Alcohol Misuse: The Ethics of Sobriety Testing in Criminal Justice. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):669-671.
    Alcohol use and abuse play a major role in both crime and negative health outcomes in Scotland. This paper provides a description and ethical and legal analysis of a novel remote alcohol monitoring scheme for offenders which seeks to reduce alcohol-related harm to both the criminal and the public. It emerges that the prospective benefits of this scheme to health and public order vastly outweigh any potential harms.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Roger Wertheimer (1991). Preferring Punishment of Criminals Over Provisions for Victims. In D. Sank & D. Caplan (eds.), To Be a Victim. Plenum.
    Victims of crime have long been victimized by our criminal justice system. Why? And why has the movement to rectify this been so late coming?
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation