Search results for 'many worlds quantum Everett multiverse' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Amit Hagar (2010). Review of Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent, David Wallace (Eds.), Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).score: 1180.8
    Hugh Everett III died of a heart attack in July 1982 at the age of 51. Almost 26 years later, a New York Times obituary for his PhD advisor, John Wheeler, mentioned him and Richard Feynman as Wheeler’s most prominent students. Everett’s PhD thesis on the relative state formulation of quantum mechanics, later known as the “Many Worlds Interpretation”, was published (in its edited form) in 1957, and later (in its original, unedited form) in 1973, (...)
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  2. Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.) (2012). Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.score: 1092.0
    What follows when quantum theory is applied to the whole universe? This is one of the greatest puzzles of modern science. Philosophers and physicists here debate the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics, according to which this universe is one of countlessly many others, constantly branching in time, all of which are real.
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  3. Peter Lewis (2012). Simon Saunders , Jonathan Barrett , Adrian Kent , and David Wallace , Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality . Oxford: Oxford University Press (2010), 618 Pp., $99.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 79 (1):177-181.score: 984.0
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  4. Howard Stein (1984). The Everett Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: Many Worlds or None? Noûs 18 (4):635-652.score: 984.0
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  5. Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.) (2010). Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. Oxford University Press.score: 984.0
    These are the questions which an illustrious team of philosophers and physicists debate in this volume.
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  6. Jeremy Butterfield (2011). Reviews Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory and Reality. Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent and David Wallace. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Pp. Xvi + 618. ISBN: 9780199560561; £55 Hbk. [REVIEW] Philosophy 86 (3):451-463.score: 984.0
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  7. Jeffrey Barrett (2011). Everett's Pure Wave Mechanics and the Notion of Worlds. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (2):277-302.score: 830.4
    Everett (1957a, b, 1973) relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics has often been taken to involve a metaphysical commitment to the existence of many splitting worlds each containing physical copies of observers and the objects they observe. While there was earlier talk of splitting worlds in connection with Everett, this is largely due to DeWitt’s (Phys Today 23:30–35, 1970) popular presentation of the theory. While the thought of splitting worlds or parallel universes has captured (...)
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  8. Clare Hewitt-Horsman (2009). An Introduction to Many Worlds in Quantum Computation. Foundations of Physics 39 (8):869-902.score: 772.8
    The interpretation of quantum mechanics is an area of increasing interest to many working physicists. In particular, interest has come from those involved in quantum computing and information theory, as there has always been a strong foundational element in this field. This paper introduces one interpretation of quantum mechanics, a modern ‘many-worlds’ theory, from the perspective of quantum computation. Reasons for seeking to interpret quantum mechanics are discussed, then the specific ‘neo-Everettian’ theory (...)
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  9. V. Allori, S. Goldstein, R. Tumulka & N. Zanghi (2011). Many Worlds and Schrodinger's First Quantum Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):1-27.score: 760.8
    Schrödinger’s first proposal for the interpretation of quantum mechanics was based on a postulate relating the wave function on configuration space to charge density in physical space. Schrödinger apparently later thought that his proposal was empirically wrong. We argue here that this is not the case, at least for a very similar proposal with charge density replaced by mass density. We argue that when analyzed carefully, this theory is seen to be an empirically adequate many-worlds theory and (...)
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  10. Howard Barnum, The Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: Psychological Versus Physical Bases for the Multiplicity of "Worlds".score: 760.8
    This unpublished 1990 preprint argues that a crucial distinction in discussions of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics (MWI) is that between versions of the interpretation positing a physical multiplicity of worlds, and those in which the multiplicity is merely psychological, and due to the splitting of consciousness upon interaction with amplified quantum superpositions. It is argued that Everett's original version of the MWI belongs to the latter class, and that most of the criticisms (...)
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  11. Michael E. Cuffaro (2012). Many Worlds, the Cluster-State Quantum Computer, and the Problem of the Preferred Basis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 43 (1):35-42.score: 676.8
    I argue that the many worlds explanation of quantum computation is not licensed by, and in fact is conceptually inferior to, the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics from which it is derived. I argue that the many worlds explanation of quantum computation is incompatible with the recently developed cluster state model of quantum computation. Based on these considerations I conclude that we should reject the many worlds explanation (...)
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  12. Robin Hanson (2003). When Worlds Collide: Quantum Probability From Observer Selection? [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 33 (7):1129-1150.score: 662.4
    In Everett's many worlds interpretation, quantum measurements are considered to be decoherence events. If so, then inexact decoherence may allow large worlds to mangle the memory of observers in small worlds, creating a cutoff in observable world size. Smaller world are mangled and so not observed. If this cutoff is much closer to the median measure size than to the median world size, the distribution of outcomes seen in unmangled worlds follows the Born (...)
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  13. Berry Groisman, Na'ama Hallakoun & Lev Vaidman (2013). The Measure of Existence of a Quantum World and the Sleeping Beauty Problem. Analysis 73 (4):695-706.score: 626.4
    Next SectionAn attempt to resolve the controversy regarding the solution of the Sleeping Beauty Problem in the framework of the Many-Worlds Interpretation led to a new controversy regarding the Quantum Sleeping Beauty Problem. We apply the concept of a measure of existence of a world and reach the solution known as ‘thirder’ solution which differs from Peter Lewis’s ‘halfer’ assertion. We argue that this method provides a simple and powerful tool for analysing rational decision theory problems.
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  14. M. J. Rave (2011). Quantum Interference and Many Worlds: A New Family of Classical Analogies. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (8):1318-1330.score: 525.6
    We present a new way of constructing classical analogies of quantum interference. These analogies share one common factor: they treat closed loops as fundamental entities. Such analogies can be used to understand the difference between quantum and classical probability; they can also be used to illuminate the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. An examination of these analogies suggests that closed loops (particularly closed loops in time) may have special significance in interpretations of quantum (...)
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  15. Meir Hemmo (2007). Quantum Probability and Many Worlds. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (2):333-350.score: 507.6
    We discuss the meaning of probabilities in the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. We start by presenting very briefly the many worlds theory, how the problem of probability arises, and some unsuccessful attempts to solve it in the past. Then we criticize a recent attempt by Deutsch to derive the quantum mechanical probabilities from the nonprobabilistic parts of quantum mechanics and classical decision theory. We further argue that the Born probability does not (...)
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  16. Jacques Mallah, Many-Worlds Interpretations Can Not Imply 'Quantum Immortality'.score: 507.6
    The fallacy that the many worlds interpretation (MWI) of quantum mechanics implies certain survival in quantum-Russian-roulette-like situations (the ‘Quantum Suicide’ (QS) thought experiment) has become common enough that it is now necessary to publicly debunk this belief despite the risk of further publicizing it. ‘Quantum Immortality’ (QI) is an extension of the QS Fallacy (QSF) with some additional unlikely assumptions. The QS/QI ideas are examined here and shown to be false.
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  17. Lev Vaidman, Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 507.6
    The Many-Worlds Interpretation (MWI) is an approach to quantum mechanics according to which, in addition to the world we are aware of directly, there are many other similar worlds which exist in parallel at the same space and time. The existence of the other worlds makes it possible to remove randomness and action at a distance from quantum theory and thus from all physics.
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  18. Armond Duwell (2007). The Many-Worlds Interpretation and Quantum Computation. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):1007-1018.score: 507.6
    David Deutsch and others have suggested that the Many-Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics is the only interpretation capable of explaining the special efficiency quantum computers seem to enjoy over classical ones. I argue that this view is not tenable. Using a toy algorithm I show that the Many-Worlds Interpretation must crucially use the ontological status of the universal state vector to explain quantum computational efficiency, as opposed to the particular ontology of the MWI, (...)
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  19. Lev Vaidman (1998). On Schizophrenic Experiences of the Neutron or Why We Should Believe in the Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Theory. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (3):245 – 261.score: 507.6
    This is a philosophical paper in favor of the many-worlds interpretation (MWI) of quantum theory. The necessity of introducing many worlds is explained by analyzing a neutron interference experiment. The concept of the “measure of existence of a world” is introduced and some difficulties with the issue of probability in the framework of the MWI are resolved.
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  20. John Leslie (1996). A Difficulty for Everett's Many-Worlds Theory. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 10 (3):239 – 246.score: 507.6
    Abstract An argument originated by Brandon Carter presents humankind's imminent extinction as likelier than we should otherwise have judged. We ought to be reluctant to think ourselves among the earliest 0.01 %, for instance, of all humans who will ever have lived; yet we should be in that tiny group if the human race survived long, even at just its present size. While such reasoning attracts many criticisms, perhaps the only grave one is that indeterminism means there is not (...)
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  21. R. Plaga (1997). On a Possibility to Find Experimental Evidence for the Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 27 (4):559-577.score: 507.6
    The many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics predicts the formation of distinct parallel worlds as a result, of a quantum mechanical measurement. Communication among these parallel worlds would experimentally rule out alternatives to this interpretation. A possible procedure for “interworld” exchange of information and energy, using only state of the art quantum optical equipement, is described. A single ion is isolated from its environment in an ion trap. Then a quantum mechanical measurement with (...)
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  22. Alastair Wilson (2012). Everettian Quantum Mechanics Without Branching Time. Synthese 188 (1):67-84.score: 501.6
    In this paper I assess the prospects for combining contemporary Everettian quantum mechanics (EQM) with branching-time semantics in the tradition of Kripke, Prior, Thomason and Belnap. I begin by outlining the salient features of ‘decoherence-based’ EQM, and of the ‘consistent histories’ formalism that is particularly apt for conceptual discussions in EQM. This formalism permits of both ‘branching worlds’ and ‘parallel worlds’ interpretations; the metaphysics of EQM is in this sense underdetermined by the physics. A prominent argument due (...)
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  23. Daniel Peterson (2011). Qeauty and the Books: A Response to Lewis's Quantum Sleeping Beauty Problem. Synthese 181 (3):367-374.score: 501.6
    In his 2007 paper “Quantum Sleeping Beauty”, Peter Lewis poses a problem for the supporters’ of the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics appeal to subjective probability. Lewis’s argument hinges on parallels between the traditional “sleeping beauty” problem in epistemology and a quantum variant. These two cases, Lewis argues, advocate different treatments of credences even though they share important epistemic similarities, leading to a tension between the traditional solution to the sleeping beauty problem (typically called the “thirder” (...)
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  24. Robin Hanson, Drift–Diffusion in Mangled Worlds Quantum Mechanics.score: 460.8
    In Everett’s many-worlds interpretation, where quantum measurements are seen as decoherence events, inexact decoherence may let large worlds mangle the memories of observers in small worlds, creating a cutoff in observable world measure. I solve a growth–drift–diffusion–absorption model of such a mangled worlds scenario, and show that it reproduces the Born probability rule closely, though not exactly. Thus, inexact decoherence may allow the Born rule to be derived in a many-worlds approach (...)
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  25. Lev Vaidman (2010). Time Symmetry and the Many-Worlds Interpretation. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.score: 460.8
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  26. Rudiger Schack (2010). The Principal Principle and Probability in the Many-Worlds Interpretation. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.score: 460.8
     
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  27. Max Tegmark (2010). Many Worlds in Context. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.score: 460.8
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  28. Antony Valentini (2010). Pilot-Wave Theory: Many Worlds in Denial? In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oup Oxford.score: 460.8
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  29. Euan J. Squires (1991). One Mind or Many? A Note on the Everett Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Synthese 89 (November):283-6.score: 459.0
    The Everett interpretation of quantum theory requires either the existence of an infinite number of conscious minds associated with each brain or the existence of one universal consciousness. Reasons are given, and the two ideas are compared.
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  30. Milan M. Ćirković (2005). Physics Versus Semantics: A Puzzling Case of the Missing Quantum Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 35 (5):817-838.score: 453.0
    A case for the project of excising of confusion and obfuscation in the contemporary quantum theory initiated and promoted by David Deutsch has been made. It has been argued that at least some theoretical entities which are conventionally labelled as “interpretations” of quantum mechanics are in fact full-blooded physical theories in their own right, and as such are falsifiable, at least in principle. The most pertinent case is the one of the so-called “Many-Worlds Interpretation” (MWI) of (...)
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  31. Jeffrey Barrett, Everett's Relative-State Formulation of Quantum Mechanics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 436.8
    Everett's relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics is an attempt to solve the measurement problem by dropping the collapse dynamics from the standard von Neumann-Dirac theory of quantum mechanics. The main problem with Everett's theory is that it is not at all clear how it is supposed to work. In particular, while it is clear that he wanted to explain why we get determinate measurement results in the context of his theory, it is unclear how he intended (...)
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  32. David Wallace (2002). Worlds in the Everett Interpretation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (4):637-661.score: 436.8
    This is a discussion of how we can understand the world-view given to us by the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics, and in particular the role played by the concept of 'world'. The view presented is that we are entitled to use 'many-worlds' terminology even if the theory does not specify the worlds in the formalism; this is defended by means of an extensive analogy with the concept of an 'instant' or moment of time in (...)
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  33. Jacques Mallah, The Many Computations Interpretation (MCI) of Quantum Mechanics.score: 436.8
    Computationalism provides a framework for understanding how a mathematically describable physical world could give rise to conscious observations without the need for dualism. A criterion is proposed for the implementation of computations by physical systems, which has been a problem for computationalism. Together with an independence criterion for implementations this would allow, in principle, prediction of probabilities for various observations based on counting implementations. Applied to quantum mechanics, this results in a Many Computations Interpretation (MCI), which is an (...)
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  34. I. San Pedro (2012). Many Worlds: Quantum Theory and Reality? Analysis 72 (2):386-395.score: 432.0
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  35. Iñaki San Pedro (2012). Many Worlds: Quantum Theory and Reality? Analysis 72 (2):386 - 395.score: 432.0
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  36. Frank J. Tipler (1986). The Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics in Quantum Cosmology. In. In Roger Penrose & C. J. Isham (eds.), Quantum Concepts in Space and Time. New York ;Oxford University Press. 1--204.score: 432.0
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  37. Brett Maynard Bevers (2011). Everett's “Many-Worlds” Proposal. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (1):3-12.score: 423.0
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  38. Marek Szydłowski (1982). Wieloświatowa interpretacja mechaniki kwantowej [recenzja] The Many - Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, ed.: Bryce S. De Vitt, Neill Graham, 1973. [REVIEW] Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 4.score: 423.0
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  39. Benjamin Murphy (2013). The Many Worlds of Hugh Everett III: Multiple Universes, Mutually Assured Destruction and the Meltdown of a Nuclear Family. By Peter Byrne. Pp. Xiii, 436, New York, Oxford University Press, 2010, $45/£26.50. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (4):714-714.score: 423.0
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  40. Christian de Ronde, Hector Freytes & Graciela Domenech (2014). Interpreting the Modal Kochen–Specker Theorem: Possibility and Many Worlds in Quantum Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 45:11-18.score: 423.0
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  41. Guido Bacciagaluppi (2013). The Many Facets of Everett's Many Worlds. Metascience 22 (3):575-582.score: 423.0
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  42. Lev Vaidman (2012). Probability in the Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. In. In Yemima Ben-Menahem & Meir Hemmo (eds.), Probability in Physics. Springer. 299--311.score: 423.0
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  43. David Papineau & Víctor Durà-Vilà (2009). Reply to Lewis: Metaphysics Versus Epistemology. Analysis 69 (1):89-91.score: 405.6
    Peter J. Lewis argued that the Everettian interpretation of quantum mechanics implies the unpopular halfer position in the Sleeping Beauty debate. We retorted that it is perfectly coherent to be an Everettian and an ordinary thirder. In a recent reply to our paper Lewis further clarifies the basis for his thinking. We think this brings out nicely where he goes wrong: he underestimates the importance of metaphysical considerations in determining rational credences.
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  44. Tim Maudlin (2014). Critical Study David Wallace, The Emergent Multiverse: Quantum Theory According to the Everett Interpretation. Oxford University Press, 2012, 530 + Xv Pp. [REVIEW] Noûs 48 (3).score: 405.0
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  45. Lev Vaidman (forthcoming). David Wallace the Emergent Multiverse: Quantum Theory According to the Everett Interpretation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axu009.score: 405.0
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  46. Thomas Ryckman (2012). What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Physics? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):496-512.score: 397.6
    Abstract Naturalized metaphysics remains a default presupposition of much contemporary philosophy of physics. As metaphysics is supposed to be about the general structure of reality, so a naturalized metaphysics draws upon our best physical theories: Assuming the truth of such a theory, it attempts to answer the “foundational question par excellence “, “how could the world possibly be the way this theory says it is?“ It is argued that attention to historical detail in the development and formulation of physical theories (...)
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  47. David Wallace (2010). A Formal Proof of the Born Rule From Decision-Theoretic Assumptions [Aka: How to Prove the Born Rule]. In Simon Saunders, Jon Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. OUP.score: 393.6
    I develop the decision-theoretic approach to quantum probability, originally proposed by David Deutsch, into a mathematically rigorous proof of the Born rule in (Everett-interpreted) quantum mechanics. I sketch the argument informally, then prove it formally, and lastly consider a number of proposed ``counter-examples'' to show exactly which premises of the argument they violate. (This is a preliminary version of a chapter to appear --- under the title ``How to prove the Born Rule'' --- in Saunders, Barrett, Kent (...)
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  48. Alan Forrester (2007). Decision Theory and Information Propagation in Quantum Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (4):815-831.score: 362.4
    In recent papers, Zurek [(2005). Probabilities from entanglement, Born's rule pk=|ψk|2 from entanglement. Physical Review A, 71, 052105] has objected to the decision-theoretic approach of Deutsch [(1999) Quantum theory of probability and decisions. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A, 455, 3129–3137] and Wallace [(2003). Everettian rationality: defending Deutsch's approach to probability in the Everett interpretation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics, 34, 415–438] to deriving the Born rule for quantum probabilities on the grounds (...)
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  49. Cynthia Sue Larson (2014). Evidence of Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena and Conscious Reality Selection. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):34-47.score: 355.2
    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of emergent examples of macroscopic quantum phenomena. While quantum theory asserts that such quantum behaviors as superposition, entanglement, and coherence are possible for all objects, assumptions that quantum processes operate exclusively within the quantum realm have contributed to on-going bias toward presumed primacy of classical physics in the macroscopic realm. Non-trivial quantum macroscopic effects are now recognized in the fields of biology, quantum physics, (...)
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  50. Louis Marchildon (2011). Can Everett Be Interpreted Without Extravaganza? Foundations of Physics 41 (3):357-362.score: 352.8
    Everett’s relative states interpretation of quantum mechanics has met with problems related to probability, the preferred basis, and multiplicity. The third theme, I argue, is the most important one. It has led to developments of the original approach into many-worlds, many-minds, and decoherence-based approaches. The latter especially have been advocated in recent years, in an effort to understand multiplicity without resorting to what is often perceived as extravagant constructions. Drawing from and adding to arguments of (...)
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