Bookmark and Share

Quantum Mechanics

Edited by Michael Cuffaro (Ludwig Maximilians Universität, München)
Assistant editors: Radin Dardashti, Brian Padden
About this topic
Summary Issues in the philosophy of quantum mechanics include first and foremost, its interpretation. Probably the most well-known of these is the 'orthodox' Copenhagen interpretation associated with Neils Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Wolfgang Pauli, John von Neumann, and others. Beginning roughly at the midway point of the previous century, philosophers' attention began to be drawn towards alternative interpretations of the theory, including Bohmian mechanics, the relative state formulation of quantum mechanics and its variants (i.e., DeWit's "many worlds" variant, Albert and Loewer's "many minds" variant, etc.), and the dynamical collapse family of theories. One particular interpretational issue that has attracted very much attention since the seminal work of John Bell, is the issue of the extent to which quantum mechanical systems do or do not admit of a local realistic description. Bell's investigation of the properties of entangled quantum systems, inspired by the famous thought experiment of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen, seems to lead one to the conclusion that the only realistic "hidden variables" interpretation compatible with the quantum mechanical formalism is a nonlocal one. In recent years, some of the attention has focused on applications of quantum mechanics and their potential for illuminating quantum foundations. These include the sciences of quantum information and quantum computation. Additional areas of research include philosophical investigation into the extensions of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics (such as quantum electrodynamics and quantum field theory more generally), as well as more formal logico-mathematical investigations into the structure of quantum states, state spaces, and their dynamics.
Key works Bohr 1928 and Heisenberg 1930 expound upon what has since become known as the 'Copenhagen interpretation' of quantum mechanics. The famous 'EPR' thought experiment of Einstein et al 1935 aims to show that quantum mechanics is an incomplete theory which should be supplemented by additional ('hidden') parameters. Bohr 1935 replies. More on Bohr's views can be found in Faye 1991, Folse 1985. Inspired by the EPR thought experiment, Bell 2004 [1964] proves what has since become known as "Bell's theorem." This, and a related result due to Kochen & Specker 1967 serve to revive the discussion of hidden variables and alternative interpretations of quantum mechanics. Jarrett 1984 analyses the key "factorisability" assumption Bell uses to derive his theorem into two distinct sub-assumptions, which Jarrett refers to as "locality" and "completeness". Two important volumes dedicated to the topics of entanglement and nonlocality are Cushing & McMullin 1989 and Maudlin 2002. Among the more discussed alternative interpretations of quantum mechanics are: Bohmian mechanics (Bohm 1952, and see also Cushing et al 1996), and Everett's relative state formulation (Everett Iii 1973). The latter gives rise to many variants, including the many worlds, many minds, and decoherence-based approaches (see Saunders et al 2010). Other notable interpretations and alternative theories include dynamical collapse theories (Ghirardi et al 1986), as well as the Copenhagen-inspired Quantum Bayesianism view (Fuchs 2003). An attempt to axiomatize quantum mechanics in terms of information theoretic constraints, and a discussion of the relevance of this for the interpretation of quantum mechanics is given in Clifton et al 2003. Discussion of this and other issues in quantum information theory can be found in: Timpson 2013. Key works in the philosophy of quantum field theory include: Redhead 1995, Redhead 1994, Ruetsche 2013, Teller 1995.
Introductions Hughes 1989 is an excellent introduction to the formalism and interpretation of quantum mechanics. Albert 1992 is another, which focuses particularly on the problem of measurement in quantum mechanics.
  Show all references
Related categories
Subcategories:
4538 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 4538
Material to categorize
  1. D. Aerts, J. Broekaert & L. Gabora (forthcoming). The Quantum Nature of Common Processes. Foundations of Science.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ernst Cassirer (1923/2003). Substance and Function. Dover Publications.
    In this double-volume work, a great modern philosopher propounds a system of thought in which Einstein's theory of relativity represents only the latest (albeit the most radical) fulfillment of the motives inherent to mathematics and the physical sciences. In the course of its exposition, it touches upon such topics as the concept of number, space and time, geometry, and energy; Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry; traditional logic and scientific method; mechanism and motion; Mayer's methodology of natural science; Richter's definite proportions; relational (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Eva Cassirer (1958). Methodology and Quantum Physics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (32):334-341.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. M. J. Rave (2008). Interpreting Quantum Interference Using a Berry's Phase-Like Quantity. Foundations of Physics 38 (12):1073-1081.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Adonai S. Sant'anna (2000). Elementary Particles, Hidden Variables, and Hidden Predicates. Synthese 125 (1-2):233 - 245.
    We recently showed that it is possible to deal withcollections of indistinguishable elementary particles (in thecontext of quantum mechanics) in a set-theoretical framework, byusing hidden variables. We propose in the presentpaper another axiomatics for collections of indiscernibleswithout hidden variables, where hidden predicates are implicitlyassumed. We also discuss the possibility of a quasi-settheoretical picture for quantum theory. Quasi-set theory, basedon Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory, was developed for dealing withcollections of indistinguishable, but, not identical objects.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. E. Santamato & B. H. Lavenda (1981). The Underlying Brownian Motion of Nonrelativistic Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 11 (9-10):653-678.
    Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics can be derived from real Markov diffusion processes by extending the concept of probability measure to the complex domain. This appears as the only natural way of introducing formally classical probabilistic concepts into quantum mechanics. To every quantum state there is a corresponding complex Fokker-Planck equation. The particle drift is conditioned by an auxiliary equation which is obtained through stochastic energy conservation; the logarithmic transform of this equation is the Schrödinger equation. To every quantum mechanical operator there (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. T. S. Santhanam (1977). Quantum Mechanics in Discrete Space and Angular Momentum. Foundations of Physics 7 (1-2):121-127.
    Recently we have studied quantum mechanics of bounded operators with a discrete spectrum. In particular, we derived an expression for the commutator[Q, P] of two bounded operators whose spectrum is discrete, and we showed that in the limit of a continuous spectrum the commutator becomes the standard one of Heisenberg. In this paper we show that the angular momentum operator and the phase operator satisfy the new commutation relation. We also briefly discuss the problem of the canonical phase operator conjugate (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. T. S. Santhanam & A. R. Tekumalla (1976). Quantum Mechanics in Finite Dimensions. Foundations of Physics 6 (5):583-587.
    We explicitly compute, following the method of Weyl, the commutator [Q, P] of the position operatorQ and the momentum operatorP of a particle when the dimension of the space on which they act is finite with a discrete spectrum; and we show that in the limit of a continuous spectrum with the dimension going to infinity this reduces to the usual relation of Heisenberg.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ruggero Maria Santilli (1997). Invariant Lie-Admissible Formulation of Quantum Deformations. Foundations of Physics 27 (8):1159-1177.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ruggero Maria Santilli (1997). Relativistic Hadronic Mechanics: Nonunitary, Axiom-Preserving Completion of Relativistic Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 27 (5):625-729.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. David Sapire (1992). General Causal Propensities, Classical and Quantum Probabilities. Philosophical Papers 21 (3):243-258.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jack Sarfatti, Progress in Post-Quantum Theory.
    David Bohm, in his "causal theory", made the correct Hegelian synthesis of Einstein's thesis that there is a "there" there, and Bohr's antithesis of "thinglessness" (Nick Herbert’s term). Einstein was a materialist and Bohr was an idealist. Bohm showed that quantum reality has both. This is “physical dualism” (my term). Physical dualism may be a low energy approximation to a deeper monism of cosmic consciousness called "the super-implicate order" (Bohm and Hiley’s term), “pregeometry” (Wheeler’s term), “substratum” (Dirac’s term), “funda-MENTAL space” (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2013). The Δ-Quantum Machine, the K-Model, and the Non-Ordinary Spatiality of Quantum Entities. Foundations of Science 18 (1):11-41.
    The purpose of this article is threefold. Firstly, it aims to present, in an educational and non-technical fashion, the main ideas at the basis of Aerts’ creation-discovery view and hidden measurement approach : a fundamental explanatory framework whose importance, in this author’s view, has been seriously underappreciated by the physics community, despite its success in clarifying many conceptual challenges of quantum physics. Secondly, it aims to introduce a new quantum machine—that we call the δ quantum machine —which is able to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (2012). From Permanence to Total Availability: A Quantum Conceptual Upgrade. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 17 (3):223-244.
    Abstract We consider the classical concept of time of permanence and observe that its quantum equivalent is described by a bona fide self-adjoint operator. Its interpretation, by means of the spectral theorem, reveals that we have to abandon not only the idea that quantum entities would be characterizable in terms of spatial trajectories but, more generally, that they would possess the very attribute of spatiality . Consequently, a permanence time shouldn’t be interpreted as a “time” in quantum mechanics, but as (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ramchander R. Sastry & John R. Klauder (1997). Discontinuous Perturbations. Foundations of Physics 27 (1):81-91.
    Perturbations of quantum systems ranging from oscillators to fields can be either continuous or discontinuous functions of the coupling. The system under consideration is the familiar harmonic oscillator in one degree of freedom. Previous studies have shown that when the harmonic oscillator is subjected to a perturbation with a power law singularity, a permanent change in the system characteristics is observed for a specific range of power law values. The introduction of a logarithmic singularity into the power law potential fine (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jeffrey Satinover (2006). Quantum Theory and the Boundary Between Science and Spirit: Some Remarks From a Friend of Kabbalah. World Futures 62 (4):300 – 308.
    Physicists and philosophers argue whether quantum theory has spiritual implications. The vast majority of opinions are at two extremes: Some contend that quantum theory has absolutely no spiritual implications whatsoever, whereas others assert that it forms the very basis of a modern spirituality and can be directly applied to the human condition. It is this article's contention that neither extreme is correct. Quantum theory does have spiritual implications - a fact that its founders intuited and its enemies, Einstein preeminent among (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nicholas T. Saunders (2000). Does God Cheat at Dice? Divine Action and Quantum Possibilities. Zygon 35 (3):517-544.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Simon Saunders (2006). Are Quantum Particles Objects? Analysis 66 (289):52–63.
    Particle indistinguishability has always been considered a purely quantum mechanical concept. In parallel, indistinguishable particles have been thought to be entities that are not properly speaking objects at all. I argue, to the contrary, that the concept can equally be applied to classical particles, and that in either case particles may (with certain exceptions) be counted as objects even though they are indistinguishable. The exceptions are elementary bosons (for example photons).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Simon Saunders (2006). On the Explanation for Quantum Statistics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (1):192-211.
    The concept of classical indistinguishability is analyzed and defended against a number of well-known criticisms, with particular attention to the Gibbs’paradox. Granted that it is as much at home in classical as in quantum statistical mechanics, the question arises as to why indistinguishability, in quantum mechanics but not in classical mechanics, forces a change in statistics. The answer, illustrated with simple examples, is that the equilibrium measure on classical phase space is continuous, whilst on Hilbert space it is discrete. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Simon Saunders (2003). Critical Notice: Tian Yu Cao's “the Conceptual Development of 20th Century Field Theories”. Synthese 136 (1):79-105.
    Tian Yu Cao has written a serious and scholarly book covering a great deal of physics. He ranges from classical relativity theory, both special and general, to relativistic quantum …eld theory, including non-Abelian gauge theory, renormalization theory, and symmetry-breaking, presenting a detailed and very rich picture of the mainstream developments in quantum physics; a remarkable feat. It has, moreover, a philosophical message: according to Cao, the development of these theories is inconsistent with a Kuhnian view of theory change, and supports (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lothar Schafer (2006). A Response to Stanley Klein: A Dialogue on the Relevance of Quantum Theory to Religion. Zygon 41 (3):593-598.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Richard Schlegel (1980). Superposition & Interaction: Coherence in Physics. University of Chicago Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Richard Schlegel (1979). Quantum Physics and the Divine Postulate. Zygon 14 (2):163-185.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Bert Schroer (2013). Modular Localization and the Foundational Origin of Integrability. Foundations of Physics 43 (3):329-372.
    The main aim of this work is to relate integrability in QFT with a complete particle interpretation directly to the principle of causal localization, circumventing the standard method of finding sufficiently many conservation laws. Its precise conceptual-mathematical formulation as “modular localization” within the setting of local operator algebras also suggests novel ways of looking at general (non-integrable) QFTs which are not based on quantizing classical field theories.Conformal QFT, which is known to admit no particle interpretation, suggest the presence of a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Bert Schroer (2011). Bondi-Metzner-Sachs Symmetry, Holography on Null-Surfaces and Area Proportionality of “Light-Slice” Entropy. Foundations of Physics 41 (2):204-241.
    It is shown that certain kinds of behavior, which hitherto were expected to be characteristic for classical gravity and quantum field theory in curved spacetime, as the infinite dimensional Bondi-Metzner-Sachs symmetry, holography on event horizons and an area proportionality of entropy, have in fact an unnoticed presence in Minkowski QFT.This casts new light on the fundamental question whether the volume proportionality of heat bath entropy and the (logarithmically corrected) dimensionless area law obeyed by localization-induced thermal behavior are different geometric parametrizations (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. F. Selleri (1987). Coherence Properties of Photon Amplifiers. Foundations of Physics 17 (8):739-757.
    The traditional approach to light amplification is shown to be based on the idea that photons of the incoming beam act as independent particles. If atomic stimulation is instead attributed to the action of the wave, a different photon distribution is obtained in the final state. The new distribution turns out to be Poissonian, in agreement with some experimental evidence. The expected rate of coincidences for an empty-wave amplification experiment is calculated, and found up to 30% higher than obtained from (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. F. Selleri (1982). On the Direct Observability of Quantum Waves. Foundations of Physics 12 (11):1087-1112.
    Fundamental experiments on the dual nature of atomic entities (photons, electrons, neutrons, etc.) can be interpreted in terms of “empty” waves not carrying energy and momentum. Similar points of view were advanced in famous papers by Einstein, de Broglie, Bohr, and Born. Recent proposals could lead to experimental tests of this idea, using low intensity photon beams, thanks to modern experimental apparatuses.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Franco Selleri (1981). Quantum Mechanics Reality and Separability. Editrice Compositori.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. O. V. Selyugin & O. V. Teryaev (2010). A Gravitational Potential with Extra-Dimensions and Spin Effects in Hadronic Reactions. Foundations of Physics 40 (7):1042-1050.
    The impact of the KK-modes in d-brane models of gravity with large compactification radii and TeV-scale quantum gravity on the hadronic potential at small impact parameters is examined. The effects of the gravitational hadron form factors obtained from the hadron generalized parton distributions (GPDs) on the behavior of the gravitational potential and the possible spin correlation effects are also analysed.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. R. N. Sen (2008). Physics and the Measurement of Continuous Variables. Foundations of Physics 38 (4):301-316.
    This paper addresses the doubts voiced by Wigner about the physical relevance of the concept of geometrical points by exploiting some facts known to all but honored by none: Almost all real numbers are transcendental; the explicit representation of any one will require an infinite amount of physical resources. An instrument devised to measure a continuous real variable will need a continuum of internal states to achieve perfect resolution. Consequently, a laboratory instrument for measuring a continuous variable in a finite (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Niall Shanks (1993). Quantum Mechanics and Determinism. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (170):20-37.
  32. W. David Sharp & Niall Shanks (1993). The Rise and Fall of Time-Symmetrized Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 60 (3):488-499.
    In the context of a discussion of time symmetry in the quantum mechanical measurement process, Aharonov et al. (1964) derived an expression concerning probabilities for the outcomes of measurements conducted on systems which have been pre- and postselected on the basis of both preceding and succeeding measurements. Recent literature has claimed that a resulting "time-symmetrized" interpretation of quantum mechanics has significant implications for some basic issues, such as contextuality and determinateness, in elementary, nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Bub and Brown (1986) have (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Daniel P. Sheehan (ed.) (2011). Quantum Retrocausation: Theory and Experiment: San Diego, California, Usa, 13-14 June 2011. American Institute of Physics.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Daniel P. Sheehan (ed.) (2006). Frontiers of Time: Retrocausation--Experiment and Theory: San Diego, California, 20-22 June 2006. American Institute of Physics.
    Traditional causation posits that the past alone influences the present. In principle, however, the basic laws of physics permit the future an equal measure of influence: retrocausation. This symposium explores theoretical developments and experimental evidence for retrocausation. It is unique in stressing recent experiments in this exciting and potentially important new field.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. OR Shenker (1999). Is - Ktr(Ln) the Entropy in Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (1):33-48.
    In quantum mechanics, the expression for entropy is usually taken to be -kTr(ln), where is the density matrix. The convention first appears in Von Neumann's Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. The argument given there to justify this convention is the only one hitherto offered. All the arguments in the field refer to it at one point or another. Here this argument is shown to be invalid. Moreover, it is shown that, if entropy is -kTr(ln), then perpetual motion machines are possible. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Orly R. Shenker, Science: Freedom and Reason, Comments on Mara Beller's 'Quantum Dialogue'.
    Mara Beller's book Quantum Dialogue: The Making of a Revolution is a book in history and historiography, which invites a philosophical reading. The book offers a new and quite radical approach in the philosophy of science, which Beller calls dialogism, and it demonstrates the application of this approach by studying cases in the history of physics. This paper reconstructs of some of the book's theses, in a way which emphasises its philosophical insights, and goes on to shows how philosophically far (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. George W. Shields (2010). Panexperientialism, Quantum Theory, and Neuroplasticity. In Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.), Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press.
  38. Abner Shimony (2005). An Analysis of Ensembles That Are Both Pre- and Post-Selected. Foundations of Physics 35 (2):215-232.
    The idea of ensembles which are both pre- and post-selected was introduced by Aharonov, Bergmann, and Lebowitz and developed by Aharonov and his school. To derive formulae for the probabilities of outcomes of a measurement performed on such an ensemble at a time intermediate between pre-selection and post-selection, the latter group introduces a two-vector formulation of quantum mechanics, one vector propagating in the forward direction in time and one in the backward direction. The formulae which they obtain by this radical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Abner Shimony (2005). Comment on Norsen's Defense of Einstein's “Box Argument'. American Journal of Physics 73:177--178.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Abner Shimony (1993). Search for a Naturalistic Worldview, Volume 2: Natural Science and Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Abner Shimony (1985). Review of Folse (1985). [REVIEW] Physics Today 38:108--109.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Abner Shimony (1983). Reflections on the Philosophy of Bohr, Heisenberg, and Schrödinger. In R. S. Cohen (ed.), Physics, Philosophy, and Psychoanalysis: Essays in Honor of Adolf Grünbaum. D. Reidel Publishing Company. 209--221.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Abner Shimony (1978). Metaphysical Problems in the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (1):3-17.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Abner Shimony (1971). Filters with Infinitely Many Components. Foundations of Physics 1 (4):325-328.
    With the use of a suitable assumption about the structure of the class of experimental filters, it is shown that the sequence of alternating replicas of two filters is their greatest lower bound, as Jauch suggests. A generalization of his suggestion yields the greatest lower bound of a denumerable set of filters. The criteria of admissibility of filters are briefly discussed.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Vandana Shiva (1980). Are Quantum Mechanical Transition Probabilities Classical? A Critique of Cartwright's Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Synthese 44 (3):501 - 508.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. K. S. Shrader-Frechette (1982). Quark Quantum Numbers and the Problem of Microphysical Observation. Synthese 50 (1):125 - 145.
    The main question addressed in this essay is whether quarks have been observed in any sense and, if so, what might be meant by this use of the term, observation. In the first (or introductory) section of the paper, I explain that well-known researchers are divided on the answers to these important questions. In the second section, I investigate microphysical observation in general. Here I argue that Wilson's analogy between observation by means of high-energy accelerators and observation by means of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Patrick Sibelius (1990). Natural Contradictions and the Concept of Action in Mechanics. Distribution, Tidningsbokhandeln.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Patrick Sibelius (1990). The Mechanical and the Wave-Theoretical Aspects of Momentum Considering Discrete Action. Foundations of Physics 20 (9):1033-1059.
    The mechanical aspect of momentum, basically its role as a tangent vector of the trajectory of the particle, is related to properties of the momentum found in the contexts of Hamilton's optico-mechanical analogy, de Broglie's matter waves, and quantum mechanics. These properties are treated in a systematic way by considering an approximation of the particle mechanical action of the particle by a step function. A special method of discretizing partial differential equations is shown to be required. Using this method, a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Patrick Sibelius (1989). An Interpretation Within Philosophy of the Relationship Between Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 19 (11):1315-1326.
    A mapping of a finite directed graph onto a curve in space-time is considered. The mapping induces the dynamics of a free particle moving along the curve. The distinction between the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian formulation of particle mechanics is expressed in terms of the distinction between referring to a particle in space and time and referring to the points in space which the particle occupies, respectively. These elements are combined to yield an interpretation of Feynman's path integral formulation of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Armand Siegel (1970). Distinguishable Equivalent Particles with Symmetrized Wave Functions. Foundations of Physics 1 (1):57-68.
    The quantum formalism ofdistinguishable, yetequivalent particles (with symmetric or antisymmetric wave functions) is here worked out. The result is an entirely explicit formulation of the way in which classical mechanics emerges from quantum mechanics for such particles. Distinguishability is achieved at the cost of dynamical precision; the two are, in fact, complementary.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 4538