Bookmark and Share

Quantum Mechanics

Edited by Michael Cuffaro (Ludwig Maximilians Universität, München)
Assistant editors: Radin Dardashti, Brian Padden
About this topic
Summary Issues in the philosophy of quantum mechanics include first and foremost, its interpretation. Probably the most well-known of these is the 'orthodox' Copenhagen interpretation associated with Neils Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Wolfgang Pauli, John von Neumann, and others. Beginning roughly at the midway point of the previous century, philosophers' attention began to be drawn towards alternative interpretations of the theory, including Bohmian mechanics, the relative state formulation of quantum mechanics and its variants (i.e., DeWit's "many worlds" variant, Albert and Loewer's "many minds" variant, etc.), and the dynamical collapse family of theories. One particular interpretational issue that has attracted very much attention since the seminal work of John Bell, is the issue of the extent to which quantum mechanical systems do or do not admit of a local realistic description. Bell's investigation of the properties of entangled quantum systems, inspired by the famous thought experiment of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen, seems to lead one to the conclusion that the only realistic "hidden variables" interpretation compatible with the quantum mechanical formalism is a nonlocal one. In recent years, some of the attention has focused on applications of quantum mechanics and their potential for illuminating quantum foundations. These include the sciences of quantum information and quantum computation. Additional areas of research include philosophical investigation into the extensions of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics (such as quantum electrodynamics and quantum field theory more generally), as well as more formal logico-mathematical investigations into the structure of quantum states, state spaces, and their dynamics.
Key works Bohr 1928 and Heisenberg 1930 expound upon what has since become known as the 'Copenhagen interpretation' of quantum mechanics. The famous 'EPR' thought experiment of Einstein et al 1935 aims to show that quantum mechanics is an incomplete theory which should be supplemented by additional ('hidden') parameters. Bohr 1935 replies. More on Bohr's views can be found in Faye 1991, Folse 1985. Inspired by the EPR thought experiment, Bell 2004 [1964] proves what has since become known as "Bell's theorem." This, and a related result due to Kochen & Specker 1967 serve to revive the discussion of hidden variables and alternative interpretations of quantum mechanics. Jarrett 1984 analyses the key "factorisability" assumption Bell uses to derive his theorem into two distinct sub-assumptions, which Jarrett refers to as "locality" and "completeness". Two important volumes dedicated to the topics of entanglement and nonlocality are Cushing & McMullin 1989 and Maudlin 2002. Among the more discussed alternative interpretations of quantum mechanics are: Bohmian mechanics (Bohm 1952, and see also Cushing et al 1996), and Everett's relative state formulation (Everett Iii 1973). The latter gives rise to many variants, including the many worlds, many minds, and decoherence-based approaches (see Saunders et al 2010). Other notable interpretations and alternative theories include dynamical collapse theories (Ghirardi et al 1986), as well as the Copenhagen-inspired Quantum Bayesianism view (Fuchs 2003). An attempt to axiomatize quantum mechanics in terms of information theoretic constraints, and a discussion of the relevance of this for the interpretation of quantum mechanics is given in Clifton et al 2003. Discussion of this and other issues in quantum information theory can be found in: Timpson 2013. Key works in the philosophy of quantum field theory include: Redhead 1995, Redhead 1994, Ruetsche 2013, Teller 1995.
Introductions Hughes 1989 is an excellent introduction to the formalism and interpretation of quantum mechanics. Albert 1992 is another, which focuses particularly on the problem of measurement in quantum mechanics.
  Show all references
Related categories
Subcategories:
4698 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 4698
Material to categorize
  1. D. Aerts, J. Broekaert & L. Gabora (forthcoming). The Quantum Nature of Common Processes. Foundations of Science.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ernst Cassirer (1923/2003). Substance and Function. Dover Publications.
    In this double-volume work, a great modern philosopher propounds a system of thought in which Einstein's theory of relativity represents only the latest (albeit the most radical) fulfillment of the motives inherent to mathematics and the physical sciences. In the course of its exposition, it touches upon such topics as the concept of number, space and time, geometry, and energy; Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry; traditional logic and scientific method; mechanism and motion; Mayer's methodology of natural science; Richter's definite proportions; relational (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Eva Cassirer (1958). Methodology and Quantum Physics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (32):334-341.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. M. J. Rave (2008). Interpreting Quantum Interference Using a Berry's Phase-Like Quantity. Foundations of Physics 38 (12):1073-1081.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Abner Shimony (1978). Metaphysical Problems in the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (1):3-17.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. R. Wang, M. Wise & C. D. (1998). The Culture of Quantum Chaos. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 29 (3):369-389.
    Almost 20 years ago the United States and China established a program for exchange of government publications through their two national libraries, the Library of Congress (LC) and the National Library of China (NLC). Both sides have made tremendous efforts to honor the exchange agreement, although LC hopes to receive more comparable materials from its counterpart. The recent shift to electronic formats in the United States and the government Internet censorship in China pose serious challenges to the existence of this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Tiansi Wang (2009). Zhe Xue Miao Shu Lun Yin Lun. Shanghai Ren Min Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Zheng Wang, Jerome R. Busemeyer, Harald Atmanspacher & Emmanuel M. Pothos (2013). The Potential of Using Quantum Theory to Build Models of Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (4):672-688.
    Quantum cognition research applies abstract, mathematical principles of quantum theory to inquiries in cognitive science. It differs fundamentally from alternative speculations about quantum brain processes. This topic presents new developments within this research program. In the introduction to this topic, we try to answer three questions: Why apply quantum concepts to human cognition? How is quantum cognitive modeling different from traditional cognitive modeling? What cognitive processes have been modeled using a quantum account? In addition, a brief introduction to quantum probability (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Noboru Watanabe (2011). Note on Entropies of Quantum Dynamical Systems. Foundations of Physics 41 (3):549-563.
    We review some techniques and notions for quantum information theory. It is shown that the dynamical entropies is discussed and some numerical computations of these entropies are carried for several states.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. P. Watson & A. J. Bracken (2014). Quantum Phase Space From Schwinger's Measurement Algebra. Foundations of Physics 44 (7):762-780.
    Schwinger’s algebra of microscopic measurement, with the associated complex field of transformation functions, is shown to provide the foundation for a discrete quantum phase space of known type, equipped with a Wigner function and a star product. Discrete position and momentum variables label points in the phase space, each taking \(N\) distinct values, where \(N\) is any chosen prime number. Because of the direct physical interpretation of the measurement symbols, the phase space structure is thereby related to definite experimental configurations.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Andrew Wayne (1996). Book Review:Quantum Mechanics: Historical Contingency and the Copenhagen Hegemony James T. Cushing. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 63 (3):478-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. James Owen Weatherall (2013). The Scope and Generality of Bell's Theorem. Foundations of Physics 43 (9):1153-1169.
    I present what might seem to be a local, deterministic model of the EPR-Bohm experiment, inspired by recent work by Joy Christian, that appears at first blush to be in tension with Bell-type theorems. I argue that the model ultimately fails to do what a hidden variable theory needs to do, but that it is interesting nonetheless because the way it fails helps clarify the scope and generality of Bell-type theorems. I formulate and prove a minor proposition that makes explicit (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kirk Wegter-McNelly (2011). The Entangled God: Divine Relationality and Quantum Physics. Routledge.
    Setting the stage -- Relationality in contemporary theology -- Separateness in classical physics -- Entanglement in quantum physics -- Philosophical perspectives -- Entanglement, theologically speaking.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. A. Wehrl (1979). A Remark on the Concavity of Entropy. Foundations of Physics 9 (11-12):939-946.
    We investigate to what extent theorems about quantum mechanical or classical entropy can be generalized to functionals of the type ρ→Tr f(ρ), or ψ→∫f(ψ)dμ, respectively, wheref is an arbitrary concave function.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Steven Weinstein (2001). Absolute Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):67-73.
    Whereas one can conceive of a relational classical mechanics in which absolute space and time do not play a fundamental role, quantum mechanics does not readily admit any such relational formulation.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Steven Weinstein (2001). Absolute Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):67-73.
    Whereas one can conceive of a relational classical mechanics in which absolute space and time do not play a fundamental role, quantum mechanics does not readily admit any such relational formulation.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Steven Weinstein (1996). Undermind. Synthese 106 (2):241 - 251.
    David Albert and Barry Loewer have proposed a new interpretation of quantum mechanics which they call the Many Minds interpretation, according to which there are infinitely many minds associated with a given (physical) state of a brain. This interpretation is related to the family of many worlds interpretations insofar as it assumes strictly unitary (Schrödinger) time-evolution of quantum-mechanical systems (no "reduction of the wave-packet"). The Many Minds interpretation itself is principally motivated by an argument which purports to show that the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. M. A. B. Whitaker (2008). Can the Statistical Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics Be Inferred From the Schrödinger Equation?—Bell and Gottfried. Foundations of Physics 38 (5):436-447.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. N. Wiener (1934). Quantum Mechanics, Haldane, and Leibniz. Philosophy of Science 1 (4):479-482.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Mark M. Wilde & Ari Mizel (2012). Addressing the Clumsiness Loophole in a Leggett-Garg Test of Macrorealism. Foundations of Physics 42 (2):256-265.
    The rise of quantum information theory has lent new relevance to experimental tests for non-classicality, particularly in controversial cases such as adiabatic quantum computing superconducting circuits. The Leggett-Garg inequality is a “Bell inequality in time” designed to indicate whether a single quantum system behaves in a macrorealistic fashion. Unfortunately, a violation of the inequality can only show that the system is either (i) non-macrorealistic or (ii) macrorealistic but subjected to a measurement technique that happens to disturb the system. The “clumsiness” (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lawrence Wilets (1986). Momentum Projection of Solitons Including Quantum Corrections. Foundations of Physics 16 (2):171-185.
    The method of projection is applied to a relativistic field theory of fermions interacting with a nonlinear scalar field, specifically the Friedberg-Lee soliton model. Projection is effected by operating on a localized “bag” state with the translation operator exp (iP·Z), and integrating overZ. The resulting state is an eigenstate of zero momentum. The energy and the expectation value of other physical operators can be expressed as Gaussian moments of the Hamiltonian or the physical operator times powers of the momentum operator (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Virginia Parrott Williams (1987). Surrealism, Quantum Philosophy, and World War I. Garland.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Robert Anton Wilson (1990). Quantum Psychology: How Brain Software Programs You and Your World. New Falcon.
  24. Eric Winsberg (2003). Quantum Life: Interaction, Entanglement, and Separation. Journal of Philosophy 100 (2):80 - 97.
    Violations of the Bell inequalities in EPR-Bohm type experiments have set the literature on the metaphysics of microscopic systems to flirting with some sort of metaphysical holism regarding spatially separated, entangled systems. The rationale for this behavior comes in two parts. The first part relies on the proof, due to Jon Jarrett [2] that the experimentally observed violations of the Bell inequalities entail violations of the conjunction of two probabilistic constraints. Jarrett called these two constraints locality and completeness. We prefer (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. H. M. Wiseman (1998). Extending Heisenberg's Measurement-Disturbance Relation to the Twin-Slit Case. Foundations of Physics 28 (11):1619-1631.
    Heisenberg's position-measurement-momentum-disturbance relation is derivable from the uncertainty relation σ(q)σ(p) ≥ h/2 only for the case when the particle is initially in a momentum eigenstate. Here I derive a new measurement-disturbance relation which applies when the particle is prepared in a twin-slit superposition and the measurement can determine at which slit the particle is present. The relation is d × Δp ≥ 2h/π, where d is the slit separation and Δp = DM(Pf, Pi) is the Monge distance between the initial (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Norman M. Witriol (1975). General Quantum Mechanical Canonical Point Transformations. Foundations of Physics 5 (4):591-605.
    Problems related to the operator form of the generalized canonical momenta in quantum mechanics are resolved by use of the general quantum mechanical canonical point transformation method. This method can be applied to any general canonical point transformation irrespective of the relationship between the domains of the original and transformed variables. The differential representation of the original canonical momenta pi in the original coordinate space is −i $\begin{array}{*{20}c} / \\ h \\ \end{array}$ ∂/∂x i and of the transformed canonical momentap (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. C. Wolf (1990). Testing Discrete Quantum Mechanics Using Neutron Interferometry and the Superposition Principle—Agedanken Experiment. Foundations of Physics 20 (1):133-137.
    Using a neutron interferometer and the phase difference calculated from spatial discrete quantum mechanics, a test for discrete quantum theory may implemented by measuring the X spin polarization and its variation with position.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Fred Alan Wolf (1996). On the Quantum Mechanics of Dreams and the Emergence of Self-Awareness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press.
  29. C. H. Woo (1989). Chaos, Ineffectiveness, and the Contrast Between Classical and Quantal Physics. Foundations of Physics 19 (1):57-76.
    Classical and quantal physics are fundamentally different in the way that each deals with complexity. We examine both the algorithmic and the computational aspects of this difference. Any comprehensive deterministic theory must contain a certain ineffectiveness in producing long-term predictions of the future, whereas a probabilistic theory is not so handicapped. The relevance of these considerations to chaos is discussed.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Brian A. Woodcock (2007). Bloch's Paradox and the Nonlocality of Chance. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (2):137 – 156.
    I show how an almost exclusive focus on the simplest case - the case of a single particle - along with the commonplace conception of the single-particle wave function as a scalar field on spacetime contributed to the perception, first brought to light by I. Bloch, that there existed a contradiction between quantum theory with instantaneous state collapses and special relativity. The incompatibility is merely apparent since treating wave-function values as hypersurface dependent avoids the contradiction. After clarifying confusions which fueled (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. James F. Woodward (2001). Gravity, Inertia, and Quantum Vacuum Zero Point Fields. Foundations of Physics 31 (5):819-835.
    Over the past several years Haisch, Rueda, and others have made the claim that the origin of inertial reaction forces can be explained as the interaction of electrically charged elementary particles with the vacuum electromagnetic zero-point field expected on the basis of quantum field theory. After pointing out that this claim, in light of the fact that the inertial masses of the hadrons reside in the electrically chargeless, photon-like gluons that bind their constituent quarks, is untenable, the question of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. James F. Woodward & Thomas Mahood (1999). What is the Cause of Inertia? Foundations of Physics 29 (6):899-930.
    The question of the cause of inertial reaction forces and the validity of “Mach's principle” are investigated. A recent claim that the cause of inertial reaction forces can be attributed to an interaction of the electrical charge of elementary particles with the hypothetical quantum mechanical “zero-point” fluctuation electromagnetic field is shown to be untenable. It fails to correspond to reality because the coupling of electric charge to the electromagnetic field cannot be made to mimic plausibly the universal coupling of gravity (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Nancy J. Woolf & Stuart R. Hameroff (2001). A Quantum Approach to Visual Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (11):472-478.
  34. W. K. Wootters (2006). Quantum Measurements and Finite Geometry. Foundations of Physics 36 (1):112-126.
    A complete set of mutually unbiased bases for a Hilbert space of dimension N is analogous in some respects to a certain finite geometric structure, namely, an affine plane. Another kind of quantum measurement, known as a symmetric informationally complete positive-operator-valued measure, is, remarkably, also analogous to an affine plane, but with the roles of points and lines interchanged. In this paper I present these analogies and ask whether they shed any light on the existence or non-existence of such symmetric (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. William K. Wootters (2012). Entanglement Sharing in Real-Vector-Space Quantum Theory. Foundations of Physics 42 (1):19-28.
    The limitation on the sharing of entanglement is a basic feature of quantum theory. For example, if two qubits are completely entangled with each other, neither of them can be at all entangled with any other object. In this paper we show, at least for a certain standard definition of entanglement, that this feature is lost when one replaces the usual complex vector space of quantum states with a real vector space. Moreover, the difference between the two theories is extreme: (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. William K. Wootters (1990). Random Quantum States. Foundations of Physics 20 (11):1365-1378.
    This paper examines the statistical properties of random quantum states, for four different kinds of random state:(1) a pure state chosen at random with respect to the uniform measure on the unit sphere in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space;(2) a random pure state in a real space;(3) a pure state chosen at random except that a certain expectation value is fixed;(4) a random mixed state with fixed eigenvalues. For the first two of these, we give examples of simple states of a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. William K. Wootters (1986). Quantum Mechanics Without Probability Amplitudes. Foundations of Physics 16 (4):391-405.
    First steps are taken toward a formulation of quantum mechanics which avoids the use of probability amplitudes and is expressed entirely in terms of observable probabilities. Quantum states are represented not by state vectors or density matrices but by “probability tables,” which contain only the probabilities of the outcomes of certain special measurements. The rule for computing transition probabilities, normally given by the squared modulus of the inner product of two state vectors, is re-expressed in terms of probability tables. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Rollin W. Workman (1959). Is Indeterminism Supported by Quantum Theory? Philosophy of Science 26 (3):251-259.
    Two initially different arguments for indeterminism are often based either upon the Uncertainty Relations or the statistical interpretation of the wave equation of quantum mechanics. Both arguments ultimately involve three factors: (1) the assumption that elementary entities are enough like classical particles for it to make sense to say they are either determined or indetermined, (2) the fact that no exact measurements are possible of quantities supposed to characterize elementary entities, (3) the pragmatic supposition that determinism is false unless exact (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics
  1. Constantin Antonopoulos (2005). Making the Quantum of Relevance. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):223 - 241.
    The two Heisenberg Uncertainties (UR) entail an incompatibility between the two pairs of conjugated variables E, t and p, q. But incompatibility comes in two kinds, exclusive of one another. There is incompatibility defineable as: (p → -q) & (q → -p) or defineable as [(p → -q) & (q → -p)] ↔ r. The former kind is unconditional, the latter conditional. The former, in accordance, is fact independent, and thus a matter of logic, the latter fact dependent, and thus (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. A. Arensburg & L. P. Horwitz (1992). A First-Order Equation for Spin in a Manifestly Relativistically Covariant Quantum Theory. Foundations of Physics 22 (8):1025-1039.
    Relativistic quantum mechanics has been formulated as a theory of the evolution ofevents in spacetime; the wave functions are square-integrable functions on the four-dimensional spacetime, parametrized by a universal invariant world time τ. The representation of states with spin is induced with a little group that is the subgroup of O(3, 1) leaving invariant a timelike vector nμ; a positive definite invariant scalar product, for which matrix elements of tensor operators are covariant, emerges from this construction. In a previous study (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. J. C. Aron (1981). Stochastic Foundation for Microphysics. A Critical Analysis. Foundations of Physics 11 (9-10):699-720.
    The stochastic scheme proposed in a previous paper as subjacent to quantum mechanics is analyzed in the light of the difficulties and criticisms encountered by similar attempts. It is shown that the limitation of the domain where the theory is valid gives a reply to the criticisms, but restricts its practical usefulness to the description of basic features. A stochastic approach of the hadron mass spectrum, allowing the scheme to emerge in the domain of experimental verification (to be worked out (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard T. W. Arthur (1981). Book Review:Quantum Mechanics, a Half Century Later J.L. Lopes, M. Paty. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 48 (1):156-.
  5. Alain Aspect & Robin Kaiser (1990). Linear Momentum Conservation in Coherent Population Trapping: A Case Study for a Quantum Filtering Process. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 20 (12):1413-1428.
    We discuss the question of linear momentum conservation when an atom coupled to a laser field enters into a state which is not an eigenstate of the linear momentum. Such a situation happens in the recently demonstrated laser cooling of atoms by velocity selective coherent population trapping. We show that this process can be understood as a filtering of the atomic state by the laser field taken as a classical measuring apparatus. In a different approach, the laser field can be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. D. Atkinson (1998). The Light of Quantum Mechanics. Dialectica 52 (2):103–126.
    It is argued that while classical probability theory, as it is encapsulated in the axioms of Kolmogorov and in his criterion for the independence of two events, can consistently be employed in quantum mechanics, this can only be accomplished at an exorbitant price. By considering rst the classic two-slit experiment, and then the passage of one photon through three polarizers, the applicability of Kolmogorov's last axiom is called into question, but the standard rebu of the Copenhagen interpretation is shown to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael N. Audi (1973). Book Review:Perspectives in Quantum Theory: Essays in Honor of Alfred Lande Wolfgang Yourgrau, Alwyn Van Der Merwe. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 40 (2):323-.
  8. Jürgen Audretsch & Klaus Mainzer (eds.) (1990). Wieviele Leben Hat Schrödingers Katze? Bibliographisches Institut.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Gennaro Auletta (2005). Quantum Information as a General Paradigm. Foundations of Physics 35 (5):787-815.
    Quantum–mechanical systems may be understood in terms of information. When they interact, they modify the information they carry or represent in two, and only two, ways: by selecting a part of the initial amount of (potential) information and by sharing information with other systems. As a consequence, quantum systems are informationally shielded. These features are shown to be general features of nature. In particular, it is shown that matter arises from quantum–mechanical processes through the constitution of larger ensembles that share (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Guido Bacciagaluppi (2013). Insolubility Theorems and EPR Argument. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (1):87-100.
    I present a very general and simple argument—based on the no-signalling theorem—showing that within the framework of the unitary Schrödinger equation it is impossible to reproduce the phenomenological description of quantum mechanical measurements (in particular the collapse of the state of the measured system) by assuming a suitable mixed initial state of the apparatus. The thrust of the argument is thus similar to that of the ‘insolubility theorems’ for the measurement problem of quantum mechanics (which, however, focus on the impossibility (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Guido Bacciagaluppi & Michael Dickson (1999). Dynamics for Modal Interpretations. Foundations of Physics 29 (8):1165-1201.
    An outstanding problem in so-called modal interpretations of quantum mechanics has been the specification of a dynamics for the properties introduced in such interpretations. We develop a general framework (in the context of the theory of stochastic processes) for specifying a dynamics for interpretations in this class, focusing on the modal interpretation by Vermaas and Dieks. This framework admits many empirically equivalent dynamics. We give some examples, and discuss some of the properties of one of them. This approach is applicable (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alexander Bach (1988). The Concept of Indistinguishable Particles in Classical and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 18 (6):639-649.
    The consequences of the following definition of indistinguishability are analyzed. Indistinguishable classical or quantum particles are identical classical or quantum particles in a state characterized by a probability measure, a statistical operator respectively, which is invariant under any permutation of the particles. According to this definition the particles of classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics are indistinguishable.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 4698