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Aristotle: Ethics* (1,231 | 544)
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  1. Overstraining Human Nature in the 'Nicomachean Ethics'.Doug Reed - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    In this paper I investigate Aristotle’s claim in 'Nicomachean Ethics' 3.1 about situations that “overstrain human nature.” By setting out and answering several interpretative questions about such situations, I offer a comprehensive interpretation of this passage. I argue that in (at least some of) these cases, the agent voluntarily does something wrong, even though there is a right action available. Furthermore, I argue that Aristotle would think it is possible for a rare agent to perform the right action in (at (...)
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  2. The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Ethics, Edited by Christopher Bobonich. [REVIEW]David J. Riesbeck - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):359-366.
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  3. The Value of Critical Knowledge, Ethics and Education: Philosophical History Bringing Epistemic and Critical Values to Values.Ignace Haaz - 2019 - Geneva, Switzerland: Globethics Publications.
    This book aims at six important conceptual tools developed by philosophers. The author develops each particular view in a chapter, hoping to constitute at the end a concise, interesting and easily readable whole. These concepts are: 1. Ethics and realism: elucidation of the distinction between understanding and explanation – the lighthouse type of normativity. 2. Leadership, antirealism and moral psychology – the lightning rod type of normativity. 3. Bright light on self-identity and positive reciprocity – the reciprocity type of normativity. (...)
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  4. Good Behaviour - C. Skidmore: Practical Ethics for Roman Gentlemen: The Work of Valerius Maximus. Pp Xvii + 142. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1996. £30. ISBN: 0-85989-477-0. [REVIEW]W. Bloomer - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):52-54.
  5. C. Horn: Antike Lebenskunst: Glück Und Moral von Sokrates Bis Zu den Neuplatonikern . Pp. 271. Munich: C. H. Beck, 1998. Paper, DM 24. ISBN: 3-406-42071-. [REVIEW]James Warren - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (1):334-334.
  6. Ancient Ethics.Eugenio Benitez - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (2):430-432.
  7. Aristotle on the Heterogeneity of Pleasure.Matthew Strohl - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History.
    In Nicomachean Ethics X.5, Aristotle gives a series of arguments for the claim that pleasures differ from one another in kind in accordance with the differences in kind among the activities they arise in connection with. I develop an interpretation of these arguments based on an interpretation of his theory of pleasure (which I have defended elsewhere) according to which pleasure is the perfection of perfect activity. In the course of developing this interpretation, I reconstruct Aristotle’s phenomenology of pleasure, arguing (...)
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  8. Lucretius on the Nature of Parental Love.Sean McConnell - 2018 - Antichthon 52:72-89.
  9. Disagreement and Reception. Peripatetics Responding to the Stoic Challenge.Jan Szaif - 2016 - In Ralph Hexter & Brenda Schildgen (eds.), Reading the Past Across Space and Time: Receptions and World Literature. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 121-147.
    Starting from an abstract sketch of scenarios for philosophical reception stimulated by disagreement and school rivalry, part one of this chapter highlights the case of an older, marginalized position that tries to reinsert itself into the debate through radical modernization of its terminology and argumentative strategies and thereby triggers various forms of orthodox response. Part two discusses examples for this scenario extracted from some of the remains of the Peripatetic ethical literature of the late Hellenistic era (Critolaus, Arius Didymus). Challenging (...)
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  10. Nature, Normativity, and Nomos in Antiphon, Fr. 44.David Riesbeck - 2011 - Phoenix 65 (3/4):268-287.
  11. Hellenistic Cosmopolitanism.Eric Brown - 2006 - In Mary Louise Gill & Pierre Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Oxford, UK: pp. 549-558.
    This chapter surveys the origins and development in Greek philosophy of the thought that living well requires living as a citizen of the world.
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  12. Medicinanalogin i antik etik.Frits Gåvertsson - 2016 - Filosofisk Tidskrift 37 (2):35-42.
    Hellenistisk moralfilosofi utmärks av en syn på filosofisk verksamhet som är både praktisk och medkännande, en filosofi som var ämnad att hjälpa människor i deras lidande och med deras mest pressande bryderier. Man såg filosofin som ett verktyg för att handskas med problem vi människor mer eller mindre dagligen ställs inför såsom dödsångest, kärlek, och aggressioner. Utan att göra avkall på sanningssökande betraktade man filosofin som ämnad att hjälpa människor att leva blomstrande, lyckliga, liv. Denna moralfilosofiska ansats, eudaimonismen, kan sammanfattas (...)
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  13. ‘Review of R. Kamtekar (Ed.) (2012) Virtue and Happiness: Essays in Honour of Julia Annas. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Supplementary Volume’. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2013.7.37. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2013 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 7:37.
  14. ‘Review of K. Lampe (2015) The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life (Princeton University Press)’. Classical Journal 2015.09.02. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2015 - Classical Journal 9:02.
  15. ‘Review of A. Dressler (2016) Personification and the Feminine in Roman Philosophy (Cambridge University Press)’. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2017.03.48. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2017 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 3:48.
  16. ‘Review of M. Bonazzi and S. Schorn (Eds.) (2016) Bios Philosophos: Philosophy in Ancient Greek Biography (Brepols)’. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2017 - Classical Journal 2017:09.05.
  17. Plutarch and Augustine on the Battlestar Galactica: Rediscovering Our Need for Virtue and Grace Through Modern Fiction.Mark J. Boone - 2013 - Imaginatio Et Ratio: A Journal for Theology and the Arts 2 (1).
    Two ancient sages show how even the most salacious fiction can be spiritually beneficial, for it shows our need for virtue and for grace. The first is the Roman philosopher Plutarch. Among ancient moral philosophers who were concerned with the effects of bad behavior in fiction, Plutarch distinguishes himself by showing how we can benefit morally from such stories. To do so we must approach them with a critical mind and from the right perspective; only then will we have the (...)
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  18. Ancient Greek Ethics.Wolfsdorf David (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
  19. "Fear of Diversity: The Birth of Political Science in Ancient Greek Thought", by Arlene W. Saxonhouse. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):436.
  20. Individual and Conflict in Greek Ethics, by Nicholas White.Nicholas D. Smith - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):215.
  21. A. M. Batteggazzore, F. Decleva Caizzi. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (2):526-527.
  22. Greek Ethical Thought From Homer to the Stoics. By Hilda D. Oakeley, M.A., Oxon., Reader in Philosophy in King's College, University of London. Pp. Xxxviii + 226. London and Toronto: J. M. Dent and Sons, Ltd., 1925. (The Library of Greek Thought.). [REVIEW]R. B. Onians - 1926 - The Classical Review 40 (4):122-123.
  23. Beschouwigen Naar Aanleiding van Het Ontbreken van Ons Ethisch Wilsbegrip in de Oud-Griekse Ethiek. [REVIEW]H. J. Rose - 1960 - The Classical Review 10 (3):258-259.
  24. Virtue and Knowledge: An Introduction to Ancient Greek Ethics. [REVIEW]A. W. Price - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (2):499-500.
  25. Emotion in the Greek Philosophers. [REVIEW]M. R. Wright - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (2):241-242.
  26. Greek Popular Morality. [REVIEW]John Gould - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (2):285-287.
  27. Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (2):332-336.
  28. The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics. [REVIEW]C. C. W. Taylor - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (2):325-327.
  29. The Golden Age of Virtue: Aristotle’s Ethics. [REVIEW]Georgios Anagnostopoulos - 1996 - Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):228-233.
  30. Akrasia in Greek Philosophy: From Socrates to Plotinus. [REVIEW]A. W. Price - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):486-490.
  31. The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks: Studies in Aristotle and Greek Literature. [REVIEW]Sophie Rietti - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):447-452.
  32. The Human Animal: The Natural and the Rational in Aristotle’s Anthropology.Adriel Trott - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):269-285.
    I argue that the human being fits squarely within the natural world in Aristotle’s anthropology. Like other natural beings, we strive to fulfill our end from the potential within us to achieve that end. Logos does not make human beings unnatural but makes us responsible for our actualization. As rational, the human can never be reduced to mere living animal but is always already concerned with living well; yet, as natural, she is not separated from the animal world, a dangerous (...)
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  33. Etiche antiche, etiche moderne. Temi di discussione.Stefano Bacin (ed.) - 2010 - Il Mulino.
    The volume contains 10 chapters on 5 main issues of philosophical ethics: Relative/Absolute, Natural/Normative, Value/Values, Reason/Passions, Commands/Counsels. Each issue is examined in two chapters, the first one dealing with ancient (or medieval) philosophical positions, and the second one dealing with modern or contemporary debates.
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  34. Quarundam Rerum Initia in Nostra Potestate Sunt.Stefano Maso - 2013 - In Stefano Maso Francesca Masi (ed.), Fate, Chance, and Fortune in Ancient Thought. pp. 125-144.
    Does the Stoic school really, accepting fate, reject free will? It would seem so, mainly if we read the evidences of Zeno or Chrysippus. The Stoic Senecais central to this particular theoretical inquiry, which hinges on the concepts of causality, of determinism and responsibility.
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  35. Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire.Teresa Morgan - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Morality is one of the fundamental structures of any society, enabling complex groups to form, negotiate their internal differences and persist through time. In the first book-length study of Roman popular morality, Dr Morgan argues that we can recover much of the moral thinking of people across the Empire. Her study draws on proverbs, fables, exemplary stories and gnomic quotations, to explore how morality worked as a system for Roman society as a whole and in individual lives. She examines the (...)
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  36. The Quest for the Good Life: Ancient Philosophers on Happiness. Edited by Øyvind Rabbås, Eyjólfur K. Emilsson, Hallvard Fossheim, and Miira Tuominen. [REVIEW]Riin Sirkel - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (619).
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  37. The Norms of Nature: Studies in Hellenistic Ethics.Malcolm Schofield & Gisela Striker (eds.) - 1986 - Cambridge University Press.
    Can moral philosophy alter our moral beliefs or our emotions? Does moral scepticism mean making up our own values, or does it leave us without moral commitments at all? Is it possible to find a basis for ethics in human nature? These are some of the main questions explored in this volume, which is devoted to the ethics of the Hellenistic schools of philosophy. Some of the leading scholars in the field have here taken a look at the bases of (...)
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  38. Epicurean Wills, Empty Hopes, and the Problem of Post Mortem Concern.Bill Wringe - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):289-315.
    Many Epicurean arguments for the claim that death is nothing to us depend on the ‘Experience Constraint’: the claim that something can only be good or bad for us if we experience it. However, Epicurus’ commitment to the Experience Constraint makes his attitude to will-writing puzzling. How can someone who accepts the Experience Constraint be motivated to bring about post mortem outcomes?We might think that an Epicurean will-writer could be pleased by the thought of his/her loved ones being provided for (...)
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  39. The Greek Polis and Justice.Martin A. Bertman - 1980 - Apeiron 14 (2):134 - 138.
  40. Tonneau percé, tonneau habité - Calliclès et Diogène : les leçons rivales de la nature.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2015 - Philosophie Antique 15:149-178.
    Comme de nombreux penseurs antiques avant et après eux et contrairement à Socrate, Calliclès et Diogène ont déclaré avoir fondé leur éthique sur l’observation de la nature. Et pourtant, les deux discours normatifs qui sont tirés d’une nature que l’on pourrait a priori croire être la même sont on ne peut plus opposés. Calliclès croit que l’homme est appelé à dominer autrui ; Diogène pense plutôt qu’il doit se dominer lui-même ; le premier est un hédoniste débridé, le second croit (...)
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  41. The Greeks and Us: Essays in Honor of Arthur W. H. Adkins.Robert B. Louden & Paul Schollmeier (eds.) - 1996 - University of Chicago Press.
    Arthur W. H. Adkins's writings have sparked debates among a wide range of scholars over the nature of ancient Greek ethics and its relevance to modern times. Demonstrating the breadth of his influence, the essays in this volume reveal how leading classicists, philosophers, legal theorists, and scholars of religion have incorporated Adkins's thought into their own diverse research. The timely subjects addressed by the contributors include the relation between literature and moral understanding, moral and nonmoral values, and the contemporary meaning (...)
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  42. Ethics.Stephen Everson (ed.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This fourth Companion to Ancient Thought is devoted to ancient ethics. The chapters range over the ethical theories of all the major philosophers and schools from the earliest times to the work of the Hellenistic philosophers. There is a substantial introduction which considers the question of what is distinctive about ancient ethics, and an extensive bibliography. This collection provides a sophisticated and accessible introduction to the moral theories of the ancient world.
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  43. Pleasure in Ancient Greek Philosophy.David Wolfsdorf - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Key Themes in Ancient Philosophy series provides concise books, written by major scholars and accessible to non-specialists, on important themes in ancient philosophy that remain of philosophical interest today. In this volume Professor Wolfsdorf undertakes the first exploration of ancient Greek philosophical conceptions of pleasure in relation to contemporary conceptions. He provides broad coverage of the ancient material, from pre-Platonic to Old Stoic treatments; and, in the contemporary period, from World War II to the present. Examination of the nature (...)
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  44. Christoph Horn, L'arte della vita nell'antichità (Roma: Carocci, 2004). [REVIEW]Lorenzo Greco - 2006 - Rivista di Filosofia 97 (2):317-18.
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  45. Ancient Ethics.J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  46. Durable Goods: Pleasure, Wealth and Power in the Virtuous Life . By Gerol Petruzella. Pp. 173, New York, NY, Peter Lang, 2013, $76.95. [REVIEW]John R. Williams - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (5):859-560.
  47. Aristotle on Friendship. [REVIEW]S. M. D. - 1941 - Journal of Philosophy 38 (10):275-276.
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  48. Perception, Sensibility, and Moral Motivation in Augustine: A Stoic-Platonic Synthesis.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2013 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    This book argues that Augustine assimilated the Stoic theory of perception and mental language (lekta/dicibilia), and that this epistemology underlies his accounts of motivation, affectivity, therapy for the passions, and moral progress. Byers elucidates seminal passages which have long puzzled commentators, such as Confessions 8, City of God 9 and 14, Replies to Simplicianus 1, and obscure sections of the later ‘anti-Pelagian’ works. Tracking the Stoic terminology, Byers analyzes Augustine’s engagement with Cicero, Seneca, Ambrose, Jerome, Origen, and Philo of Alexandria, (...)
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  49. Ancient and Modern Ethics Combined.Christian J. Feldbacher - 2010 - Athens Dialogues E-Journal 1 (1).
    One challenge of societies in the 21st century is the conflict of norms between different cultures. In Ancient Greece, too, such conflicts arose, and great thinkers offered great solutions. In this contribution we will argue for the following: - Ancient ethical theories were not only individual ethical theories but also social ethical theories (II). - The ancient methods of scientific examinations are useful not only in classical sciences but also in ethics (III). - Accepting the result of (III) yields highly (...)
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  50. Friends and the Philosophy of Friendship in Horace.W. S. Maguinness - 1938
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