62 found
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  1. The wounded storyteller: body, illness, and ethics.Arthur W. Frank - 1995 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    In At the Will of the Body , Arthur Frank told the story of his own illnesses, heart attack and cancer. That book ended by describing the existence of a "remission society," whose members all live with some form of illness or disability. The Wounded Storyteller is their collective portrait. Ill people are more than victims of disease or patients of medicine they are wounded storytellers. People tell stories to make sense of their suffering when they turn their diseases into (...)
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  2.  39
    Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness and the Body.S. Kay Toombs, Lisa Sowle Cahill, Margaret A. Farley, Paul A. Komesaroff, Arthur W. Frank & Lennard J. Davis - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (5):39.
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  3.  50
    The renewal of generosity: illness, medicine, and how to live.Arthur W. Frank - 2004 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Contemporary health care often lacks generosity of spirit, even when treatment is most efficient. Too many patients are left unhappy with how they are treated, and too many medical professionals feel estranged from the calling that drew them to medicine. Arthur W. Frank tells the stories of ill people, doctors, and nurses who are restoring generosity to medicine--generosity toward others and to themselves. The Renewal of Generosity evokes medicine as the face-to-face encounter that comes before and after diagnostics, pharmaceuticals, and (...)
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  4.  79
    Bringing Bodies Back in: A Decade Review.Arthur W. Frank - 1990 - Theory, Culture and Society 7 (1):131-162.
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  5.  22
    Narrative Ethics as Dialogical Story‐Telling.Arthur W. Frank - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s1):16-20.
    The narrative ethicist imagines life as multiple points of view, each reflecting a distinct imagination and each more or less capable of comprehending other points of view and how they imagine. Each point of view is constantly being acted out and then modified in response to how others respond. People generally have good intentions, but they get stuck realizing those intentions. Stories stall when dialogue breaks down. People stop hearing others' stories, maybe because those others have quit telling their stories. (...)
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  6.  80
    Bioethics and the Later Foucault.Arthur W. Frank & Therese Jones - 2003 - Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (3/4):179-186.
  7.  57
    Emily's Scars: Surgical Shapings, Technoluxe, and Bioethics.Arthur W. Frank - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (2):18-29.
    Increasingly, medicine is used to remodel, revise, and revamp as much as to heal and mend. It is tempting to say that people make merely personal choices about these new uses. But such choices have implications for everybody, and they ought to be made cautiously, slowly, and in a way that opens them to discussion.
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  8.  29
    Truth Telling, Companionship, and Witness: An Agenda for Narrative Ethics.Arthur W. Frank - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):17-21.
    Narrative ethics holds that if you ask someone what goodness is, as a basis of action, most people will first appeal to various abstractions, each of which can be defined only by other abstractions that in turn require further definition. If you persist in asking what each of these abstractions actually means, eventually that person will have to tell you a story and expect you to recognize goodness in the story. Goodness and badness need stories to make them thinkable and (...)
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  9.  39
    Enacting illness stories: When, what, and why.Arthur W. Frank - 1997 - In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Stories and Their Limits: Narrative Approaches to Bioethics. Routledge. pp. 31--49.
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  10.  23
    First‐Person Microethics.Arthur W. Frank - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (4):37-42.
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  11.  14
    Not Whether_ but _How: Considerations on the Ethics of Telling Patients’ Stories.Arthur W. Frank - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (6):13-16.
    The ethics of telling stories about other people become questionable as soon as humans learn to talk. But the stakes get higher when health care professionals tell stories about those whom they serve. But for all the problems that come with such stories, I do not believe it is either practical or desirable for bioethicists to attempt to legislate an end to this storytelling. What we need instead is narrative nuance. We need to understand how to tell respectful stories in (...)
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  12.  31
    Dense Junctures of Ethical Concern.Arthur W. Frank - 2013 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (1):35-40.
    A collection of stories by bioethicists writing about their own illnesses displays the importance of microethics. From this perspective, ethics happens not in the application of principles to specific decisions, but rather in the moment-to-moment flow of clinical interaction, as healthcare workers and patients make decisions, especially in their use of language. Microethical issues that are common to multiple stories are described as dense junctures of ethical concern. Three junctures are discussed in detail: conflicts between medical and patient rationalities, issues (...)
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  13.  8
    A Medical Pedagogy of Mutual Suffering.Arthur W. Frank - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (5):42-43.
    Who's afflicted? Early in Nicole Piemonte's book Afflicted: How Vulnerability Can Heal Medical Education and Practice, she quotes an email from a physician whose voice sets the problem and tone. He describes himself as someone “who has intended well” but then “nearly burned out because of the insidious process of physician formation that left me a mess at the threshold of the suffering of other human beings.” His confessional manifesto regrets “the sad things I have seen and done.” His narrative (...)
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  14.  32
    What Is Narrative Therapy and How Can It Help Health Humanities?Arthur W. Frank - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (4):553-563.
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  15.  12
    First-Person Microethics Deriving Principles from belowLife As We Know It: A Father, a Family, and an Exceptional ChildWaist-High in the World: A Life among the NondisabledTime on Fire: My Comedy of TerrorsSigns of Life: A Memoir of Dying and Discovery.Arthur W. Frank, Michael Bérubé, Nancy Mairs, Evan Handler, Tim Brookes & Michael Berube - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (4):37.
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  16.  13
    “How Can They Act Like That?”: Clinicians and Patients as Characters in Each Other's Stories.Arthur W. Frank - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (6):14-22.
    When clinician‐patient relationships go wrong, the problem may not be merely that one person is knowingly mistreating the other. More likely, they are caught up in different stories, and animated by different moral visions. The task is for each to see the point of the other's story.
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  17.  22
    Experiencing illness through storytelling.Arthur W. Frank - 2001 - In Kay Toombs (ed.), Handbook of Phenomenology and Medicine. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 229--245.
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  18. Narrative ethics as dialogical storytelling.Arthur W. Frank - 2014 - In Martha Montello (ed.), Narrative ethics: the role of stories in bioethics. John Wiley and Sons.
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  19.  11
    Only by Daylight: Habermas's Postmodern Modernism.Arthur W. Frank - 1992 - Theory, Culture and Society 9 (3):149-165.
  20. Biovaluable stories and a narrative ethics of reconfigurable bodies.Arthur W. Frank - 2013 - In Michael J. Hyde & James A. Herrick (eds.), After the genome: a language for our biotechnological future. Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press.
     
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  21.  20
    Anxiety Aroused By the Dying: a Phenomenological Inquiry.Arthur W. Frank - 1978 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 9 (1):99-113.
  22.  14
    Ann Jurecic’s Illness as Narrative: Book Review.Arthur W. Frank - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (1):77-79.
  23.  28
    Bioethics and “Rightness”.Arthur W. Frank - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (2):page inside back cover-page insi.
    If bioethics seeks to affect what people do and don't do as they respond to the practical issues that confront them, then it is useful to take seriously people's sense of rightness. Rightness emerges from the fabric of a life—including the economy of its geography, the events of its times, its popular culture—to be what the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu calls a predisposition. It is the product of a way of life and presupposes continuing to live that way. Rightness is local (...)
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  24.  16
    Bioethics' Contradiction: Everyday Ethics and the Morality System.Arthur W. Frank - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (2):283-292.
    In one of Richard Zaner’s tales of ethics consultation practice, a moment occurs that might be comic, except for the gravity of the situation. Zaner goes to visit the parents of an infant with multiple problems who has been admitted to neonatal intensive care. He introduces himself awkwardly, and the child’s father responds: “‘Why,’ he bluntly asked, ‘are you here now?’ And with, again, exemplary frankness, he pointedly demanded, eyes narrowing in that knowing way, full of suspicion: ‘Has someone been (...)
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  25.  5
    Bodies, Sex and Death.Arthur W. Frank - 1998 - Theory, Culture and Society 15 (3-4):417-425.
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  26.  15
    Commentary: Being Their Worst Nightmare: On David Perusek's “Cancer, Culture, and Individual Experience”.Arthur W. Frank - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (4):512-516.
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  27.  12
    Correction to: Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity by Danielle Spencer.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):527-527.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10912-021-09698-y.
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  28.  16
    The Book of Jesse: A Story of Youth, Illness, and Medicine.Arthur W. Frank & Michael Rowe - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (1):46.
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  29.  13
    Do I Look at You with Love?: Reimagining the Story of Dementia by Mark Freeman, Leiden and Boston: Brill Sense, 2021.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):379-382.
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  30.  10
    Eating in Theory by Annemarie Mol, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2021.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):509-511.
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  31.  23
    Hilde Lindemann’s Holding and Letting Go: The Social Practice of Personal Identities.Arthur W. Frank - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (1):111-113.
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  32.  7
    Medieval Bodies and Feminist History.Arthur W. Frank - 1992 - Theory, Culture and Society 9 (4):161-168.
  33.  5
    Moral Distress in Deciding How Others Die.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 65 (1):59-72.
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  34.  8
    Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity by Danielle Spencer.Arthur W. Frank - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):499-501.
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  35.  11
    Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity by Danielle Spencer.Arthur W. Frank - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):499-501.
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  36.  7
    Making Scenes in Public: Symbolic Violence and Social Order.Arthur W. Frank - 1976 - Theory and Society 3 (3):395.
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  37.  22
    Narrative-based Practice in Health and Social Care: Conversations Inviting Change by John Launer, London and New York: Routledge, 2018.Arthur W. Frank - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (4):613-616.
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  38.  15
    Narrative Witness to Bodies: A Response to Alan Radley.Arthur W. Frank - 1997 - Body and Society 3 (3):103-109.
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  39.  4
    Stories and Shame in Front‐Line Medicine.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (6):44-45.
    This review of Jay Baruch's Tornado of Life: A Doctor's Journey through Constraints and Creativity in the ER considers the book's contributions, including its explorations of the clinical dilemma of working with patients’ stories that are fragmented, how easily clinicians can miss crucial parts of patients’ stories and how that affects care, and the “agonizing compromises” between what patients need and what institutions can provide. Baruch acknowledges, without any self‐indulgence, the shame that his work causes him, given the limitations of (...)
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  40.  12
    Suffering, Medicine, and What Is Pointless.Arthur W. Frank - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (2):352-365.
    In my ideal academy of healing arts, students of all health-care professions would spend their first semester together, thinking only about suffering. No coursework on bodies, diseases, or basic science. No socialization into distinct professional identities. Just suffering from multiple perspectives: literary, philosophical, spiritual, historical, crosscultural. They would be led to ask what forms of suffering have been responded to in which ways, when, by whom. Whose suffering has been systematically ignored, and what finally led to the recognition of that (...)
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  41.  63
    The painter and the cameraman: Boundaries in clinical relationships.Arthur W. Frank - 2002 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (3):219-232.
    The issue of boundaries in clinician–patientencounters is considered through narrativeanalysis of four clinical stories in whichboundaries crossings are a self-conscioustopic. One story is by a physician as patient,two are by physicians, and one is by apalliative care nurse. The stories arediscussed using Walter Benjamin''s distinctionbetween the painter, who maintains distance andsees the whole, and the cameraman, who usestechnology to penetrate realities and thenreassembles fragments. The essay argues thatdistance and closeness are ethical issues thatconstitute the possibility of clinicalencounters but the encounter (...)
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  42.  21
    The politics of the new positivity: A review essay of Michel foucault'sdiscipline and punish.Arthur W. Frank - 1982 - Human Studies 5 (1):61-67.
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  43.  4
    Tragic Realism: Reading Simon Critchley for Bioethics.Arthur W. Frank - 2020 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 63 (4):695-707.
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  44.  2
    The Twin Crises of Principles and Stories.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 65 (4):529-534.
    ABSTRACT:This symposium contribution argues that politicized responses to the COVID-19 pandemic mark the fracturing of the consensus that bioethics has been built upon. This consensus involved the mutual dependence of principles and stories: principles need stories to become applicable in clinical action, and stories need to reflect principles if they are to make generalized claims. Two mid-20th-century theorists, Erving Goffman and Walter Benjamin, each predicted the thinness of appeals to principles and to stories, respectively; their skepticism describes our moment. Anti–public (...)
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  45.  18
    The Theater of War: What Ancient Greek Tragedies Can Teach Us Today by Bryan Doerries, Alfred A. Knopf, 2015.Arthur W. Frank - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (2):209-210.
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  46.  13
    The Voices that Accompany Me.Arthur W. Frank - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):171-178.
    This essay begins with a metaphor describing who enters the field of humanities in medicine and healthcare and the types of work they do. The role of witness is discussed, underscoring tensions between witnessing and analyzing. The essay then turns to my own background as an example of how each professional in this field brings something distinct. I briefly describe the three basic principles of my work with narrative: the injunction to keep the stories in the foreground, the work of (...)
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  47.  16
    Virtue Ethics in Monetized Medicine.Arthur W. Frank - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (4):576-580.
    During Abraham Nussbaum's first year of medical school, he participated in a white coat ceremony and was invested, literally, with a white coat that is symbolic of entry into the medical profession. He was also given a book, an anthology of writings on medicine that Nussbaum describes as having a "wistful quality" and being "engaging but reverential" ; the dust jacket featured a Norman Rockwell painting. He later went to a second-hand bookstore and traded the anthology for Abraham Verghese's 1994 (...)
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  48.  9
    While Icarus Falls: Conditions for Pandemic Ethics.Arthur W. Frank - 2023 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (4):597-600.
    This symposium contribution presents three vignettes of resistance to COVID-19 public health measures in Alberta, Canada, where I live. These show resolutely individualistic attitudes toward health and a desire to understand the pandemic as a one-off aberration. I then suggest four ways that the work of bioethics needs to change. These begin with situating the pandemic within the context of global climate emergency and end with how a new polarization diminishes possibilities for the rational dialogue that bioethics has here-to-fore assumed (...)
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  49.  28
    What is Narrative Medicine?Arthur W. Frank - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (3):339-343.
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  50.  43
    Why I wrote... The Wounded Storyteller: a recollection of life and ethics.Arthur W. Frank - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (2):106-108.
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