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  1. An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives.Pamela Abbott - 2005 - Routledge.
    This third edition of the bestselling An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives confirms the ongoing centrality of feminist perspectives and research to the sociological enterprise and introduces students to the wide range of feminist contributions to key areas of sociological concern. This completely revised edition includes: · new chapters on sexuality and the media · additional material on race and ethnicity, disability and the body · many new international and comparative examples · the influence of theories of globalization and post-colonial (...)
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  2. REVIEW: Robert A. Aronowitz. Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. [REVIEW]Joelle M. Abi-Rached - 2011 - Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):79-82.
    “Breast cancer is all around us.” This is how Robert Aronowitz, a medical doctor, opens his timely Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. We are all familiar with the truism that “one in eight American women” will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. The pink ribbon has come to symbolize both solidarity and hope. Mammograms and “Self-Breast Examination” have become part of women’s daily routine, if not a spectre haunting their daily lives. Yet the evidence (...)
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  3. Disability & ADA: Disparate Insurance Coverage for Physical and Psychological Disabilities Does Not Violate ADA.Nicklas A. Akers - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (1):92-94.
  4. American Sign Language and End-of-Life Care: Research in the Deaf Community. [REVIEW]Barbara Allen, Nancy Meyers, John Sullivan & Melissa Sullivan - 2002 - HEC Forum 14 (3):197-208.
    We describe how a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process was used to develop a means of discussing end-of-life care needs of Deaf seniors. This process identified a variety of communication issues to be addressed in working with this special population. We overview the unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of this community and their implications for working with Deaf individuals to provide information for making informed decisions about end-of-life care, including completion of health care directives. Our research and our work with (...)
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  5. Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism.Ben Almassi - 2010 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  6. Is It Bad to Be Disabled? Adjudicating Between the Mere-Difference and the Bad-Difference Views of Disability.Vuko Andrić & Joachim Wündisch - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (3):1–16.
    This paper examines the impact of disability on wellbeing and presents arguments against the mere-difference view of disability. According to the mere-difference view, disability does not by itself make disabled people worse off on balance. Rather, if disability has a negative impact on wellbeing overall, this is only so because society is not treating disabled people the way it ought to treat them. In objection to the mere-difference view, it has been argued, roughly, that the view licenses the permissibility of (...)
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  7. Are Attempts to Have Impaired Children Justifiable?K. W. Anstey - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):286-288.
    Couples should not be allowed to select either for or against deafnessRecently, a US couple deliberately attempted to ensure the birth of a deaf child via artificial insemination.1 In opposing this action, I wish to focus on one argument they employ to support it, namely that in trying to have a deaf child, the women see themselves as no different from parents trying to have a girl. Girls can be discriminated against the same as deaf people and “black people have (...)
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  8. Neonatal Euthanasia: Why Require Parental Consent? [REVIEW]Jacob M. Appel - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):477-482.
    The Dutch rules governing neonatal euthanasia, known as the Groningen Protocol, require parental consent for severely disabled infants with poor prognoses to have their lives terminated. This paper questions whether parental consent should be dispositive in such cases, and argues that the potential suffering of the neonate or pediatric patient should be the decisive factor under such unfortunate circumstances.
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  9. Prenatally Diagnosed Foetal Malformations and Termination of Pregnancy: The Case of Lebanon.Thalia Arawi & Anwar Nassar - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (1):40-47.
    Termination of pregnancy (TOP) is offered in many countries, for foetuses prenatally diagnosed with congenital malformations that are deemed incompatible with life or that are associated with a high morbidity. In Lebanon, a middle income country where religion plays a focal role, the law prohibits any form of TOP unless it is the only means to save the mother's life. It is the contention of the authors of this article that even if the foetus is a person, if it were (...)
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  10. Recognizing Death While Affirming Life: Can End of Life Reform Uphold a Disabled Person's Interest in Continued Life?Adrienne Asch - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (6 Supplement):s31-s36.
  11. Distracted by Disability.Adrienne Asch - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):77-87.
    People with disabilities use more medical care and see health professionals more often than do those of the same age, ethnic group, or economic class who do not have impairments. An indisputable medical goal is.
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  12. Criticizing and Reforming Segregated Facilities for Persons with Disabilities.Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein & David T. Wasserman - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):157-168.
    In this paper, we critically appraise institutions for people with disabilities, from residential facilities to outpatient clinics to social organizations. While recognizing that a just and inclusive society would reject virtually all segregated institutional arrangements, we argue that in contemporary American society, some people with disabilities may have needs that at this time can best be met by institutional arrangements. We propose ways of reforming institutions to make them less isolating, coercive, and stigmatizing, and to provide forms of social support (...)
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  13. Medical Aspects of the Minimally Conscious State in Children.Stephen Ashwal - 2003 - Brain and Development 25 (8):535-545.
  14. Self-Awareness After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury.Laura J. Bach & Anthony S. David - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):397-414.
  15. Assisted Suicide.Karen F. Balkin & Robert D. Lane - 2005 - Greenhaven Press.
    Contributors explore the social, medical, and ethical dilemma of assisted suicide in this revised edition that includes international as well as domestic viewpoints. The federal government's continued challenges to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, the disabled community's response to assisted suicide, and the slippery slope argument are all examined.
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  16. Direct Payments and Their Future: An Ethical Concern?Colin Barnes - 2007 - Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):348-354.
    Recent policy developments in the general area of disability have presented a whole range of ethical dilemmas for everyone involved in the development and delivery of services for disabled people at the national and local levels. This is almost certainly due to government acceptance of the principles of independent living and the social model of disability, and greater user involvement and control of support services, in particular ?direct payments?. This paper will centre on the ethical concerns that arise from recent (...)
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  17. The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability.Elizabeth Barnes - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
    Disability is primarily a social phenomenon -- a way of being a minority, a way of facing social oppression, but not a way of being inherently or intrinsically worse off. This is how disability is understood in the Disability Rights and Disability Pride movements; but there is a massive disconnect with the way disability is typically viewed within analytic philosophy. The idea that disability is not inherently bad or sub-optimal is one that many philosophers treat with open skepticism, and sometimes (...)
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  18. Disability, Minority, and Difference.Elizabeth Barnes - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):337-355.
    abstract In this paper I develop a characterization of disability according to which disability is in no way a sub-optimal feature. I argue, however, that this conception of disability is compatible with the idea that having a disability is, at least in a restricted sense, a harm. I then go on to argue that construing disability in this way avoids many of the common objections levelled at accounts which claim that disability is not a negative feature.
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  19. Education, Religion and Society: Essays in Honour of John M. Hull.Dennis Bates, Gloria Durka, Friedrich Schweitzer & John M. Hull (eds.) - 2006 - Routledge.
    Education, Religion and Society celebrates the career of Professor John Hull of the University of Birmingham, UK, the internationally renowned religious educationist who has also achieved worldwide fame for his brilliant writings on his experience, mid-career, of total blindness. In his outstanding career he has been a leading figure in the transformation of religious education in English and Welsh state schools from Christian instruction to multi-faith religious education and was the co-founder of the International Seminar on Religious Education and values. (...)
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  20. Amputees by Choice: Body Integrity Identity Disorder and the Ethics of Amputation.Tim Bayne & Neil Levy - 2005 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):75–86.
    In 1997, a Scottish surgeon by the name of Robert Smith was approached by a man with an unusual request: he wanted his apparently healthy lower left leg amputated. Although details about the case are sketchy, the would-be amputee appears to have desired the amputation on the grounds that his left foot wasn’t part of him – it felt alien. After consultation with psychiatrists, Smith performed the amputation. Two and a half years later, the patient reported that his life had (...)
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  21. Love and Space in the Nursing Home.Karen Bermann - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (6):511-523.
    Nursing homes and other institutionsdesigned for persons with impairments are not,in fact, designed for persons with impairments.They are typically designed for theimpairments, not the persons, and therebybecome a part of the problem by reinforcingphysical and cultural manifestations of theimpairments. In the essay that follows, Idescribe an architectural design project inwhich students were asked to make changes to anexisting nursing home for the persons who livedthere. This requires not only becoming familiarwith the spaces, but with the personsthemselves and designing space to (...)
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  22. Immobility and the Self: A Clinical-Existential Inquiry.Ellen W. Bernal - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):75-92.
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  23. Locked-In: Don't Judge a Book by its Cover.J. L. Bernheim - unknown
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; also called motor neuron disease) is a devastating medical condition that progressively robs patients of their ability to move, speak and eventually breathe. At present, many physicians are hesitant to propose tracheostomy and respiratory support in the terminal phase of ALS. In accordance with the principle of patient autonomy, physicians should respect the right of the ALS patient to accept or refuse any treatment, including mechanical ventilation. Also, in environments where euthanasia or physician-assisted death is legal, (...)
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  24. Severe Brain Injury and the Subjective Life.J. Andrew Billings, Larry R. Churchill & Richard Payne - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (3):17-21.
  25. What is Wrong with Eliminating Genetically Based Disability?B. Brecher - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):218-225.
    An argument often made against the genetic elimination of disability is that to prevent people with a particular genetic make-up being born is to disvalue, or even threaten, those people who actually have it. The thought is that the view that the world would be a better place without, say, Huntingdon’s Chorea, must imply that the world would be a better place without those people who currently have it. In opposition to this objection to the elimination of genetically based conditions, (...)
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  26. Health Care Resource Prioritization and Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities.Dan W. Brock - unknown
    In 1990 the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became federal law with the express purpose to “establish a clear and comprehensive national mandate for the elimination of discrimination against individuals with disabilities."l The act includes separate titles prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, public services, transportation and public accommodations. Since it prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in both public and private services and programs, in health care “it applies to programs provided by the government, (...)
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  27. Cost-Effectiveness and Disability Discrimination.Dan W. Brock - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):27-47.
    It is widely recognized that prioritizing health care resources by their relative cost-effectiveness can result in lower priority for the treatment of disabled persons than otherwise similar non-disabled persons. I distinguish six different ways in which this discrimination against the disabled can occur. I then spell out and evaluate the following moral objections to this discrimination, most of which capture an aspect of its unethical character: it implies that disabled persons' lives are of lesser value than those of non-disabled persons; (...)
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  28. The Non-Identity Problem and Genetic Harms – the Case of Wrongful Handicaps.Dan W. Brock - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):269–275.
    The Human Genome Project will produce information permitting increasing opportunities to prevent genetically transmitted harms, most of which will be compatible with a life worth living, through avoiding conception or terminating a pregnancy. Failure to prevent these harms when it is possible for parents to do so without substantial burdens or costs to themselves or others are what J call “wrongful handicaps”. Derek Parfit has developed a systematic difficulty for any such cases being wrongs — when the harm could be (...)
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  29. Solidarity in Perinatal Medicine.B. Cadore, P. Boitte, G. Demuijnck, D. Greiner & D. Jacquemin - 2000 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (4):435-454.
    In this paper it is argued that questions in perinatal medicine concerning treatment or non-treatment of severely handicapped children, after or before birth, cannot be answered solely by referring to the general aims and objectives of medical treatment and its specific deontology. Justifications of decisions about treatment and non-treatment need to be placed in a broader context of discussions about social justice and the social significance of medical practice as a whole.
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  30. Review of Elizabeth Barnes, The Minority Body. [REVIEW]Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  31. Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity.Jonathan Cole - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome. People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed after spinal cord injury struggle to have others (...)
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  32. Social Liberty and the Physically Disabled.Phillip Cole - 1987 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):29-39.
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  33. Commentary on Rebecca Schwartz-Mette's 2009 Article, “Challenges in Addressing Graduate Student Impairment in Academic Professional Psychology Programs”.Christopher Collins, Carol A. Falender & Edward P. Shafranske - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (5):428 - 430.
    Ethics & Behavior, Volume 21, Issue 5, Page 428-430, September-October 2011.
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  34. Section 504, Handicapped Newborns, and Ethics Committees: An Alternative to the Hotline.A. Edward Doudera - 1983 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 11 (5):200-202.
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  35. Attenuated Thoughts.Alice Dreger - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (6):3-3.
    I was invited to join the Seattle Growth Attenuation and Ethics Working Group—collective author of the lead article in this issue of the Report—but I begged off, claiming I had too many other things on my plate. True, but the bigger reason for avoiding the project was my suspicion that I would be torn asunder by the complexity of growth attenuation for persons with disabilities. Reading the essays from the group reveals that instinct to have been dead-on. As a person (...)
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  36. The Anomalous Wellbeing of Disabled People: A Response.Claire Edwards - 2013 - Topoi 32 (2):189-196.
    Disabled people frequently find themselves in situations where their quality of life and wellbeing is being measured or judged by others, whether in decisions about health care provision or assessments for social supports. Recent debates about wellbeing and how it might be assessed (through subjective and/or objective measures) have prompted a renewed focus on disabled people’s wellbeing because of its seemingly ‘anomalous’ nature; that is, whilst to external (objective) observers the wellbeing of disabled people appears poor, based on subjective assessments, (...)
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  37. The Body as Object Versus the Body as Subject: The Case of Disability.Steven D. Edwards - 1998 - Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (1):47-56.
    This paper is prompted by the charge that the prevailing Western paradigm of medical knowledge is essentially Cartesian. Hence, illness, disease, disability, etc. are said to be conceived of in Cartesian terms. The paper attempts to make use of the critique of Cartesianism in medicine developed by certain commentators, notably Leder (1992), in order to expose Cartesian commitments in conceptions of disability. The paper also attempts to sketch an alternative conception of disability — one partly inspired by the work of (...)
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  38. State Legislation and the Handicapped Newborn: A Moral and Political Dilemma.Eric Feldman & Thomas H. Murray - 1984 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 12 (4):156-163.
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  39. Toward Operational Architectonics of Consciousness: Basic Evidence From Patients with Severe Cerebral Injuries.Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni & Giuseppe Galardi - 2012 - Cognitive Processing 13 (2):111-131.
    Although several studies propose that the integrity of neuronal assemblies may underlie a phenomenon referred to as awareness, none of the known studies have explicitly investigated dynamics and functional interactions among neuronal assemblies as a function of consciousness expression. In order to address this question EEG operational architectonics analysis (Fingelkurts and Fingelkurts, 2001, 2008) was conducted in patients in minimally conscious (MCS) and vegetative states (VS) to study the dynamics of neuronal assemblies and operational synchrony among them as a function (...)
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  40. Neuroethics and Neuroimaging: Moving Toward Transparency.Joseph J. Fins - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):46 – 52.
    Without exaggeration, it could be said that we are entering a golden age of neuroscience. Informed by recent developments in neuroimaging that allow us to peer into the working brain at both a structural and functional level, neuroscientists are beginning to untangle mechanisms of recovery after brain injury and grapple with age-old questions about brain and mind and their correlates neural mechanisms and consciousness. Neuroimaging, coupled with new diagnostic categories and assessment scales are helping us develop a new diagnostic nosology (...)
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  41. Practical Wisdom in Caring for Children with a Disability in the Czech Republic.Hana Francova & Ales Novotny - 2010 - Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (1):24-43.
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  42. The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics.Arthur W. Frank - 1995 - University of Chicago Press.
    In At the Will of the Body , Arthur Frank told the story of his own illnesses, heart attack and cancer. That book ended by describing the existence of a "remission society," whose members all live with some form of illness or disability. The Wounded Storyteller is their collective portrait. Ill people are more than victims of disease or patients of medicine they are wounded storytellers. People tell stories to make sense of their suffering when they turn their diseases into (...)
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  43. Modularity in Developmental Disorders: Evidence From Specific Language Impairment and Peripheral Dyslexias.Naama Friedmann & Aviah Gvion - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):756-757.
    Evidence from various subtypes of Specific Language Impairment and developmental peripheral dyslexias is presented to support the idea that even developmental disorders can be modular. However, in developmental letter position dyslexia and neglect dyslexia we show that additional errors can occur because of insufficient orthographic-lexical knowledge.
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  44. Nativism, Neuroconstructivism, and Developmental Disorder.Philip Gerrans - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):757-758.
    Either genetically specified modular cognitive architecture for syntactic processing does not exist (neuroconstructivism), or there is a module but its development is so abnormal in Williams syndrome (WS) that no conclusion can be drawn about its normal architecture (moderate nativism). Radical nativism, which holds that WS is a case of intact syntax, is untenable. Specific Language Impairment and WS create a dilemma that radical nativism cannot accommodate.
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  45. Self-Regulated Dependency: Ethical Reflections on Interdependence and Help in Adapted Physical Activity.Donna L. Goodwin - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):172 – 184.
    This article explores the ethical implications of the goal of functional independence for persons with disabilities. Central to independence is protection against the fear and uncertainty of future dependency and assurance of a level of social status. Moreover, independence reflects individualism, autonomy and control of decisions about one's life. Dependency, in contrast, implies the inability to do things for oneself and reliance on others to assist with tasks of everyday life. The ethics of independence are explored within the context of (...)
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  46. The Rise of Fibromyalgia in 20th-Century America.Gerald N. Grob - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):417-437.
    At the beginning of the 21st century, fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) has become a diagnostic category that includes extremely large numbers of people, predominantly women. Estimates that perhaps 2 to 4% of the adult population suffer from FM have been widely accepted. Moreover, patients diagnosed with FM have incurred substantial medical costs, to say nothing about high rates of disability. Yet the diagnosis has remained highly contested, and there are competing etiological theories and therapies. Indeed, a leading authority has identified what (...)
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  47. The Great Apes and the Severely Disabled: Moral Status and Thick Evaluative Concepts.Logi Gunnarsson - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):305-326.
    The literature of bioethics suffers from two serious problems. (1) Most authors are unable to take seriously both the rights of the great apes and of severely disabled human infants. Rationalism—moral status rests on rational capacities—wrongly assigns a higher moral status to the great apes than to all severely disabled human infants with less rational capacities than the great apes. Anthropocentrism—moral status depends on membership in the human species—falsely grants all humans a higher moral status than the great apes. Animalism—moral (...)
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  48. Choosing Disability, Visualizing Care.Adams Rachel - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):301-321.
    This article explores how visual images of dependency and care reflect and reinforce perceptions of people who are ill, disabled, or otherwise dependent, those who sustain them, and the meaning of the work they do. Scenes of care are a valuable index for understanding cultural assumptions about who is deserving of care, how and where care should be given, and who is obligated to serve as a giver of care. It positions these images in the context of the emphasis, within (...)
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