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David Bronstein [16]David M. Bronstein [1]
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David Bronstein
Georgetown University
  1. Aristotle on Knowledge and Learning: The Posterior Analytics.David Bronstein - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David Bronstein sheds new light on Aristotle's Posterior Analytics--one of the most important, and difficult, works in the history of western philosophy--by arguing that it is coherently structured around two themes of enduring philosophical interest: knowledge and learning. He argues that the Posterior Analytics is a sustained examination of scientific knowledge, an elegantly organized work in which Aristotle describes the mind's ascent from sense-perception of particulars to scientific knowledge of first principles. Bronstein goes on to highlight Plato's influence on Aristotle's (...)
     
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  2.  33
    Essence, Necessity, and Demonstration in Aristotle.David Bronstein - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (3):724-732.
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  3. The Origin and Aim of Posterior Analytics II.19.David Bronstein - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (1):29-62.
    Abstract In Posterior Analytics II.19 Aristotle raises and answers the question, how do first principles become known? The usual view is that the question asks about the process or method by which we learn principles and that his answer is induction. I argue that the question asks about the original prior knowledge from which principles become known and that his answer is perception. Hence the aim of II.19 is not to explain how we get all the way to principles but (...)
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    Aristotle’s Critique of Plato’s Theory of Innate Knowledge.David Bronstein - 2016 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 19 (1):126-139.
    In Posterior Analytics 2.19, Aristotle argues that we cannot have innate knowledge of first principles because if we did we would have the most precise items of knowledge without noticing, which is impossible. To understand Aristotle’s argument we need to understand why he thinks we cannot possess these items of knowledge without noticing. In this paper, I present three different answers to this question and three different readings of his argument corresponding to them. The first two readings focus on the (...)
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  5. Meno's Paradox in Posterior Analytics 1.1.David Bronstein - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 38:115 - 141.
  6.  92
    Episteme, Demonstration, and Explanation: A Fresh Look at Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics. [REVIEW]Gregory Salmieri, David Bronstein, David Charles & James G. Lennox - 2014 - Metascience 23 (1):1-35.
  7.  32
    Comments on Gregory Salmieri,'Aisthêsis, Empeiria, and the Advent of Universals in Posterior Analytics II 19'.David Bronstein - 2010 - Apeiron 43 (2-3):187-194.
  8. Aristotle on Predication and Demonstration.David Bronstein - 2019 - Manuscrito 42 (4):85-121.
    I argue against the standard interpretation of Aristotle’s account of ‘natural predication’ in Posterior Analytics 1.19 and 1.22 according to which only substances can serve as subjects in such predications. I argue that this interpretation cannot accommodate a number of demonstrations Aristotle sanctions. I propose a new interpretation that can accommodate them.
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  9. Hegel and the Holocaust.David Bronstein - 2005 - Animus 10:53-62.
  10.  15
    Investigação e Paradoxo do Mênon: Aristóteles, Segundos Analíticos II 8.David Bronstein - 2010 - Dois Pontos 7 (3).
    This paper discusses some issues about Aristotle’s theory of scientific investigation in Posterior Analytics II 8. Aristotle says that scientific investigation comes in three stages. My point is that Aristotle’s theory of scientific investigation cannot avoid Meno’s paradox – the paradox about the impossibility of whatsoever sort of investigation – unless its second stage, the stage in which one establishes that an object exists, is understood in terms of establishing that the object is a legitimate explanandum in the domain of (...)
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  11.  31
    Is Plato an Innatist in the Meno?David Bronstein & Whitney Schwab - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):392-430.
    Plato in the Meno is standardly interpreted as committed to condition innatism: human beings are born with latent innate states of knowledge. Against this view, Gail Fine has argued for prenatalism: human souls possess knowledge in a disembodied state but lose it upon being embodied. We argue against both views and in favor of content innatism: human beings are born with innate cognitive contents that can be, but do not exist innately in the soul as, the contents of states of (...)
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  12. Paolo C. Biondi, Aristotle, Posterior Analytics II. 19: Introduction, Greek Text, Translation and Commentary Accompanied by a Critical Analysis Reviewed By. [REVIEW]David Bronstein - 2005 - Philosophy in Review 25 (3):168-170.
     
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  13.  1
    The Soul and Its Instrumental Body: A Reinterpretation of Aristotle’s Philosophy of Living Nature. By A.P. Bos. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2003. Pp. X + 429. $113. ISBN 9004130160. [REVIEW]David Bronstein - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):422-427.
  14.  26
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno’s Paradox From Socrates to Sextus, by Gail Fine.David Bronstein - 2017 - Mind 126 (502):631-634.
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno’s Paradox from Socrates to Sextus, by Gail Fine. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. xiv + 399.
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    The Soul and Its Instrumental Body: A Reinterpretation of Aristotle’s Philosophy of Living Nature, by A.P. Bos. [REVIEW]David Bronstein - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):422-427.
  16.  13
    Effect of Noise on Priming in a Lexical Decision Task.Murray Singer, David M. Bronstein & Jaye M. Miles - 1981 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (4):187-190.