Results for 'Joanne McCloskey Dochterman'

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  1. Current Issues in Nursing.Joanne McCloskey Dochterman & Helen K. Grace (eds.) - 1990 - Mosby.
     
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  2.  30
    Kant's Kingdom of Ends: Mary A. McCloskey.Mary A. Mccloskey - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (198):391-399.
    There are many uses of the word ‘ought’, not all of which are moral uses. The following sentences contain ‘oughts’ which are not moral ‘oughts’. The peaches on the tree nearest the house ought to be ripe. The old car ought to go now it's had a re-bore. You ought to prune your Lorraine Lee roses in February. You ought to wash your hands before meals. You ought to take more exercise.
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  3.  22
    Liberalism: H. J. McCloskey.H. J. Mccloskey - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (187):13-32.
    Liberalism is commonly believed, especially by its exponents, to be opposed to interference by way of enforcing value judgments or concerning itself with the individual's morality. My concern is to show that this is not so and that liberalism is all the better for this. Many elements have contributed to liberal thought as we know it today, the major elements being the liberalism of which Locke is the most celebrated exponent, which is based upon a belief in natural, human rights; (...)
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  4.  37
    Minds.Mary A. Mccloskey - 1962 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):303-312.
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  5. The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    For a century and a half, the artists and intellectuals of Europe have scorned the bourgeoisie. And for a millennium and a half, the philosophers and theologians of Europe have scorned the marketplace. The bourgeois life, capitalism, Mencken’s “booboisie” and David Brooks’s “bobos”—all have been, and still are, framed as being responsible for everything from financial to moral poverty, world wars, and spiritual desuetude. Countering these centuries of assumptions and unexamined thinking is Deirdre McCloskey’s _The Bourgeois Virtues_, a magnum (...)
     
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  6. Bourgeois Dignity: Why Economics Can't Explain the Modern World.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    The big economic story of our times is not the Great Recession. It is how China and India began to embrace neoliberal ideas of economics and attributed a sense of dignity and liberty to the bourgeoisie they had denied for so long. The result was an explosion in economic growth and proof that economic change depends less on foreign trade, investment, or material causes, and a whole lot more on ideas and what people believe. Or so says Deirdre N. (...) in _Bourgeois Dignity_, a fiercely contrarian history that wages a similar argument about economics in the West. Here she turns her attention to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe to reconsider the birth of the industrial revolution and the rise of capitalism. According to McCloskey, our modern world was not the product of new markets and innovations, but rather the result of shifting opinions about them. During this time, talk of private property, commerce, and even the bourgeoisie itself radically altered, becoming far more approving and flying in the face of prejudices several millennia old. The wealth of nations, then, didn’t grow so dramatically because of economic factors: it grew because rhetoric about markets and free enterprise finally became enthusiastic and encouraging of their inherent dignity. An utterly fascinating sequel to her critically acclaimed book _The Bourgeois Virtues, Bourgeois Dignity_ is a feast of intellectual riches from one of our most spirited and ambitious historians—a work that will forever change our understanding of how the power of persuasion shapes our economic lives. (shrink)
     
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  7. Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Is economics a science? Deidre McCloskey says 'Yes, but'. Yes, economics measures and predicts, but - like other sciences - it uses literary methods too. Economists use stories as geologists do, and metaphors as physicists do. The result is that the sciences, economics among them, must be read as 'rhetoric', in the sense of writing with intent. McCloskey's books, The Rhetoric of Economics and If You're So Smart, have been widely discussed. In Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics he (...)
     
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  8. Bourgeois Dignity: Why Economics Can't Explain the Modern World.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    The big economic story of our times is not the Great Recession. It is how China and India began to embrace neoliberal ideas of economics and attributed a sense of dignity and liberty to the bourgeoisie they had denied for so long. The result was an explosion in economic growth and proof that economic change depends less on foreign trade, investment, or material causes, and a whole lot more on ideas and what people believe. Or so says Deirdre N. (...) in _Bourgeois Dignity_, a fiercely contrarian history that wages a similar argument about economics in the West. Here she turns her attention to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe to reconsider the birth of the industrial revolution and the rise of capitalism. According to McCloskey, our modern world was not the product of new markets and innovations, but rather the result of shifting opinions about them. During this time, talk of private property, commerce, and even the bourgeoisie itself radically altered, becoming far more approving and flying in the face of prejudices several millennia old. The wealth of nations, then, didn’t grow so dramatically because of economic factors: it grew because rhetoric about markets and free enterprise finally became enthusiastic and encouraging of their inherent dignity. An utterly fascinating sequel to her critically acclaimed book _The Bourgeois Virtues, Bourgeois Dignity_ is a feast of intellectual riches from one of our most spirited and ambitious historians—a work that will forever change our understanding of how the power of persuasion shapes our economic lives. (shrink)
     
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  9. A Bibliography of Historical Economics to 1980.Donald N. McCloskey & Hersh Jr (eds.) - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    Historians and economists will find here what their fields have in common - the movement since the 1950s known variously as 'cliometrics', 'economic history', or 'historical economics'. A leading figure in the movement, Donald McCloskey, has compiled, with the help of George Hersh and a panel of distinguished advisors, a highly comprehensive bibliography of historical economics covering the period up until 1980. The book will be useful to all economic historians, as well as quantitative historians, applied economists, historical demographers, (...)
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  10. Why Liberalism Works: How True Liberal Values Produce a Freer, More Equal, Prosperous World for All.Deirdre Nansen McCloskey - 2019 - Yale University Press.
    _An insightful and passionately written book explaining why a return to Enlightenment ideals is good for the world__ The greatest challenges facing humankind, according to Deirdre McCloskey, are poverty and tyranny, both of which hold people back. Arguing for a return to true liberal values, this engaging and accessible book develops, defends, and demonstrates how embracing the ideas first espoused by eighteenth-century philosophers like Locke, Smith, Voltaire, and Wollstonecraft is good for everyone. With her trademark wit and deep understanding, (...)
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  11.  15
    Cognitive Mechanisms in Numerical Processing: Evidence From Acquired Dyscalculia.Michael McCloskey - 1992 - Cognition 44 (1-2):107-157.
  12.  8
    Cognitive Processes in Verbal-Number Production: Inferences From the Performance of Brain-Damaged Subjects.Michael McCloskey, Scott M. Sokol & Roberta A. Goodman - 1986 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 115 (4):307-330.
  13.  22
    The Poverty of Methodology.Alfonso Caramazza & Michael McCloskey - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):444-445.
  14.  5
    In Defense of a Modular Architecture for the Number-Processing System: Reply to Campbell and Clark.Scott M. Sokol, Roberta Goodman-Schulman & Michael McCloskey - 1989 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 118 (1):105-110.
  15. Sluicing and Logical Form.Sandra Chung, William A. Ladusaw & James McCloskey - 1995 - Natural Language Semantics 3 (3):239-282.
    This paper presents a novel analysis of Sluicing, an ellipsis construction first described by Ross (1969) and illustrated by the bracketed portion ofI want to do something, but I'm just not sure [what _]. Starting from the assumption that a sluice consists of a displaced Wh-constituent and an empty IP, we show how simple and general LF operations fill out the empty IP and thereby provide it with an interpretable Logical Form. The LF operations we appeal to rely on the (...)
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  16. A Non-Utilitarian Approach to Punishment.H. J. McCloskey - 1965 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 8 (1-4):249 – 263.
    Although the view that punishment is to be justified on utilitarian grounds has obvious appeal, an examination of utilitarianism reveals that, consistently and accurately interpreted, it dictates unjust punishments which are unacceptable to the common moral consciousness. In this rule?utilitarianism is no more satisfactory than is act?utilitarianism. Although the production of the greatest good, or the greatest happiness, of the greatest number is obviously a relevant consideration when determining which punishments may properly be inflicted, the question as to which punishment (...)
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  17.  13
    Habits, Quick and Easy: Perceived Complexity Moderates the Associations of Contextual Stability and Rewards With Behavioral Automaticity.Kiran McCloskey & Blair T. Johnson - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  18. An Examination of Restricted Utilitarianism.H. J. McCloskey - 1957 - Philosophical Review 66 (4):466-485.
  19. God and Evil.H. J. McCloskey - 1960 - Philosophical Quarterly 10 (39):97-114.
  20. Rights.H. J. McCloskey - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (59):115-127.
  21.  20
    Misleading Postevent Information and Memory for Events: Arguments and Evidence Against Memory Impairment Hypotheses.Michael McCloskey & Maria Zaragoza - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (1).
  22.  20
    Secondary Psychopathy, but Not Primary Psychopathy, is Associated with Risky Decision-Making in Noninstitutionalized Young Adults.Andy C. Dean, Lily L. Altstein, Mitchell E. Berman, Joseph I. Constans, Catherine A. Sugar & Michael S. McCloskey - 2013 - Personality and Individual Differences 54:272–277.
    Although risky decision-making has been posited to contribute to the maladaptive behavior of individuals with psychopathic tendencies, the performance of psychopathic groups on a common task of risky decision-making, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara, Damasio, Damasio, & Anderson, 1994), has been equivocal. Different aspects of psychopathy (personality traits, antisocial deviance) and/or moderating variables may help to explain these inconsistent findings. In a sample of college students (N = 129, age 18–27), we examined the relationship between primary and secondary psychopathic (...)
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  23.  12
    Misleading Postevent Information and Memory for Events: Arguments and Evidence Against Memory Impairment Hypotheses.Michael McCloskey & Maria Zaragoza - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 114 (1):1-16.
  24.  20
    Mirror-Image Confusions: Implications for Representation and Processing of Object Orientation.Emma Gregory & Michael McCloskey - 2010 - Cognition 116 (1):110-129.
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  25. The Patient Self-Determination Act.Elizabeth Leibold McCloskey - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (2):163-169.
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  26.  34
    The Unreasonable Ineffectiveness of Fisherian “Tests” in Biology, and Especially in Medicine.Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (1):44-53.
    Biometrics has done damage with levels of R or p or Student’s t. The damage widened with Ronald A. Fisher’s victory in the 1920s and 1930s in devising mechanical methods of “testing,” against methods of common sense and scientific impact, “oomph.” The scale along which one would measure oomph is particularly clear in biomedical sciences: life or death. Cardiovascular epidemiology, to take one example, combines with gusto the “fallacy of the transposed conditional” and what we call the “sizeless stare” of (...)
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  27. Moral Rights and Animals.H. J. McCloskey - 1979 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):23 – 54.
    In Section I, the purely conceptual issue as to whether animals other than human beings, all or some, may possess rights is examined. This is approached via a consideration of the concept of a moral right, and by way of examining the claims of sentience, consciousness, capacities for pleasure and pain, having desires, possessing interests, self-consciousness, rationality in various senses. It is argued that only beings possessed actually or potentially of the capacity to be morally self-determining can be possessors of (...)
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  28.  19
    Naive Beliefs in “Sophisticated” Subjects: Misconceptions About Trajectories of Objects.Alfonso Caramazza, Michael McCloskey & Bert Green - 1981 - Cognition 9 (2):117-123.
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  29. A Note on Utilitarian Punishment.H. J. McCloskey - 1963 - Mind 72 (288):599.
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  30. The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics.George F. DeMartino & Deirdre N. McCloskey (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
     
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  31.  12
    Measured, Unmeasured, Mismeasured, and Unjustified Pessimism: A Review Essay of Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century.Deirdre Nansen McCloskey - 2014 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (2):73.
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  32.  19
    Profound Loss of General Knowledge in Retrograde Amnesia: Evidence From an Amnesic Artist.Emma Gregory, Michael McCloskey & Barbara Landau - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  33.  7
    Xenophon the Philosopher: E Pluribus Plura.Benjamin Mccloskey - 2017 - American Journal of Philology 138 (4):605-640.
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  34.  48
    Coercion: Its Nature and Significance.H. J. McCloskey - 1980 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):335-351.
  35.  87
    Peter Singer and Non-Voluntary 'Euthanasia': Tripping Down the Slippery Slope.Suzanne Uniacke & H. J. Mccloskey - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):203-219.
    This article discusses the nature of euthanasia, and the way in which redevelopment of the concept of euthanasia in some influential recent philosophical writing has led to morally less discriminating killing/letting die/not saving being misdescribed as euthanasia. Peter Singer's defence of non-voluntary ‘euthanasia’of defective infants in his influential book Practical Ethics is critically evaluated. We argue that Singer's pseudo-euthanasia arguments in Practical Ethics are unsatisfactory as approaches to determining the legitimacy of killing, and that these arguments present a total utilitarian (...)
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  36.  8
    Representation of Letter Position in Spelling: Evidence From Acquired Dysgraphia.Simon Fischer-Baum, Michael McCloskey & Brenda Rapp - 2010 - Cognition 115 (3):466-490.
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  37.  68
    Privacy and the Right to Privacy.H. J. McCloskey - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (211):17 - 38.
    The right to privacy is one of the rights most widely demanded today. Privacy has not always so been demanded. The reasons for the present concern for privacy are complex and obscure. They obviously relate both to the possibilities for very considerable enjoyment of privacy by the bulk of people living in affluent societies brought about by twentieth-century affluence, and to the development of very efficient methods of thoroughly and systematically invading this newly found privacy. However, interesting and important as (...)
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  38. The State as an Organism, as a Person, and as an End in Itself.H. J. McCloskey - 1963 - Philosophical Review 72 (3):306-326.
  39.  96
    Utilitarianism: Two Difficulties.H. J. McCloskey - 1973 - Philosophical Studies 24 (1):62 - 63.
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  40.  83
    The Moral Case for Experimentation on Animals.H. J. McCloskey - 1987 - The Monist 70 (1):64-82.
    The moral case for experimentation on animals rests both on the goods to be realized, the evils to be avoided thereby, and on the duty to respect persons and to secure them in the enjoyment of their natural moral rights. Some experimentation on animals presents no problems of justification as it involves no harm at all to the animals which are the subject of experiments and is such as to seek to achieve an advance in knowledge. Experiments on non-sentient animals, (...)
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  41.  32
    Meta-Ethics and Normative Ethics.Henry John McCloskey - 1969 - The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.
  42. Utilitarian and Retributive Punishment.H. J. McCloskey - 1967 - Journal of Philosophy 64 (3):91-110.
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  43.  99
    The Right to Life.H. J. McCloskey - 1975 - Mind 84 (335):403-425.
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  44.  18
    Minimal Statism and Metamodernism: Reply to Friedman.Donald N. McCloskey - 1992 - Critical Review 6 (1):107-112.
    Friedman misunderstands postmodernism?or, as it could better be called, metamodernism. Metamodernism is the common sense beyond the lunatic formulas of the Vienna Circle and conventional statistics. It has little to do with the anxieties of Continental intellectuals. It therefore is necessary for serious empirical work on the role of the state.
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  45. God and Evil.H. J. McCloskey - 1974 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (1):323-324.
     
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  46.  27
    The Reproving of Karl Polanyi.Santhi Hejeebu & Deirdre McCloskey - 1999 - Critical Review 13 (3-4):285-314.
    Karl Polanyi's The Great Transformation has had enormous influence since its publication in 1944. In form, this influence has been salutary: Polanyi targets one of the main weaknesses of modern economics. But in substance, Polanyi's influence has been baneful. Mirroring the methodological blindness he criticizes, Polanyi insists on the all?or?nothing existence/ nonexistence of laissez faire?and on its all?or?nothing goodness/badness.
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  47. 'Suppose Everyone Did the Same'--A Note.H. J. McCloskey - 1966 - Mind 75 (299):432-433.
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  48.  37
    How Economists Persuade.Donald N. McCloskey - 1994 - Journal of Economic Methodology 1 (1):15-32.
  49.  18
    Signifying Nothing: Reply to Hoover and Siegler.Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak - 2008 - Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (1):39-55.
    After William Gosset (1876?1937), the ?Student? of Student's t, the best statisticians have distinguished economic (or agronomic or psychological or medical) significance from merely statistical ?significance? at conventional levels. A singular exception among the best was Ronald A. Fisher, who argued in the 1920s that statistical significance at the 0.05 level is a necessary and sufficient condition for establishing a scientific result. After Fisher many economists and some others ? but rarely physicists, chemists, and geologists, who seldom use Fisher?significance ? (...)
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  50. The Consequences of Economic Rhetoric.Arjo Klamer, Donald N. McCloskey & Robert M. Solow (eds.) - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    The field of economics proves to be a matter of metaphor and storytelling - its mathematics is metaphoric and its policy-making is narrative. Economists have begun to realize this and to rethink how they speak. This volume is the result of a conference held at Wellesley College, involving both theoretical and applied economists, that explored the consequences of the rhetoric and the conversation of the field of economics.
     
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