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Mackenzie Graham
Oxford University
  1.  1
    From Awareness to Prognosis: Ethical Implications of Uncovering Hidden Awareness in Behaviorally Nonresponsive Patients.Mackenzie Graham, Eugene Wallace, Colin Doherty, Alison Mccann & Lorina Naci - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (4):616-631.
    :Long-term patient outcomes after severe brain injury are highly variable, and reliable prognostic indicators are urgently needed to guide treatment decisions. Functional neuroimaging is a highly sensitive method of uncovering covert cognition and awareness in patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, and there has been increased interest in using it as a research tool in acutely brain injured patients. When covert awareness is detected in a research context, this may impact surrogate decisionmaking—including decisions about life-sustaining treatment—even though the prognostic value (...)
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  2.  3
    Working for the Weekend Is Not Meaningful Work.Charles Weijer & Mackenzie Graham - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (9):48-50.
    Volume 19, Issue 9, September 2019, Page 48-50.
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  3.  8
    Assessing Decision-Making Capacity in the Behaviorally Nonresponsive Patient With Residual Covert Awareness.Andrew Peterson, Lorina Naci, Charles Weijer, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Mackenzie Graham & Adrian M. Owen - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (4):3-14.
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  4.  14
    An Ethics of Welfare for Patients Diagnosed as Vegetative With Covert Awareness.Mackenzie Graham, Charles Weijer, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernandez-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Andrew Peterson, Kathy N. Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (2):31-41.
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  5.  11
    Informed Consent for Functional MRI Research on Comatose Patients Following Severe Brain Injury: Balancing the Social Benefits of Research Against Patient Autonomy.Tommaso Bruni, Mackenzie Graham, Loretta Norton, Teneille Gofton, Adrian M. Owen & Charles Weijer - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (5):299-303.
    Functional MRI shows promise as a candidate prognostication method in acutely comatose patients following severe brain injury. However, further research is needed before this technique becomes appropriate for clinical practice. Drawing on a clinical case, we investigate the process of obtaining informed consent for this kind of research and identify four ethical issues. After describing each issue, we propose potential solutions which would make a patient’s participation in research compatible with her rights and interests. First, we defend the need for (...)
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  6.  21
    A Fate Worse Than Death? The Well-Being of Patients Diagnosed as Vegetative With Covert Awareness.Mackenzie Graham - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (5):1005-1020.
    Patients in the vegetative state are wholly unaware of themselves, or their surroundings. However, a minority of patients diagnosed as vegetative are actually aware. What is the well-being of these patients? How are their lives going, for them? It has been argued that on a reasonable conception of well-being, these patients are faring so poorly that it may be in their best interests not to continue existing. I argue against this claim. Standard conceptions of well-being do not clearly support the (...)
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  7.  16
    Acknowledging Awareness: Informing Families of Individual Research Results for Patients in the Vegetative State.Mackenzie Graham, Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Lorina Naci, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Laura Gonzalez-Lara & Adrian M. Owen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (7):534-538.
  8.  9
    More Harm Than Good: Neurotechnological Thought Apprehension in Forensic Psychiatry.Mackenzie Graham & Phoebe Friesen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):17-19.
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  9.  31
    Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury.Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques (...)
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  10.  15
    Can They Feel? The Capacity for Pain and Pleasure in Patients with Cognitive Motor Dissociation.Mackenzie Graham - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (2):153-169.
    Unresponsive wakefulness syndrome is a disorder of consciousness wherein a patient is awake, but completely non-responsive at the bedside. However, research has shown that a minority of these patients remain aware, and can demonstrate their awareness via functional neuroimaging; these patients are referred to as having ‘cognitive motor dissociation’. Unfortunately, we have little insight into the subjective experiences of these patients, making it difficult to determine how best to promote their well-being. In this paper, I argue that the capacity to (...)
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