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Robert Woolfolk
Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  1.  90
    Identification, Situational Constraint, and Social Cognition: Studies in the Attribution of Moral Responsibility.Robert L. Woolfolk, John M. Doris & John M. Darley - 2006 - Cognition 100 (2):283-301.
  2. Experimental Philosophy: A Methodological Critique.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):79-87.
    This article offers a critique of research practices typical of experimental philosophy. To that end, it presents a review of methodological issues that have proved crucial to the quality of research in the biobehavioral sciences. It discusses various shortcomings in the experimental philosophy literature related to (1) the credibility of self-report questionnaires, (2) the validity and reliability of measurement, (3) the adherence to appropriate procedures for sampling, random assignment, and handling of participants, and (4) the meticulousness of study reporting. It (...)
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  3. Variantism About Responsibility.John M. Doris, Joshua Knobe & Robert L. Woolfolk - 2007 - Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):183–214.
  4. The Harmful Dysfunction Analysis of Mental Disorder.Dominic Murphy & Robert L. Woolfolk - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):241-252.
    This paper is a critical analysis of the concept of mental disorder recently advanced by Jerome Wakefield. Wakefield suggests that mental disorders are most aptly conceived as "harmful dysfunctions" involving two distinct and separable components: the failure of the mechanism in the person to perform a natural function for which the mechanism was designed by natural selection, and a value judgment that the dysfunction is undesirable.
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  5.  61
    Cognitive Theories of Mental Illness.Brendan A. Maher, A. W. Young, Philip Gerrans, John Campbell, Kai Vogeley, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Owen Flanagan, Robert L. Woolfolk, Barry Smith & Joëlle Proust - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended to (...)
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  6. Conceptual Analysis Versus Scientific Understanding: An Assessment of Wakefield's Folk Psychiatry.Dominic Murphy & Robert L. Woolfolk - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):271-293.
    Wakefield's (2000) responses to our paper herein (Murphy and Woolfolk 2000) are not only unsuccessful, they force him into a position that leaves him unable to preserve any distinction between disorders and other problems. They also conflate distinct scientific concepts of function. Further, Wakefield fails to show that ascriptions of human dysfunction do not ineliminably involve values. -/- We suggest Wakefield is analyzing a concept that plays a role in commonsense thought and arguing that the task of science is to (...)
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  7.  19
    Empirical Tests of Philosophical Intuitions.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):415-416.
    Experimental philosophy seeks to examine empirically various factual issues that, either explicitly or implicitly, lie at the foundations of philosophical positions. A study of this genre (Miller & Feltz, 2011) was critiqued. Questions about the study were raised and broader issues pertaining to the field of experimental philosophy were discussed.
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  8. Malfunction and Mental Illness.Robert L. Woolfolk - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended to (...)
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  9. The Cure of Souls Science, Values, and Psychotherapy.Robert L. Woolfolk - 1998
  10.  43
    The Power of Negative Thinking: Truth, Melancholia, and the Tragic Sense of Life.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2002 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):19-27.
    In this brief essay the author argues that the contemporary "positive psychology" movement fails to emphasize important aspects of human existence that are essential to human excellence. Through an explication of some historical, cross-cultural, and literary examples, the author argues for the importance of a kind of "negative psychology" that is fundamental to an adequate comprehension of the human situation. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  11.  44
    Count No One Happy: Eudaimonia and Positive Psychology.Robert L. Woolfolk & Rachel H. Wasserman - 2005 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):81-90.
    Some aspects of "second-generation" Positive Psychology are analyzed and their origins explored. In particular, Seligman's importation of the concept of eudaimonia from Aristotelian ethics is critiqued and found to be problematic. This conclusion is reached through an examination of the concept of eudaimonia as it was employed in ancient philosophy. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  12.  45
    Rationing Mental Health Care: Parity, Disparity, and Justice.Robert L. Woolfolk & John M. Doris - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (5):469–485.
    Recent policy debates in the US over access to mental health care have raised several philosophically complex ethical and conceptual issues. The defeat of mental health parity legislation in the US Congress has brought new urgency and relevance to theoretical and empirical investigations into the nature of mental illness and its relation to other forms of sickness and disability. Manifold, nebulous, and often competing conceptions of mental illness make the creation of coherent public policy exceedingly difficult. Referencing a variety of (...)
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  13.  35
    On the Border: Reflections on the Meaning of Self-Injury in Borderline Personality Disorder.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):29-31.
  14.  10
    The Real and the Good.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2003 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):1-1.
    In this journal editorial, the author introduces the first debate to occur in the Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology during his tenure as editor. Three interlocutors take on Daniel N. Robinson in a debate that focuses upon Praise and Blame, Robinson's erudite and spirited defense of moral realism. Robinson replies to each response to his work. The exchange encompasses the question of the status of ethical concepts as well as that of ultimate nature of morality. When Professor Robinson engages (...)
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  15. Behaviorism, Rorty, and the End of Epistemology.Robert L. Woolfolk - 1983 - Behavior and Philosophy 11 (2):111.
  16.  7
    Hermeneutics and Psychoanalysis.Robert L. Woolfolk - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (2):265-266.
  17. Identification, Situational Constraint, and Social Cognition : Studies in the Attribution of Moral Responsibility.Robert L. Woolfolk, John M. Doris & & John M. Darley - 2007 - In Joshua Knobe (ed.), Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  18. The Concept of Mental Illness: An Analysis of Four Pivotal Issues.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2001 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (2):161-178.
    The concept of mental illness is explored through an examination of four key foundational issues. These are the notion of the “mental” as it relates to psychopathology; the concept of illness; the relationship of mental illness to concepts of function and malfunction; and sociocultural dimensions of psychopathology. The problematic status of the concept of mental illness is investigated through locating it within the various discourses of biomedicine, psychology, law, and sociology and by explicating and relating the philosophical underpinnings of those (...)
     
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  19.  1
    Virtue and Psychotherapy.Robert L. Woolfolk - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):41-43.
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