Results for 'health communication'

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  1. Expertise and Metaphors in Health Communication.Ervas Francesca, Montibeller Marcello, Rossi Maria Grazia & Salis Pietro - 2016 - Medicina and Storia 9:91-108.
    The paper focuses on the kind of expertise required by doctors in health communication and argues that such an expertise is twofold: both epistemological and communicative competences are necessary to achieve compliance with the patient. Firstly, we introduce the specific epistemic competences that deal with diagnosis and its problems. Secondly, we focus on the communicative competences and argue that an inappropriate strategy in communicating the reasons of diagnosis and therapy can make patient compliance unworkable. Finally, we focus on (...)
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  2. Public Health Communication Interventions Values and Ethical Dilemmas.Nurit Guttman - 2000
     
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  3. The Use of Persuasion in Public Health Communication: An Ethical Critique.J. Rossi & M. Yudell - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (2):192-205.
    Public health communications often attempt to persuade their audience to adopt a particular belief or pursue a particular course of action. To a large extent, the ethical defensibility of persuasion appears to be assumed by public health practitioners; however, a handful of academic treatments have called into question the ethical defensibility of persuasive risk- and health communication. In addition, the widespread use of persuasive tactics in public health communications warrants a close look at their ethical (...)
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  4.  2
    The Argument From Example in Health Communication.Hans Hoeken, Anniek Boeijinga & José Sanders - 2018 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 7 (3):249-265.
    The argument from example is frequently used in health communication interventions. Some of these arguments are narrative in nature, in the sense that they relate a series of logically related events containing an experiencing agonist. In this article, research on narrative persuasion is discussed in order to show how such narrative arguments from examples can influence the target audience’s beliefs about the possibility that a certain action will lead to certain consequences, the desirability of such consequences, as well (...)
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  5.  16
    Understanding Truth in Health Communication.Seow Ting Lee - 2011 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (4):263-282.
    This study examines truthfulness through eight dimensions to explicate truth in health communication and explores the relationships between message truthfulness and message attributes and audience characteristics. A content analysis of 974 television antismoking ads from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reveals a high degree of truthfulness. Message truthfulness is related to thematic frames, emotion appeals, source, age, social role and smoking status, and positive framing of consequences. Ads targeted at teens/youth and smokers tend to have lower message (...)
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  6.  16
    Ethical Health Communication: A Content Analysis of Predominant Frames and Primes in Public Service Announcements.Renita Coleman & Lesa Hatley Major - 2014 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (2):91-107.
    Health communication is increasingly being held to higher moral standards. No longer do noble goals outweigh ethical concerns. This content analysis examines ethical frames and primes in health public service announcements so we may begin to address the most prevalent of the problematic ones and find more ethical alternatives. In this study, 80% of the PSAs conveyed messages that individuals were to blame. Negative emotion, such as fear, was the second most frequent frame. Stereotypes of women were (...)
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  7.  6
    Implementation of Innovative Attitudes and Behaviour in Primary Health Care by Means of Strategic Communication: A 7‐Year Follow‐Up.Helena Morténius, Bertil Marklund, Lars Palm, Cecilia Björkelund & Amir Baigi - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):659-665.
  8.  37
    Guilt, Fear, Stigma and Knowledge Gaps: Ethical Issues in Public Health Communication Interventions.Nurit Guttman & Charles T. Salmon - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (6):531–552.
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  9.  21
    Comprehending Adverbs of Doubt and Certainty in Health Communication: A Multidimensional Scaling Approach.Norman S. Segalowitz, Marina M. Doucerain, Renata F. I. Meuter, Yue Zhao, Julia Hocking & Andrew G. Ryder - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  10.  8
    Health Communication, Public Mistrust, and the Politics of “Rationality”.Sara M. Bergstresser - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):57-59.
  11. Do Social Networking Sites Enhance the Attractiveness of Risky Health Behavior? Impression Management in Adolescents' Communication on Facebook and its Ethical Implications.J. Loss, V. Lindacher & J. Curbach - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (1):5-16.
    Social networking sites (SNS) are of increasing importance for adolescents’ social life. As adolescents are prone to display risky health behavior in the offline world, it is likely that they use their online profiles and communications to report on unhealthy behaviors, too. This may in turn enhance the perceived attractiveness of risky behavior within the adolescent cohort. Drawing on the insights of impression management theory, we argue in this article that adolescents use a variety of impression management tactics in (...)
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  12.  13
    Überreden Für Die Gute Sache? Techniken Öffentlicher Gesundheitskommunikation Und Ihre Ethischen ImplikationenConvincing for the Good Cause? Techniques of Public Health Communication and Their Ethical Implications.Manuel Schaper, Solveig Lena Hansen & Silke Schicktanz - 2019 - Ethik in der Medizin 31 (1):23-44.
    ZusammenfassungDer Beitrag analysiert Techniken öffentlicher Gesundheitskommunikation und skizziert im Ausblick Minimalbedingungen für ihre ethische Vertretbarkeit. Dazu wird erstens an einem aktuellen Beispiel veranschaulicht, wie mittels Text und Bild die Öffentlichkeit überzeugt werden soll, ein bestimmtes Gesundheitsverhalten an den Tag zu legen. Zweitens werden anhand der internationalen Ethik-Debatte fünf Grundtypen von Techniken in der Gesundheitskommunikation rekonstruiert und entlang von Mittel, Zweck, Folgen für Adressaten sowie Implikationen für Autonomie aus ethischer Sicht unterschieden. Am besonders ambivalenten Beispiel der Persuasion wird dann drittens diskutiert, (...)
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  13.  19
    Literacy and Health Communication: Reversing the 'Inverse Care Law'.Dean Schillinger - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):15 – 18.
  14.  13
    Health Communication: Lessons From Family Planning and Reproductive Health. By Phyllis Tilson Piotrow, D. Lawrence Kincaid, Jose G. Rimon II & Ward Rinehart. Pp. 307. (Praeger Publishers, CT, USA, 1997.) ISBN 0-275-95578-8. [REVIEW]S. J. Goldstein - 1999 - Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (3):425-432.
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  15.  16
    Value-Ladenness and Rationality in Health Communication.John Rossi & Michael Yudell - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):20-22.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 20-22, February 2012.
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  16.  2
    O Rganizations, Small and Large, Public and Private, Continue to Rely on Health Communication as a Way to Motivate and Support Healthful.Specifying When & How Gain - 2011 - In Gideon Keren (ed.), Perspectives on Framing. Psychology Press. pp. 257.
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  17.  6
    Social communication in health for disease prevention in the community.Sandra Cecilia Rodríguez Roura, Lourdes de la C. Cabrera Reyes & Esmeralda Calero Yera - 2018 - Humanidades Médicas 18 (2):384-404.
    RESUMEN Las investigaciones en el campo de la teoría de la comunicación apuntan a que en la actualidad el proceso es, desde lo social, una vía para el logro de las relaciones interpersonales y posee sus potencialidades estratégicas para la construcción social y cultural del hombre. Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica para el acercamiento inicial al estudio de las temáticas de la comunicación social en salud y la prevención de enfermedades en la comunidad. Por ello el objetivo del presente trabajo (...)
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  18.  23
    Visual Communication to Children in the Supermarket Context: Health Protective or Exploitive? [REVIEW]Brent Berry & Taralyn McMullen - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):333-348.
    In light of growing concerns about obesity, Winson (2004, Agriculture and Human Values 21(4): 299–312) calls for more research into the supermarket foodscape as a point of connection between consumers and food choice. In this study, we systematically examine the marketing of ready-to-eat breakfast cereals to children in Toronto, Ontario supermarkets. The supermarket cereal aisle is a relatively unstudied visual collage of competing brands, colors, spokes-characters, and incentives aimed at influencing consumer choice. We found that breakfast cereal products with higher-than-average (...)
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  19.  16
    Information and Communication Technologies, Genes, and Peer-Production of Knowledge to Empower Citizens’ Health.Annibale Biggeri & Mariachiara Tallacchini - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (3):871-885.
    The different and seemingly unrelated practices of Information and Communication Technologies used to collect and share personal and scientific data within networked communities, and the organized storage of human genetic samples and information—namely biobanking—have merged with another recent epistemic and social phenomenon, namely scientists and citizens collaborating as “peers” in creating knowledge. These different dimensions can be found in joint initiatives where scientists-and-citizens use genetic information and ICT as powerful ways to gain more control over their health and (...)
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  20.  14
    Enhancing Public Health Law Communication Linkages.Ross D. Silverman - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s3):29-49.
    Although interest in the field of public health law has dramatically increased over the past two decades, there remain significant challenges in communicating and sharing public health law-related knowledge. Access to quality information, which may assist in a public health department's efforts to protect the public's health, welfare, and safety, varies widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and interjurisdictional communication remains at best a patchwork quilt with many holes. What follows is an analysis of several approaches (...)
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  21. The Oxford Practice Skills Course Ethics, Law, and Communication Skills in Health Care Education.R. A. Hope, K. W. M. Fulford & Anne Yates - 1996
  22.  16
    Democratic Deficit and Communication Hyper‐Inflation in Health Care Systems.Peter Andras PhD & Bruce G. Charlton Md - 2002 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (3):291-297.
  23.  25
    Ethical Principles and the Communication of Forensic Mental Health Assessments.Alfred Allan & Thomas Grisso - 2014 - Ethics and Behavior 24 (6):467-477.
    Our premise is that ethics is the essence of good forensic practice and that mental health professionals must adhere to the ethical principles, standards, and guidelines of their professional bodies when they communicate their findings and opinions. We demonstrate that adhering to ethical principles can improve the quality of forensic reports and communications. We demonstrate this by focusing on the most basic principles that underlie professional ethical standards and guidelines, namely, Fidelity and Responsibility, Integrity, Respecting Rights and Dignity of (...)
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  24.  18
    From Human Wrongs to Universal Rights: Communication and Feminist Challenges for the Promotion of Women's Health in the Third World.Sirrku Kristiina Hellsten - 2001 - Developing World Bioethics 1 (2):98–115.
    This article argues that in the quest for global bioethics in its relation to the promotion of women's health and women's rights, the main challenge is to, first, rise above the relativist trap and second, to solve the false dilemma between individualism and collectivism. Particularly in order to improve women's position and advance their well‐being in many developing countries with patriarchal cultural practices, there is an urgent need to introduce modern medicine and to share more evenly and efficiently the (...)
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  25.  9
    Communication Technologies Through an Etymological Lens: Looking for a Classification, Reflections About Health, Medicine and Care.Massimiliano Colucci - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (4):601-606.
  26.  10
    Review Article: Risk Communication in the Patient‐Health Professional Relationship.Stephen Buetow, Judith Cantrill & Bonnie Sibbald - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (3):261-268.
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  27.  7
    Risk Communication in the Patient-Health Professional Relationship.Stephen Buetow, Judith Cantrill & Bonnie Sibbald - 1998 - Health Care Analysis 6 (3):261-268.
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  28.  4
    Communication and Cognitive Impairments and Health Care Decision Making in MND: A Narrative Review.Camille Paynter, Madeline Cruice, Susan Mathers, Heidi Gregory & Adam P. Vogel - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (6):1182-1192.
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  29.  72
    The Strategic Function of Variants of Pragmatic Argumentation in Health Brochures.Lotte van Poppel - 2012 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 1 (1):97-112.
    In this paper, I examine the strategic function of four variants of pragmatic argumentation in the context of advisory health brochures. I argue that each variant functions as a strategic manoeuvre that deals with potential countermoves: with variant I and II writers can address anticipated doubt with respect to the standpoint and with variants III and IV they can strategically erase potential criticism of or possible alternatives to the proposed action. Keywords: health brochures, health communication, pragma-dialectical (...)
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  30.  5
    Do Patients and Health Care Professionals View the Communication Processes of Clinical Research Differently? A Rasch Analysis From a Survey.Luis González-de Paz, Belchin Kostov, Pilar Solans-Julian, M. Dolores Navarro-Rubio & Antoni Sisó-Almirall - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (5):790-797.
  31.  40
    The Use of 'No Evidence' Statements in Public Health.Louise Cummings - 2015 - Informal Logic 35 (4):32-64.
    Public health communication makes extensive use of a linguistic formulation that will be called the “no evidence” statement. This is a written or spoken statement of the form “There is no evidence that P” where P stands for a proposition that typically describes a human health risk. Danger lurks in these expressions for the hearer or reader who is not logically perspicacious, as arguments that use them are only warranted under certain conditions. The extent to which members (...)
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  32.  37
    Democratic Deficit and Communication Hyper-Inflation in Health Care Systems.Bruce G. Charlton - 2002 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (3):291-297.
  33. Development of Professional Knowledge in Action. Experiences From an Action Science Design Focusing on'Acknowledging Communication'in Mental Health.Solfrid Vatne - 2008 - Encyclopaideia 24:9-29.
     
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  34.  22
    Optimizing the Quality of Health Care Through Better Communication: Case Conferences. [REVIEW]Alfred Sanfilippo - 1997 - HEC Forum 9 (3):256-263.
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  35.  7
    Enhancing Public Health Law Communication Linkages.Ross D. Silverman - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s3):29-49.
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  36. Risk, Communication and Health.H. Joffe - 2005 - Hermes 14:121-131.
     
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  37.  7
    Intercultural Communication in Child and Family Health: Insights From Postcolonial Feminist Scholarship and Three-Body Analysis.Julian Grant & Yoni Luxford - 2008 - Nursing Inquiry 15 (4):309-319.
  38.  5
    Computer-Mediated Communication: A Tool for Public Health; a Barrier for Healthy Activity.Michael J. Fotheringham - 2002 - In Serge P. Shohov (ed.), Advances in Psychology Research. Nova Science Publishers. pp. 12--105.
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  39.  4
    Ethical Issues in the Activities of Mass Media Communication in Health Education.Claire Rayner - 1985 - In Spyros Doxiadis (ed.), Ethical Issues in Preventive Medicine. Distributors for United States and Canada. pp. 65--71.
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  40. The Role of ‘Mediators’ of Communication in Health Professionals' Intersectoral Collaboration: An Ethnographically Inspired Study.Anne Bendix Andersen, Kirsten Beedholm, Raymond Kolbæk & Kirsten Frederiksen - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry.
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  41.  15
    From Risk Factors to Health Resources in Medical Practice.Hanne Hollnagel - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (3):255-262.
    The healing and preventive powers of people's health resources and self-assessed knowledge have so far been grossly underestimated in medicine. In this article, we call attention to ethical and epistemological dilemmas related to knowledge, values, communication, and autonomy embedded in the prevailing risk-oriented epidemiology, and suggest a patient-centred salutogenetic approach to promote a better balance between resources and risks in medicine. Identification and intervention upon risk factors can provide hypotheses about origins of disease and predict and sometimes prevent (...)
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  42.  23
    Ethical Sharing of Health Data in Online Platforms- Which Values Should Be Considered?Brígida Riso, Aaro Tupasela, Danya F. Vears, Heike Felzmann, Julian Cockbain, Michele Loi, Nana C. H. Kongsholm, Silvia Zullo & Vojin Rakic - 2017 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 13 (1):1-27.
    Intensified and extensive data production and data storage are characteristics of contemporary western societies. Health data sharing is increasing with the growth of Information and Communication Technology platforms devoted to the collection of personal health and genomic data. However, the sensitive and personal nature of health data poses ethical challenges when data is disclosed and shared even if for scientific research purposes. With this in mind, the Science and Values Working Group of the COST Action CHIP (...)
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  43. “I’D Rather Be Dead Than Disabled”—The Ableist Conflation and the Meanings of Disability.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2017 - Review of Communication 17 (3):149-63.
    Despite being assailed for decades by disability activists and disability studies scholars spanning the humanities and social sciences, the medical model of disability—which conceptualizes disability as an individual tragedy or misfortune due to genetic or environmental insult—still today structures many cases of patient–practitioner communication. Synthesizing and recasting work done across critical disability studies and philosophy of disability, I argue that the reason the medical model of disability remains so gallingly entrenched is due to what I call the “ableist conflation” (...)
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  44.  17
    Significant Choice and Crisis Decision Making: MeritCare’s Public Communication in the Fen–Phen Case. [REVIEW]Renae A. Streifel, Bethany L. Beebe, Shari R. Veil & Timothy L. Sellnow - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (4):389 - 397.
    This study examines the communication strategies employed by MeritCare’s public relations staff during the fen–phen case. The ethic of significant choice was the primary lens for the study. The study revealed that MeritCare’s public relations staff members believed they did, in fact, follow the ethic of significant choice. Specifically, they perceived that the biases held by staff helped maintain the public’s safety as the primary issue during the fen–phen events. They also believed that their communication strategies allowed them (...)
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  45.  23
    The Web-Rhetoric of Companies Offering Home-Based Personal Health Monitoring.Anders Nordgren - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (2):103-118.
    In this paper I investigate the web-rhetoric of companies offering home-based personal health monitoring to patients and elderly people. Two main rhetorical methods are found, namely a reference to practical benefits and a use of prestige words like “quality of life” and “independence”. I interpret the practical benefits in terms of instrumental values and the prestige words in terms of final values. I also reconstruct the arguments on the websites in terms of six different types of argument. Finally, I (...)
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  46.  22
    €œOn a Supposed Right to Lie [to the Public] From Benevolent Motives” Communicating Health Risks to the Public.Darren Shickle - 2000 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (3):241-249.
    There are three main categories of rationale for withholding information or telling lies: if overwhelming harm can only be averted through deceit; complete triviality such that it is irrelevant whether the truth is told; a duty to protect the interests of others. Public health authorities are frequently having to form judgements about the public interest, whether to release information or issue warnings. In June 1992, routine surveillance detected patulin levels (a known carcinogen) in samples of apple juice exceeding safety (...)
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  47.  9
    Patient‐Centredness, Self‐Rated Health, and Patient Empowerment: Should Providers Spend More Time Communicating with Their Patients?James E. Rohrer, Laurie Wilshusen, Steven C. Adamson & Stephen Merry - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (4):548-551.
  48.  13
    Bioethics and the Framing of Climate Change's Health Risks.Sean A. Valles - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (5):334-341.
    Cheryl Cox MacPherson recently argued, in an article for this journal, that ‘Climate Change is a Bioethics Problem’. This article elaborates on that position, particularly highlighting bioethicists' potential ability to help reframe the current climate change discourse to give more attention to its health risks. This reframing process is especially important because of the looming problem of climate change skepticism. Recent empirical evidence from science framing experiments indicates that the public reacts especially positively to climate change messages framed in (...)
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  49.  14
    An Evaluation Approach for a New Paradigm - Health Care Integration.Inge De Jong & Claire Jackson - 2001 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (1):71-79.
    This paper explores an approach to the implementation and evaluation of integrated health service delivery. It identifies the key issues involved in integration evaluation, provides a framework for assessment and identifies areas for the development of new tools and measures. A proactive role for evaluators in responding to health service reform is advocated.
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  50.  89
    “It is About Our Body, Our Own Body!”: On the Difficulty of Telling Dutch Women Under 50 That Mammography is Not for Them.Peter J. Schulz & Bert Meuffels - 2012 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 1 (1):130-142.
    This article is concerned with the reasons why sometimes good arguments in health communication leaflets fail to convince the targeted audience. As an illustrative example it uses the age-dependent eligibility of women in the Netherlands to receive routine breast cancer screening examinations: according to Dutch regulations women under 50 are ineligible for them. The present qualitative study rests on and complements three experimental studies on the persuasiveness of mammography information leaflets; it uses interviews to elucidate reasons why the (...)
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