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  1. Marc J. De Vries, Andrew Feenberg, Arne De Boever & Aud Sissel Hoel (forthcoming). Book Symposium on The Philosophy of Simondon: Between Technology and Individuation. Philosophy and Technology:1-26.
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  2. Andrew Feenberg (forthcoming). Review of Moishe Postone, Time, Labor, and Social Domination: A Reinterpretation of Marx's Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press. 424 Pages. ISBN. [REVIEW] Theory and Society.
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  3. Andrew Feenberg (2013). From Psychology to Ontology. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):81-89.
    Marcuse’s philosophy of nature is closely bound up with his concepts of the erotic and the aesthetic. This paper discusses the connection and shows how themes from the early Marx, Heideggerian phenomenology, and Hegel come together in his work. Marcuse’s early writings under the influence of Heidegger focus on the unity of the living human subject and its environment. The later works develop a similar conception in terms of the aesthetic relation to nature and technological transformation.
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  4. Andrew Feenberg (2013). Heidegger and Marcuse: On Reification and Concrete Philosophy'. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury. 171.
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  5. Andrew Feenberg (2013). Marcuse's Phenomenology: Reading Chapter Six of One‐Dimensional Man. Constellations 20 (4):604-614.
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  6. Andrew Feenberg (2013). The Mediation is the Message. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 17 (1):7-24.
    Critical theory of technology brings technology studies to bear on the social theory of rationality. This paper discusses this connection through a reconsideration of the contribution of the Frankfurt School to our understanding of what I call the paradox of rationality, the fact that the promise of the Enlightenment has been disappointed as advances in scientific and technical knowledge have led to more and more catastrophic consequences. The challenge for critical theory is to understand this paradox without romantic and anti-modern (...)
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  7. Andrew Feenberg (2013). What I Said and What I Should Have Said. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 17 (1):163-178.
    In this reply I address problems identified by my critics in my concept of formal bias, my use of phenomenology, the relation between my work and McLuhan’s media theory, and the relation of science to technology.
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  8. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, David Ingram, Sally Wyatt, Yoko Arisaka & Andrew Feenberg (2011). Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):203-226.
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg’s Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity Content Type Journal Article Pages 203-226 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0017-8 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA David B. Ingram, Loyola University Chicago, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626, USA Sally Wyatt, e-Humanities Group, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) & Maastricht University, Cruquiusweg 31, 1019 AT Amsterdam, The Netherlands Yoko Arisaka, Forschungsinstitut für Philosophie Hannover, (...)
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  9. Andrew Feenberg (2011). Modernity, Technology and the Forms of Rationality. Philosophy Compass 6 (12):865-873.
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  10. Dana S. Belu & Andrew Feenberg (2010). Heidegger's Aporetic Ontology of Technology. Inquiry 53 (1):1-19.
    The aim of this inquiry is to investigate Heidegger's ontology of technology. We will show that this ontology is aporetic. In Heidegger's key technical essays, ?The question concerning technology? and its earlier versions ?Enframing? and ?The danger?, enframing is described as the ontological basis of modern life. But the account of enframing is ambiguous. Sometimes it is described as totally binding and at other times it appears to allow for exceptions. This oscillation between, what we will call total enframing and (...)
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  11. Andrew Feenberg (2010). The Critical Theory of Technology. In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  12. Andrew Feenberg (2010). Ten Paradoxes of Technology. Techné 14 (1):3-15.
    Though we may be competent at using many technologies, most of what we think we know about technology in general is false. Our error stems from the everyday conception of things as separate from each other and from us. In reality technologies belong to an interconnected network the nodes of which cannot exist independently qua technologies. What is more we tend to see technologies as quasi-natural objects, but they are just as much social as natural, just as much determined by (...)
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  13. Andrew Feenberg & Michel Callon (2010). Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity. The Mit Press.
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  14. Andrew Feenberg (2009). Ciencia, tecnología y democracia: distinciones y conexiones. Scientiae Studia 7 (1):63-81.
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  15. Andrew Feenberg (2009). Peter-Paul Verbeek: Review of What Things Do. [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (2):225 - 228.
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  16. Andrew Feenberg (2009). Radical Philosophy of Technology. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):199-217.
    The most effective way to silence criticism is a justification on the very terms of the likely critique. When an action is rationally justified, how can reason deny its legitimacy? This paper concerns critical strategies that have been employed for addressing the resistance of rationality to rational critique especially with respectto technology. Foucault addressed this problem in his theory of power/knowledge. This paper explores Marx’s anticipation of that approach in his critique of the “social rationality” of the market and technology. (...)
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  17. Andrew Feenberg (2009). Review: Peter-Paul Verbeek: Review of "What Things Do". [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (2):225 - 228.
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  18. Andrew Feenberg (2009). The May 1968 Archives: A Presentation of the Anti-Technocratic Struggle in May 1968. Phaenex 4 (2):45-59.
    This essay argues that the events of May ’68 were not without substantial political content. Drawing on the May Events Archives at SFU, the author argues that the protests were not a vastly overblown student plank, but represented an important attempt to establish a politics of civilizational identity and to answer the questions: what kind of people are we, and what can we expect as a basic minimum level of justice and equality in our affairs?
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  19. Andrew Feenberg (2009). Technological Rationality and the Problem of Meaning. In Stefano Giacchetti Ludovisi & G. Agostini Saavedra (eds.), Nostalgia for a Redeemed Future: Critical Theory. University of Delaware.
     
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  20. Andrew Feenberg (2008). Comments. Social Epistemology 22 (1):119 – 124.
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  21. Andrew Feenberg (2008). From Critical Theory of Technology to the Rational Critique of Rationality. Social Epistemology 22 (1):5 – 28.
    This paper explores the sense in which modern societies can be said to be rational. Social rationality cannot be understood on the model of an idealized image of scientific method. Neither science nor society conforms to this image. Nevertheless, critique is routinely silenced by neo-liberal and technocratic arguments that appeal to social simulacra of science. This paper develops a critical strategy for addressing the resistance of rationality to rational critique. Romantic rejection of reason has proven less effective than strategies that (...)
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  22. Patrick Feng & Andrew Feenberg (2008). Thinking About Design. In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer. 105.
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  23. Norm Friesen & Andrew Feenberg (2007). 'Ed Tech in Reverse': Information Technologies and the Cognitive Revolution. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (7):720–736.
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  24. Andrew Feenberg (2006). Chapter 12: A Neo-Marxist Critique. Techné 10 (2):112-122.
  25. Andrew Feenberg (2006). Reply to Dahlstrom and Scharff. Techné 9 (3):81-93.
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  26. Andrew Feenberg (2006). Symmetry, Asymmetry, and the Real Possibility of Radical Change: Reply to Kochan. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 37 (4):721-727.
    In his critique of my book Heidegger and Marcuse, Jeff Kochan (2006) asserts that I am committed to the possibility of private knowledge, transcendent truths, and individualism. In this reply I argue that he has misinterpreted my analysis of the Challenger disaster and Marcuse’s work. Because I do not dismiss Roger Boisjoly’s doubts about the Challenger launch, Kochan believes that I have abandoned a social concept of knowledge for a reliance on the private knowledge of a single individual. In fact, (...)
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  27. Andrew Feenberg (2006). What is the Philosophy of Technology? In John R. Dakers (ed.), Defining Technological Literacy: Towards an Epistemological Framework. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  28. Andrew Feenberg (2005). Heidegger and Marcuse: The Catastrophe and Redemption of History. Routledge.
    CHAPTER Techne Prologue with Plato and Aristotle Heidegger and Marcuse We are several hundred years into the project of Enlightenment, initiated in the ...
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  29. Andrew Feenberg (2005). The Technical Codes of Online Education. Techné 9 (1):97-123.
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  30. Andrew Feenberg (2004). Heidegger and Marcuse : The Catastrophe and Redemption of Technology. In John Abromeit & W. Mark Cobb (eds.), Herbert Marcuse: A Critical Reader. Routledge.
    First published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  31. Andrew Feenberg (2003). Active and Passive Bodies. Techné 7 (2):125-130.
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  32. Andrew Feenberg (2003). Pragmatism and Critical Theory of Technology. Techné 7 (1):29-33.
  33. Andrew Feenberg (2002). Transforming Technology: A Critical Theory Revisited. Oxford University Press.
    Thoroughly revised, this new edition of Critical Theory of Technology rethinks the relationships between technology, rationality, and democracy, arguing that the degradation of labor--as well as of many environmental, educational, and political systems--is rooted in the social values that preside over technological development. It contains materials on political theory, but the emphasis has shifted to reflect a growing interest in the fields of technology and cultural studies.
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  34. Maria Bakardjieva & Andrew Feenberg (2001). Involving the Virtual Subject. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):233-240.
    As users of computer networks have become more active in producing their own electronic records, in the form of transcripts of onlinediscussions, ethicists have attempted to interpret this new situation interms of earlier models of personal data protection. But thistransference results in unprecedented problems for researchers. Thispaper examines some of the central dichotomies and paradoxes in thedebate on research ethics online in the context of the concrete study ofa virtual community that we carried out. We argue that alienation, notprivacy, is (...)
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  35. Andrew Feenberg (2001). Democratizing Technology: Interests, Codes, Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 5 (2):177-195.
    This reply to criticism of Questioning Technology by Gerald Doppeltaddresses differences between political philosophy and philosophy oftechnology. While political philosophers such as Doppelt emphasize procedural aspects of democracy and equal rights, many philosophers of technologyimplicitly assume a substantive criterion of the good centered on thedevelopment of human capacities. Questioning Technology alsoemphasizes the diminishing agency of individuals in technologically advanced societies dominated by large scale organizations and themass media. These themes of social critique complement the main focusof political philosophy. Political philosophy (...)
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  36. Andrew Feenberg (2000). Constructivism and Technology Critique: Replies to Critics. Inquiry 43 (2):225 – 237.
    1. Thomson's critique: Despite the efforts of his followers to show that Heidegger had a progressive theory of technology, his work is clouded by nostalgia. His positive contribution is a fragmentary opening toward a phenomenology of daily technical practice, which I use to develop de Certeau's distinction between the strategic control of technical systems and their tactical usage by subordinates. Heidegger himself made no such application of his own phenomenological approach. 2. Stump's critique: Can an ontological essentialism and a historically (...)
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  37. Andrew Feenberg (2000). The Ontic and the Ontological in Heidegger's Philosophy of Technology: Response to Thomson. Inquiry 43 (4):445 – 450.
    Iain Thomson's critique is persuasive on several points but not on the major issue, the relation of the ontological to the ontic in Heidegger's philosophy of technology. This reply attempts to show that these two dimensions of Heidegger's theory are closely related, at least in the technological domain, and not separate, as Thomson affirms. It is argued that Heidegger's evaluations of particular technologies, the flaws of which Thomson concedes, proceed from a flawed ontological conception.
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  38. Andrew Feenberg (1999). Civilizational Politics and Dissenting Individuals: A Comment on Martin Matuštík's Specters of Liberation. Radical Philosophy Review 2 (2):152-160.
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  39. Andrew Feenberg (1999). Experience and Culture: Nishida's Path "to the Things Themselves". Philosophy East and West 49 (1):28-44.
    The word "experience" refers to at least four different concepts: empirical experience, lived experience, experience as Bildung, and the domain of pure consciousness prior to the division of subject and object. All these concepts of experience are at work in the thought of Nishida Kitarō, where they take on a specific historical and political character in response to the situation of Japan in the world system.
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  40. Andrew Feenberg (1999). Questioning Technology. Routledge.
    In this extraordinary introduction to the study of the philosophy of technology, Andrew Feenberg argues that techonological design is central to the social and political structure of modern societies. Environmentalism, information technology, and medical advances testify to technology's crucial importance. In his lucid and engaging style, Feenberg shows that technology is the medium of daily life. Every major technical changes reverberates at countless levels: economic, political, and cultural. If we continue to see the social and technical domains as being seperate, (...)
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  41. Margaret Andersen, Brian M. Downing, Steven Epstein, K. Peter Etzkorn, Andrew Feenberg, John Foran, Roger Friedland, Nehemia Geva, Bob Holton & Richard Lachmann (1996). Acknowledgment of Outside Reviewers for 1995. Theory and Society 25:155.
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  42. Andrew Feenberg (1996). Marcuse or Habermas: Two Critiques of Technology. Inquiry 39 (1):45 – 70.
    The debate between Marcuse and Habermas over technology marked a significant turning point in the history of the Frankfurt School. After the 1960s Habermas's influence grew as Marcuse's declined and Critical Theory adopted a far less Utopian stance. Recently there has been a revival of quite radical technology criticism in the environmental movement and under the influence of Foucault and constructivism. This article takes a new look at the earlier debate from the standpoint of these recent developments. While much of (...)
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  43. Andrew Feenberg (1996). The Commoner-Ehrlich Debate: Environmentalism and the Politics of Survival. In David Macauley (ed.), Minding Nature: The Philosophers of Ecology. Guilford Press.
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  44. Andrew Feenberg & Alastair Hannay (eds.) (1995). Technology and the Politics of Knowledge. Indiana University Press.
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  45. Eric A. Weiss, Justin Leiber, Judith Felson Duchan, Mallory Selfridge, Eric Dietrich, Peter A. Facione, Timothy Joseph Day, Johan M. Lammens, Andrew Feenberg, Deborah G. Johnson, Daniel S. Levine & Ted A. Warfield (1995). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (1):109-155.
  46. Andrew Feenberg (1994). The Technocracy Thesis Revisited: On the Critique of Power. Inquiry 37 (1):85 – 102.
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  47. Andrew Feenberg (1992). On Being a Human Subject: Interest and Obligation in the Experimental Treatment of Incurable Disease. Philosophical Forum 23 (3):213-230.
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  48. Andrew Feenberg (1992). Subversive Rationalization: Technology, Power, and Democracy. Inquiry 35 (3 & 4):301 – 322.
    This paper argues, against technological and economic determinism, that the dominant model of industrial society is politically contingent. The idea that technical decisions are significantly constrained by ?rationality? ? either technical or economic ? is shown to be groundless. Constructivist and hermeneutic approaches to technology show that modern societies are inherently available for a different type of development in a different cultural framework. It is possible that, in the future, those who today are subordinated to technology's rhythms and demands will (...)
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  49. Andrew Feenberg (1991). Critical Theory of Technology. Oxford University Press.
    Modern technology is more than a neutral tool: it is the framework of our civilization and shapes our way of life. Social critics claim that we must choose between this way of life and human values. Critical Theory of Technology challenges that pessimistic cliche. This pathbreaking book argues that the roots of the degradation of labor, education, and the environment lie not in technology per se but in the cultural values embodied in its design. Rejecting such popular solutions as economic (...)
     
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  50. Andrew Feenberg (1990). Post-Industrial Discourses. Theory and Society 19 (6):709-737.
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