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  1. Arthur L. Caplan (forthcoming). Case Study: The Mother of All Case Studies. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  2. Arthur L. Caplan (forthcoming). Moving the Womb: The Ethics of Uterine Transplants. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  3. Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr & James J. McCartney (forthcoming). Used, and Are Used, as Invectives: Their Aim is to Degrade—and, Hence, Socially Constrain—the Person Diagnosed." Laing Makes the Same Objection in Numerous Places in His Work Eg, The Politics of Experience, Pp. 121-2. [REVIEW] Bioethics.
     
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  4. Scott D. Halpern, Peter A. Ubel & Arthur L. Caplan (forthcoming). Solid-Organ Transplantation in HIV-Infected Patients. Center for Bioethics Papers.
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  5. Carol Levine & Arthur L. Caplan (forthcoming). Beyond Localism: A Proposal for a National Research Review Board. Irb.
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  6. Arthur L. Caplan (2013). It Is Not Morally Acceptable to Buy and Sell Organs for Human Transplantation. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons. 25--59.
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  7. Arthur L. Caplan (2013). Reply to Cherry. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons. 25--70.
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  8. Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.) (2013). Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons.
    Are there universal ethical principles that should govern the conduct of medicine and research worldwide? -- Is it morally acceptable to buy and sell organs for human transplantation? -- Were it physically safe, would human reproductive cloning be acceptable? -- Is the deliberately induced abortion of a human pregnancy ethically justifiable? -- Is it ethical to patent or copyright genes, embryos, or their parts? -- Should minors have the right to refuse treatment, even when against the will of their parents (...)
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  9. Kyle Powys Whyte, Evan Selinger, Arthur L. Caplan & Jathan Sadowski (2012). Nudge, Nudge or Shove, Shove—The Right Way for Nudges to Increase the Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):32-39.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein (2008) contend that mandated choice is the most practical nudge for increasing organ donation. We argue that they are wrong, and their mistake results from failing to appreciate how perceptions of meaning can influence people's responses to nudges. We favor a policy of default to donation that is subject to immediate family veto power, includes options for people to opt out (and be educated on how to do so), and emphasizes the role of organ procurement (...)
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  10. Arthur L. Caplan (2010). Can Bioethics Transcend Ideology? (And Should It?). In Jonathan D. Moreno & Sam Berger (eds.), Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics. Mit Press.
     
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  11. Arthur L. Caplan (2010). Can Bioethics Transcend Ideology?(And. In Jonathan D. Moreno & Sam Berger (eds.), Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics. Mit Press. 219.
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  12. Arthur L. Caplan (2010). Good, Better, or Best? In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oup Oxford.
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  13. Arthur L. Caplan (2010). Rethinking Life. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 1 (1):77-78.
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  14. Jon F. Merz, Arthur L. Caplan & Dana Katz (2010). All Gifts Large and Small: Toward an Understanding of the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Industry Gift-Giving. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):11-17.
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  15. Arthur L. Caplan (2009). Good, Better or Best. In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oup Oxford. 199--209.
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  16. Arthur L. Caplan (2009). T He Origins Of. In Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.), The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company. 1.
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  17. Arthur L. Caplan (2009). The Rise of Anti-Meliorism. In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oup Oxford. 199.
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  18. Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.) (2009). The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company.
    This book will also inform the general public, patients, and family members as they seek answers to the bioethical issues of the day.
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  19. Robert I. Field & Arthur L. Caplan (2008). A Proposed Ethical Framework for Vaccine Mandates: Competing Values and the Case of HPV. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):111-124.
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  20. Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis, Martin L. Smith, Nicholas Agar, Jacob M. Appel, David Benatar, Nancy Berlinger, Daniel Brudney, Lucy M. Candib & Arthur L. Caplan (2007). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 37 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2007. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 37 (2007) and May Be Purchased for $16.00 Each, Plus Shipping. Please Contact the Circulation Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 37.
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  21. Arthur L. Caplan & Edward J. Bergman (2007). Beyond Schiavo. Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):340.
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  22. Arthur L. Caplan & David R. Curry (2007). Leveraging Genetic Resources or Moral Blackmail? Indonesia and Avian Flu Virus Sample Sharing. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):1 – 2.
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  23. Arthur L. Caplan & Thomas A. Marino (2007). The Role of Scientists in the Beginning-of-Life Debate: A 25-Year Retrospective. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):603-613.
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  24. Arthur L. Caplan, Constance Marie Perry, Lauren A. Plante, Joseph Saloma & Frances R. Batzer (2007). Moving the Womb. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):18-20.
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  25. Arthur L. Caplan (2006). No Method, Thus Madness? Hastings Center Report 36 (2):12-13.
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  26. Arthur L. Caplan (2006). Talking Through Your Epistemological Hat-Reply. Hastings Center Report 36 (4):8-8.
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  27. Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.
     
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  28. Louis W. Hodges, Mark Douglas, Rick Kenney, Christine Dellert & Arthur L. Caplan (2006). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2 & 3):215 – 228.
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  29. Arthur L. Caplan (2005). "Who Lost China?" A Foreshadowing of Today's Ideological Disputes in Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 35 (3):12-13.
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  30. Barbara K. Redman & Arthur L. Caplan (2005). Off with Their Heads: The Need to Criminalize Some Forms of Scientific Misconduct. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):345-346.
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  31. Arthur L. Caplan (2004). Organs.Com: New Commercially Brokered Organ Transfers Raise Questions. Hastings Center Report 34 (6):8.
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  32. Arthur L. Caplan (2004). What's Morally Wrong with Eugenics. In Arthur Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), Health, Disease, and Illness: Concepts in Medicine. Georgetown University Press.
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  33. Arthur L. Caplan & David Magnus (2003). New Life Forms: New Threats, New Possibilities. Hastings Center Report 33 (7).
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  34. Dana Katz, Arthur L. Caplan & Jon F. Merz (2003). All Gifts Large and Small. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):39-46.
    Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social sciences suggests that gifts of negligible value can influence the behavior of the recipient in ways the recipient does not always realize. (...)
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  35. Dana Katz, Arthur L. Caplan & Jon F. Merz (2003). A Response to Commentators on "All Gifts Large and Small". American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):63-63.
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  36. David A. Asch, Jeffrey R. Botkin, Katrina A. Bramstedt, Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, D. Micah Hester, Kenneth V. Iserson & Mark G. Kuczewski (2002). Bette Anton, MLS, is the Head Librarian of the Optometry Library/Health Sciences Information Service. This Library Serves the University of California at Berkeley–University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program and the University of California at Berkeley School of Optometry. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11:4-5.
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  37. Arthur L. Caplan (2002). Review of Our Posthuman Future_, _The Future Is Now: America Confronts the New Genetics_, and _Redesigning Humans: Our Inevitable Genetic Future. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):57-61.
    (2002). Review of Our Posthuman Future, The Future Is Now: America Confronts the New Genetics, and Redesigning Humans: Our Inevitable Genetic Future. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 57-61.
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  38. Glenn Mcgee, Joshua P. Spanogle, Arthur L. Caplan, Dina Penny & David A. Asch (2002). Successes and Failures of Hospital Ethics Committees: A National Survey of Ethics Committee Chairs. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):87-93.
    In 1992, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) passed a mandate that all its approved hospitals put in place a means for addressing ethical concerns.Although the particular process the hospital uses to address such concernsmay vary, the hospital or healthcare ethics committee (HEC) is used most often. In a companion study to that reported here, we found that in 1998 over 90% of U.S. hospitals had ethics committees, compared to just 1% in 1983, and that many (...)
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  39. Glenn McGee, Joshua P. Spanogle, Arthur L. Caplan & David A. Asch (2001). A National Study of Ethics Committees. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):60-64.
    Conceived as a solution to clinical dilemmas, and now required by organizations for hospital accreditation, ethics committees have been subject only to small-scale studies. The wide use of ethics committees and the diverse roles they play compel study. In 1999 the University of Pennsylvania Ethics Committee Research Group (ECRG) completed the first national survey of the presence, composition, and activities of U.S. healthcare ethics committees (HECs). Ethics committees are relatively young, on average seven years in operation. Eighty-six percent of ethics (...)
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  40. Dominic A. Sisti & Arthur L. Caplan (2001). Help Wanted: Entrepreneurs Needed to Serve Bioethics' Outsiders. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):48-49.
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  41. Glenn McGee & Arthur L. Caplan (1999). The Ethics and Politics of Small Sacrifices in Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):151-158.
    : Pluripotent human stem cell research may offer new treatments for hundreds of diseases, but opponents of this research argue that such therapy comes attached to a Faustian bargain: cures at the cost of the destruction of many frozen embryos. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), government officials, and many scholars of bioethics, including, in these pages, John Robertson, have not offered an adequate response to ethical objections to stem cell research. Instead of examining the ethical issues involved in sacrificing (...)
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  42. Glenn Mcgee & Arthur L. Caplan (1999). What's in the Dish? Hastings Center Report 29 (2):36-38.
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  43. Peter A. Ubel & Arthur L. Caplan (1999). Jonathan Baron and David A. Asch “A Report From the USA: Social Responsibility, Personal Responsibility, and Prognosis in Public Judgements About Transplant Allocation.”. [REVIEW] Bioethics 13:57-68.
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  44. Arthur L. Caplan (1998). What's So Special About the Human Genome? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):422-424.
    Glenn McGee argues that the time is now for debating the morality of patenting human genes. In one sense he is surely right. While thousands of patents have been issued or are pending on many gene sequences, public policy with respect to ownership of the human genome is still far from settled. So a debate about the ethics of patenting genes is, if nothing else, timely. In another sense however, Professor McGee is wrong.
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  45. Arthur L. Caplan (1998). Am I My Brother's Keeper? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (4):605.
     
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  46. Arthur L. Caplan (1998). Wearing Your Organ Transplant on Your Sleeve. Hastings Center Report 29 (2):52-52.
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  47. Arthur L. Caplan, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Mildred K. Cho, Steve Heilig, John Hubert, Kenneth V. Iserson, Tom Koch & Mark G. Kuczewski (1998). David Buehler, M. Div., MA, is Founder of Bioethika Online Publishers and Also Serves as Chaplain to the University Lutheran Ministry of Providence, Rhode Island. Michael M. Burgess, Ph. D., is Chair in Biomedical Ethics, Centre for Applied Ethics at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:335-336.
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  48. Arthur L. Caplan (1996). Book Review:The Least Worst Death: Essays in Bioethics on the End of Life. Margaret Pabst Battin. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (4):876-.
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  49. Arthur L. Caplan & Lynn Gillam (1996). When Medicine Went Mad: Bioethics and the Holocaust. Bioethics-Oxford 10 (2):180-181.
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  50. Jared Goldstein & Arthur L. Caplan (1996). The Mother of All Case Studies. Hastings Center Report 26 (1):23.
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