Search results for 'English language Semantics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Chris Sinha, Lis A. Thorseng, Mariko Hayashi & Kim Plunkett (1994). Comparative Spatial Semantics and Language Acquisition: Evidence From Danish, English, and Japanese. Journal of Semantics 11 (4):253-287.score: 333.0
    Spatial relational meaning is typically predominantly expressed in English and related languages by die locative particle system. Even between closely related languages such as Danish and English, there are substantial differences with respect to both the semantics and the morphology of locative particles. Other languages (including Japanese), although they may use locative particles in spatial relational expression, distribute spatial relational meaning quite differendy between and within form classes. We investigate the consequences of these differences for the acquisition (...)
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  2. Gustaf Stern (1975). Meaning and Change of Meaning: With Special Reference to the English Language. Greenwood Press.score: 306.0
     
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  3. Grzegorz Kleparski (1997). Theory and Practice of Historical Semantics: The Case of Middle English and Early Modern English Synonyms of Girl/Young Women. University Press of the Catholic University of Lublin.score: 288.0
     
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  4. Beata Kopecka, Marta Pikor-Niedziałek, Agnieszka Uberman & Grzegorz Kleparski (eds.) (2012). Galicia Studies in Language: Historical Semantics Brought to the Fore. Wydawn. Tawa.score: 288.0
     
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  5. Torben Thrane (1980). Referential-Semantic Analysis: Aspects of a Theory of Linguistic Reference. Cambridge University Press.score: 276.0
    Dr Thrane makes an original contribution to one of the central topics in syntax and semantics: the nature and mechanisms of reference in natural language. He makes a fundamental distinction between syntactic analyses that are internal to the structure of a language and analyses of the referential properties that connect a language with the 'outside world' - and therefore derive in some sense from common human capacities for perceptual discrimination. Dr Thrane argues that the failure to (...)
     
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  6. Douglas J. Wulf (2009). Two New Challenges for the Modal Account of the Progressive. Natural Language Semantics 17 (3):205-218.score: 252.0
    The progressive in English appears to be inherently modal, due to what Dowty (Word meaning and Montague grammar: The semantics of verbs and times in generative semantics and in Montague’s PTQ, 1979) terms the imperfective paradox. In truth-conditional accounts, the literal truth of a clause with the modal progressive hinges on the possibility of the described outcome. The clause’s truth under such accounts has also been tacitly assumed to describe its felicitous use. Two challenges for this strategy (...)
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  7. Kathryn Allan & Justyna A. Robinson (eds.) (2011). Current Methods in Historical Semantics. De Gruyter Mouton.score: 207.0
     
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  8. Marcin Grygiel (2007). Main Trends in Historical Semantics. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Rzeszowskiego.score: 207.0
     
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  9. Waldemar Skrzypczak (2006). Analog-Based Modelling of Meaning Representations in English. Nicolaus Copernicus University Press.score: 207.0
     
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  10. Leila Behrens (1999). Qualities, Objects, Sorts, and Other Treasures: Gold-Digging in English and Arabic. Kölnuniversität Zu Köln, Institut für Sprachwissenschaft.score: 201.0
     
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  11. Bożena Rozwadowska (1992). Thematic Constraints on Selected Constructions in English and Polish. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego.score: 201.0
     
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  12. Geoffrey K. Pullum & Kyle Rawlins (2007). Argument or No Argument? Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (2):277 - 287.score: 198.0
    We examine an argument for the non-context-freeness of English that has received virtually no discussion in the literature. It is based on adjuncts of the form ‘X or no X’, where X is a nominal. The construction has been held to exemplify unbounded syntactic reduplication. We argue that although the argument can be made in a mathematically valid form, its empirical basis is not claimed unbounded syntactic identity between nominals does not always hold in attested cases, and second, an (...)
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  13. Ian Pratt-Hartmann (2004). Fragments of Language. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13 (2):207-223.score: 189.0
    By a fragment of a natural language we mean a subset of thatlanguage equipped with semantics which translate its sentences intosome formal system such as first-order logic. The familiar conceptsof satisfiability and entailment can be defined for anysuch fragment in a natural way. The question therefore arises, for anygiven fragment of a natural language, as to the computational complexityof determining satisfiability and entailment within that fragment. Wepresent a series of fragments of English for which the satisfiabilityproblem (...)
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  14. Maria Cristobal (2001). Arriving Events in English and Spanish : A Contrastive Analysis in Terms of Frame Semantics. Analysis 510:1-77.score: 189.0
    This paper presents a detailed contrastive frame semantic analysis of arriving events in English and Spanish, attested through a corpus study. The framework and methodology of our research follows the FrameNet II Research Project housed at ICSI. First, we present a formal description of the Arriving frame as a subframe of the Motion frame: arriving encodes a basic subpart of our conceptualization of motion, namely the transition from moving to arriving at a goal. Second, we carry out a cross-linguistic (...)
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  15. Ewa Mioduszewska (1992). Conventional Implicature and Semantic Theory. Wydawnictwa Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego.score: 189.0
     
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  16. Paul Ziff (1960). Semantic Analysis. Ithaca, N.Y.,Cornell University Press.score: 189.0
     
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  17. Soonja Choi & Kate Hattrup (2012). Relative Contribution of Perception/Cognition and Language on Spatial Categorization. Cognitive Science 36 (1):102-129.score: 180.0
    This study investigated the relative contribution of perception/cognition and language-specific semantics in nonverbal categorization of spatial relations. English and Korean speakers completed a video-based similarity judgment task involving containment, support, tight fit, and loose fit. Both perception/cognition and language served as resources for categorization, and allocation between the two depended on the target relation and the features contrasted in the choices. Whereas perceptual/cognitive salience for containment and tight-fit features guided categorization in many contexts, language-specific (...) influenced categorization where the two features competed for similarity judgment and when the target relation was tight support, a domain where spatial relations are perceptually diverse. In the latter contexts, each group categorized more in line with semantics of their language, that is, containment/support for English and tight/loose fit for Korean. We conclude that language guides spatial categorization when perception/cognition alone is not sufficient. In this way, language is an integral part of our cognitive domain of space. (shrink)
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  18. Ki-sŏng Pak (2009). Yŏngŏ Wa Han'gugŏ Ŭimiron Pigyo Yŏn'gu: Iron Kwa Silche. Tongin.score: 180.0
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  19. Karl Reuning (1941). Joy and Freude. Swarthmore, Pa.,Distributed by the Swarthmore College Bookstore.score: 180.0
     
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  20. Gustaf Stern (1931/1964). Meaning and Change of Meaning. Bloomington, Indiana University Press.score: 180.0
     
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  21. Jeffrey Lidz & Sandra Waxman (2004). Reaffirming the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument: A Reply to the Replies. Cognition 93 (2):157-165.score: 174.0
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  22. William J. Greenberg (1985). Aspects of a Theory of Singular Reference: Prolegomena to a Dialectical Logic of Singular Terms. Garland Pub..score: 174.0
  23. P. Pauwels (2000). Put, Set, Lay, and Place: A Cognitve Linguistic Approach to Verbal Meaning. Lincom Europa.score: 174.0
     
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  24. Luqi Wu & Michael McMahon (forthcoming). Adopting a Musical Intelligence and E-Learning Approach to Improve the English Language Pronunciation of Chinese Students. AI and Society:1-10.score: 168.0
    This study investigates the use of musical intelligence to improve the English pronunciation of Chinese third level students. It is relevant for a human-centred systems engineering approach to cross-cultural interaction. Language learning is important as valid communication can help interactions and cultural understanding between countries, this also may benefit international stability. There are natural barriers between the English and Chinese language which are reflected in teaching approaches. The teaching of English in Chinese classrooms is removed (...)
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  25. Lisa Matthewson (2006). Temporal Semantics in a Superficially Tenseless Language. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (6):673 - 713.score: 165.0
    This paper contributes to the debate about ‘tenseless languages’ by defending a tensed analysis of a superficially tenseless language. The language investigated is St’át’imcets (Lillooet Salish). I argue that although St’át’imcets lacks overt tense morphology, every finite clause in the language possesses a phonologically covert tense morpheme; this tense morpheme restricts the reference time to being non-future. Future interpretations, as well as ‘past future’ would-readings, are obtained by the combination of covert tense with an operator analogous to (...)
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  26. Noah Constant (2012). English Rise-Fall-Rise: A Study in the Semantics and Pragmatics of Intonation. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (5):407-442.score: 159.0
    This paper provides a semantic analysis of English rise-fall-rise (RFR) intonation as a focus quantifier over assertable alternative propositions. I locate RFR meaning in the conventional implicature dimension, and propose that its effect is calculated late within a dynamic model. With a minimum of machinery, this account captures disambiguation and scalar effects, as well as interactions with other focus operators like ‘only’ and clefts. Double focus data further support the analysis, and lead to a rejection of Ward and Hirschberg’s (...)
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  27. Miklós Erdélyi-Szabó, László Kálmán & Agi Kurucz (2008). Towards a Natural Language Semantics Without Functors and Operands. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (1):1-17.score: 158.0
    The paper sets out to offer an alternative to the function/argument approach to the most essential aspects of natural language meanings. That is, we question the assumption that semantic completeness (of, e.g., propositions) or incompleteness (of, e.g., predicates) exactly replicate the corresponding grammatical concepts (of, e.g., sentences and verbs, respectively). We argue that even if one gives up this assumption, it is still possible to keep the compositionality of the semantic interpretation of simple predicate/argument structures. In our opinion, compositionality (...)
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  28. Nissim Francez & Roy Dyckhoff (2010). Proof-Theoretic Semantics for a Natural Language Fragment. Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (6):447-477.score: 144.0
    The paper presents a proof-theoretic semantics (PTS) for a fragment of natural language, providing an alternative to the traditional model-theoretic (Montagovian) semantics (MTS), whereby meanings are truth-condition (in arbitrary models). Instead, meanings are taken as derivability-conditions in a dedicated natural-deduction (ND) proof-system. This semantics is effective (algorithmically decidable), adhering to the meaning as use paradigm, not suffering from several of the criticisms formulated by philosophers of language against MTS as a theory of meaning. In particular, (...)
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  29. Frans Plank (1984). Verbs and Objects in Semantic Agreement: Minor Differences Between English and German That Might Suggest a Major One. Journal of Semantics 3 (4):305-360.score: 144.0
    Even though not boasting overt and systematically used noun classifiers of the variety known as classificatory verbs, languages may still have predicates (co-)signalling particular categories of nominal classification (outside syntactic agreement). Standard examples are English verbs such as to bark/neigh/gallop requiring subjects which refer to particular animals, or otherwise classify their subject referents a being in the relevant respects comparable to the animals in question. I hope to demonstrate in this paper that semantic agreement of this kind, which has (...)
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  30. K. Schulz (2014). Fake Tense in Conditional Sentences: A Modal Approach. Natural Language Semantics 22 (2):117-144.score: 141.0
    Many languages allow for “fake” uses of their past tense marker: the marker: can occur in certain contexts without conveying temporal pastness. Instead it appears to bear a modal meaning. Iatridou (Linguist Inq 31(2):231–270, 2000) has dubbed this phenomenon Fake Tense. Fake Tense is particularly common to conditional constructions. This paper analyzes Fake Tense in English conditional sentences as a certain kind of ambiguity: the past tense morphology can mark the presence of a temporal operator, but it can also (...)
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  31. Paul Ibbotson (2013). The Role of Semantics, Pre-Emption and Skew in Linguistic Distributions: The Case of the Un-Construction. Frontiers in Psychology 4:989.score: 132.0
    We use the Google Ngram database, a corpus of 5,195,769 digitized books containing ~4% of all books ever published, to test three ideas that are hypothesized to account for linguistic generalizations: verbal semantics, pre-emption and skew. Using 828,813 tokens of un-forms as a test case for these mechanisms, we found verbal semantics was a good predictor of the frequency of un-forms in the English language over the past 200 years – both in terms of how the (...)
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  32. Michel Pêcheux (1982). Language, Semantics, and Ideology. St. Martin's Press.score: 132.0
  33. Camilo Thorne & Diego Calvanese (2012). Tractability and Intractability of Controlled Languages for Data Access. Studia Logica 100 (4):787-813.score: 130.0
    In this paper we study the semantic data complexity of several controlled fragments of English designed for natural language front-ends to OWL (Web Ontology Language) and description logic ontology-based systems. Controlled languages are fragments of natural languages, obtained by restricting natural language syntax, vocabulary and semantics with the goal of eliminating ambiguity. Semantic complexity arises from the formal logic modelling of meaning in natural language and fragments thereof. It can be characterized as the computational (...)
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  34. Giorgio Magri (2009). A Theory of Individual-Level Predicates Based on Blind Mandatory Scalar Implicatures. Natural Language Semantics 17 (3):245-297.score: 129.0
    Predicates such as tall or to know Latin, which intuitively denote permanent properties, are called individual-level predicates. Many peculiar properties of this class of predicates have been noted in the literature. One such property is that we cannot say #John is sometimes tall. Here is a way to account for this property: this sentence sounds odd because it triggers the scalar implicature that the alternative John is always tall is false, which cannot be, given that, if John is sometimes tall, (...)
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  35. G. Grossi, N. Savill, E. Thomas & G. Thierry (2011). Electrophysiological Cross-Language Neighborhood Density Effects in Late and Early English-Welsh Bilinguals. Frontiers in Psychology 3:408-408.score: 127.0
    Behavioral studies with proficient late bilinguals have revealed the existence of orthographic neighborhood density effects across languages when participants read either in their first (L1) or second (L2) language. Words with many cross-language neighbors have been found to elicit more negative event-related potentials (ERPs) than words with few cross-language neighbors (Midgley et al., 2008); the effect started earlier, and was larger, for L2 words. Here, 14 late and 14 early English-Welsh bilinguals performed a semantic categorization task (...)
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  36. William B. Starr, A Preference Semantics for Imperatives.score: 126.0
    There is a rich canon of work on the meaning of imperative sentences, e.g. "Dance!", in philosophy and much recent research in linguistics has made its own exciting advances. However, in this paper I argue that three observations about English imperatives are problematic for approaches from both traditions. In response, I offer a new analysis according to which the meaning of an imperative is identified with the characteristic effect its uses have on the agents’ attitudes. More specifically: an imperative’s (...)
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  37. Tim Crane (1990). The Language of Thought: No Syntax Without Semantics. Mind and Language 5 (3):187-213.score: 126.0
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  38. Robin Cooper, Is English Really a Formal Language?score: 126.0
    • languages as sets of strings and early transformational grammar • interpreted languages as sets of string-meaning pairs • Montague in ‘Universal Grammar’: There is in my opinion no important theoretical difference between natural languages and the artificial languages of logicians; indeed I consider it possible to comprehend the syntax and semantics of both kinds of languages within a single natural and mathematically precise theory.
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  39. Stephen Crain, At the Semantics/Pragmatics Interface in Child Language.score: 126.0
    This paper investigates scalar implicatures and downward entailment in child English. In previous experimental work we have shown that adults’ computation of scalar implicatures is sensitive to entailment relations. For instance, when the disjunction operator or occurs in positive contexts, an implicature of exclusivity arises. By contrast when the disjunction operator occurs within the scope of a downward entailing linguistic expression, no implicature of exclusivity is computed. Investigations on children’s computation of scalar implicatures in the same contexts have led (...)
     
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  40. Petr Sgall (ed.) (1984). Contributions to Functional Syntax, Semantics, and Language Comprehension. J. Benjamins Pub. Co..score: 126.0
    On the Notion "Type of Language" Petr Sgall It is well known that the high frequency of terminological vagueness and confusion has been a serious obstacle ...
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  41. Ian Pratt-Hartmann & Allan Third (2006). More Fragments of Language. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 47 (2):151-177.score: 126.0
    By a fragment of a natural language, we understand a collection of sentences forming a naturally delineated subset of that language and equipped with a semantics commanding the general assent of its native speakers. By the semantic complexity of such a fragment, we understand the computational complexity of deciding whether any given set of sentences in that fragment represents a logically possible situation. In earlier papers by the first author, the semantic complexity of various fragments of (...) involving at most transitive verbs was investigated. The present paper considers various fragments of English involving ditransitive verbs and determines their semantic complexity. (shrink)
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  42. Luisa Meronia, At the Semantics/Pragmatics Interface in Child Language.score: 126.0
    This paper investigates scalar implicatures and downward entailment in child English. In previous experimental work we have shown that adults’ computation of scalar implicatures is sensitive to entailment relations. For instance, when the disjunction operator or occurs in positive contexts, an implicature of exclusivity arises. By contrast when the disjunction operator occurs within the scope of a downward entailing linguistic expression, no implicature of exclusivity is computed. Investigations on children’s computation of scalar implicatures in the same contexts have led (...)
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  43. Harry C. Bunt (1985). Mass Terms and Model-Theoretic Semantics. Cambridge University Press.score: 126.0
    'Mass terms', words like water, rice and traffic, have proved very difficult to accommodate in any theory of meaning since, unlike count nouns such as house or dog, they cannot be viewed as part of a logical set and differ in their grammatical properties. In this study, motivated by the need to design a computer program for understanding natural language utterances incorporating mass terms, Harry Bunt provides a thorough analysis of the problem and offers an original and detailed solution. (...)
     
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  44. Utpal Lahiri (1998). Focus and Negative Polarity in Hindi. Natural Language Semantics 6 (1):57-123.score: 123.0
    This paper presents an analysis of negative polarity items (NPIs) in Hindi. It is noted that NPIs in this language are composed of a (weak) indefinite plus a particle bhii meaning ‘even’. It is argued that the compositional semantics of this combination explains their behavior as NPIs as well as their behavior as free choice (FC) items. I assume that weak Hindi indefinites like ek and koi are to be viewed as a predicate that I call one, a (...)
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  45. Donald Davidson & Gilbert Harman (1970/1977). Semantics of Natural Language. Synthese 22 (1-2):1-2.score: 120.0
  46. Robert D. Rupert (1998). On the Relationship Between Naturalistic Semantics and Individuation Criteria for Terms in a Language of Thought. Synthese 117 (1):95-131.score: 120.0
    Naturalistically minded philosophers hope to identify a privileged nonsemantic relation that holds between a mental representation m and that which m represents, a relation whose privileged status underwrites the assignment of reference to m. The naturalist can accomplish this task only if she has in hand a nonsemantic criterion for individuating mental representations: it would be question-begging for the naturalist to characterize m, for the purpose of assigning content, as 'the representation with such and such content'. If we individuate mental (...)
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  47. Seth Cable (2013). Beyond the Past, Present, and Future: Towards the Semantics of 'Graded Tense' in Gĩkũyũ. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 21 (3):219-276.score: 120.0
    In recent years, our understanding of how tense systems vary across languages has been greatly advanced by formal semantic study of languages exhibiting fewer tense categories than the three commonly found in European languages. However, it has also often been reported that languages can sometimes distinguish more than three tenses. Such languages appear to have ‘graded tense’ systems, where the tense morphology serves to track how far into the past or future a reported event occurs. This paper presents a formal (...)
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  48. Gennaro Chierchia (1998). Reference to Kinds Across Language. Natural Language Semantics 6 (4):339-405.score: 120.0
    This paper is devoted to the study of bare nominal arguments (i.e., determinerless NPs occurring in canonical argumental positions) from a crosslinguistic point of view. It is proposed that languages may vary in what they let their NPs denote. In some languages (like Chinese), NPs are argumental (names of kinds) and can thus occur freely without determiner in argument position; in others they are predicates (Romance), and this prevents NPs from occurring as arguments, unless the category D(eterminer) is projected. Finally, (...)
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  49. Bishnupada[from old catalog] Bhattacharya (1962). A Study in Language and Meaning: A Critical Examination of Some Aspects of Indian Semantics. Calcutta, Progressive Publishers.score: 120.0
     
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  50. Edward L. Keenan (ed.) (1975). Formal Semantics of Natural Language: Papers From a Colloquium Sponsored by the King's College Research Centre, Cambridge. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
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