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Summary Paul Grice coined the term 'implicature' and the two sub-categories of it: conventional implicature and conversational implicature. Implicatures are what a speaker meant in addition to or instead of what was literally said. This leaf contains any papers on implicature that are general in nature or not according to Grice's typology.
Key works Bianchi 2013 examines "the explicit/implicit distinction, the Gricean notion of implicature (conventional and conversational) and its recent developments and connections with the speaker's intentions, communicative responsibility and rationality." 
Introductions Chierchia & Fox unknown Bianchi 2013  Meronib ms
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  1. Steffen Borge (2007). Unwarranted Questions and Conversation. Journal of Pragmatics 39 (10):1689-1701.
    This paper deals with two distinct topics; unwarranted questions and admittures. The traditional speech act analysis of questions needs revision, since among the felicity conditions of asking a question is believing that the question is warranted. Some questions are unwarranted according to my analysis. A question is unwarranted if the questioner is not standing in the right relation to the addressee, such that he can demand or expect a sincere answer. I use the idea of unwarranted questions to show how (...)
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  2. Noel Burton-Roberts (ed.) (2007). Pragmatics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This contribution to Palgrave's 'Advances' series addresses a wide range of issues that have arisen in post-Gricean pragmatic theory, in chapters by distinguished authors. Among the specific topics covered are scalar implicatures, lexical semantics and pragmatics, indexicality, procedural meaning, the semantics and pragmatics of negation. The volume includes both defences and critiques of Relevance Theory and of Neo-Gricean Pragmatics.
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  3. Gennaro Chierchia & Danny Fox, The Grammatical View of Scalar Implicatures and the Relationship Between Semantics and Pragmatics.
    Recently there has been a lively revival of interest in implicatures, particularly scalar implicatures. Building on the resulting literature, our main goal in the present paper is to establish an empirical generalization, namely that SIs can occur systematically and freely in arbitrarily embedded positions. We are not so much concerned with the question whether drawing implicatures is a costly option (in terms of semantic processing, or of some other markedness measure). Nor are we specifically concerned with how implicatures come about (...)
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  4. Stephen Crain, At the Semantics/Pragmatics Interface in Child Language.
    This paper investigates scalar implicatures and downward entailment in child English. In previous experimental work we have shown that adults’ computation of scalar implicatures is sensitive to entailment relations. For instance, when the disjunction operator or occurs in positive contexts, an implicature of exclusivity arises. By contrast when the disjunction operator occurs within the scope of a downward entailing linguistic expression, no implicature of exclusivity is computed. Investigations on children’s computation of scalar implicatures in the same contexts have led to (...)
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  5. Joseph S. Fulda (2013). The Logic of Failures of the Cinematic Imagination: Two Case Studies and a Logical Puzzle and Solution in Just One. Pragmatics and Society 4 (1):105-111.
    This piece is intended to explicate - by providing a precising definition of - the common cinematic figure which I term “the failure of the cinematic imagination,“ while presenting a logical puzzle and its solution within a simple Gricean framework. -/- It should be noted that this is neither fully accurate nor fully precise, because of the audience; one should examine the remaining articles in the issue to understand what I mean.
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  6. Larry Horn, Toward a Fregean Pragmatics: Voraussetzung, Nebengedanke, Andeutung.
    In I. Kecskes & L. Horn (eds.) Explorations in Pragmatics: Linguistic, Cognitive, and Interculural Aspects. Mouton: 39-69.
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  7. Laurence R. Horn & Samuel Bayer (1984). Short-Circuited Implicature: A Negative Contribution. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 7 (4):397 - 414.
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  8. Roni Katzir (2007). Structurally-Defined Alternatives. Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (6):669-690.
    Scalar implicatures depend on alternatives in order to avoid the symmetry problem. I argue for a structure-sensitive characterization of these alternatives: the alternatives for a structure are all those structures that are at most as complex as the original one. There have been claims in the literature that complexity is irrelevant for implicatures and that the relevant condition is the semantic notion of monotonicity. I provide new data that pose a challenge to the use of monotonicity and that support the (...)
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  9. Brent G. Kyle (2013). How Are Thick Terms Evaluative? Philosophers' Imprint 13 (1):1-20.
    Ethicists are typically willing to grant that thick terms (e.g. ‘courageous’ and ‘murder’) are somehow associated with evaluations. But they tend to disagree about what exactly this relationship is. Does a thick term’s evaluation come by way of its semantic content? Or is the evaluation pragmatically associated with the thick term (e.g. via conversational implicature)? In this paper, I argue that thick terms are semantically associated with evaluations. In particular, I argue that many thick concepts (if not all) conceptually entail (...)
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  10. Fabrizio Macagno (2012). Presumptive Reasoning in Interpretation. Implicatures and Conflicts of Presumptions. Argumentation 26 (2):233-265.
    This paper shows how reasoning from best explanation combines with linguistic and factual presumptions during the process of retrieving a speaker’s intention. It is shown how differences between presumptions need to be used to pick the best explanation of a pragmatic manifestation of a dialogical intention. It is shown why we cannot simply jump to an interpretative conclusion based on what we presume to be the most common purpose of a speech act, and why, in cases of indirect speech acts, (...)
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  11. Marco Mazzone (2014). The Continuum Problem: Modified Occam's Razor and Conventionalisation of Meaning. International Review of Pragmatics 6:29-58.
    According to Grice's “Modified Occam's Razor”, in case of uncertainty between the implicature account and the polysemy account of word uses it is parsimonious to opt for the former. However, it is widely agreed that uses can be partially conventionalised by repetition. This fact, I argue, raises a serious problem for MOR as a methodological principle, but also for the substantial notion of implicature in lexical pragmatics. In order to overcome these problems, I propose to reinterpret implicatures in terms of (...)
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  12. Luisa Meronib, The Acquisition of Disjunction: Evidence for a Grammatical View of Scalar Implicatures.
    This paper investigates young children's knowledge of scalar implicatures and downward entailment. In previous experimental work, we have shown that young children access the full range of truth-conditions associated with logical words in classical logic, including the disjunction operator, as well as the indefinite article. The present study extends this research in three ways, taking disjunction as a case study. Experiment 1 draws upon the observation that scalar implicatures (SIs) are cancelled (or reversed) in downward entailing (DE) linguistic environments, e.g., (...)
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  13. Robert Van Rooy (2004). Signalling Games Select Horn Strategies. Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (4):493 - 527.
    In this paper I will discuss why (un) marked expressions typically get an (un)marked interpretation: <span class='Hi'>Horn</span>'s division of pragmatic labor. It is argued that it is a conventional fact that we use language this way. This convention will be explained in terms of the equilibria of signalling games introduced by Lewis (1969), but now in an evolutionary setting. I will also relate this signalling game analysis with Parikh's (1991, 2000, 2001) game-theoretical analysis of successful communication, which in turn is (...)
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  14. Jörg R. J. Schirra (1993). A Contribution to Reference Semantics of Spatial Prepositions: The Visualization Problem and its Solution in Vitra. In Cornelia Zelinsky-Wibbelt (ed.), [Book Chapter]. Mouton de Gruyter
    The cognitive function of mental images with respect to the referential aspect of language is examined and used in the listener model ANTLIMA of the natural language system SOCCER. An operational realization of the reference relation used to recognize instances of spatial concepts in the results of a vision system and also to visualize locative expressions is presented and compared to A. Herskovits' analysis of the semantics of spatial prepositions.
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  15. Savas L. Tsohatzidis (2012). How to Forget That 'Know' is Factive. Acta Analytica 27 (4):449-459.
    This paper examines, and rejects, a recent argument to the effect that knowledge is not truth-entailing, i.e. that “know” is not factive.
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  16. Ingrid van Canegem-Ardijns (2010). The Indefeasibility of the Inference That If Not-A, Then Not-C. Journal of Pragmatics 42 (1):1-15.
    Content and, to a lesser degree, epistemic or inferential conditionals regularly invite conditional perfection as a non-monotonic inference or conversational implicature. Conditional perfection (henceforth CP) is the natural language tendency to perfect conditionals (if A then C) into their corresponding biconditionals (if and only if A, then C) through the mediation of an if not-A, then not-C conditional. In the literature there is some controversy regarding the pragmatic principle by which CP is derived, but there seems to be silent agreement (...)
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  17. Douglas Walton & Fabrizio Macagno (2007). Types of Dialogue, Dialectical Relevance and Textual Congruity. Anthropology and Philosophy 8 (1/2):101-120.
    Using tools like argument diagrams and profiles of dialogue, this paper studies a number of examples of everyday conversational argumentation where determination of relevance and irrelevance can be assisted by means of adopting a new dialectical approach. According to the new dialectical theory, dialogue types are normative frameworks with specific goals and rules that can be applied to conversational argumentation. In this paper is shown how such dialectical models of reasonable argumentation can be applied to a determination of whether an (...)
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