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Profile: Justin D'Arms (Ohio State University)
  1. Justin D'Arms (2011). Empathy, Approval, and Disapproval in Moral Sentimentalism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):134-141.
    This discussion explores the moral psychology and metaethics of Michael Slote's Moral Sentimentalism. I argue that his account of empathy has an important lacuna, because the sense in which an empathizer feels the same feeling that his target feels requires explanation, and the most promising candidates are unavailable to Slote. I then argue that the (highly original) theory of moral approval and disapproval that Slote develops in his book is implausible, both phenomenologically and for the role it accords to empathy. (...)
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  2. Justin D'Arms, Envy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Justin D'Arms & Allison Kerr (2008). Envy in the Philosophical Tradition. In Richard Kim (ed.), Envy, Theory and Research. Oxford University Press. 39-59.
     
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  4. Daniel Jacobson & Justin D'Arms (2006). Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics: Volume 1. Clarendon Press.
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  5. Justin D'Arms (2005). Review: Relationality, Relativism, and Realism About Moral Value. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 126 (3):433 - 448.
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  6. Justin D'Arms (2005). Two Arguments for Sentimentalism. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):1–21.
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  7. Justin D'arms (2004). Bennett Helm, Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation, and the Nature of Value (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), Pp. X + 261. Utilitas 16 (3):343-345.
  8. Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson (2003). VIII. The Significance of Recalcitrant Emotion (or, Anti-Quasijudgmentalism). Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:127-145.
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  9. Justin D'arms (2000). When Evolutionary Game Theory Explains Morality, What Does It Explain? Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):296-299.
    Evolutionary attempts to explain morality tend to say very little about what morality is. If evolutionary game theory aspires not merely to solve the ‘problem of altruism', but to explain human morality or justice in particular, it requires an appropriate conception of that subject matter. This paper argues that one plausible conception of morality (a sanction-based conception) creates some important constraints on the kinds of evolutionary explanations that can shed light on morality. Game theoretic approaches must either meet these constraints, (...)
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  10. Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson (2000). Sentiment and Value. Ethics 110 (4):722-748.
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  11. Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson (2000). The Moralistic Fallacy: On the "Appropriateness" of Emotions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):65-90.
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  12. Justin D'Arms (1999). Robert Audi, Moral Knowledge and Ethical Character:Moral Knowledge and Ethical Character. Ethics 109 (3):645-648.
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  13. Justin D'Arms, Robert Batterman & Krzyzstof Gorny (1998). Game Theoretic Explanations and the Evolution of Justice. Philosophy of Science 65 (1):76-102.
    Game theoretic explanations of the evolution of human behavior have become increasingly widespread. At their best, they allow us to abstract from misleading particulars in order to better recognize and appreciate broad patterns in the phenomena of human social life. We discuss this explanatory strategy, contrasting it with the particularist methodology of contemporary evolutionary psychology. We introduce some guidelines for the assessment of evolutionary game theoretic explanations of human behavior: such explanations should be representative, robust, and flexible. Distinguishing these features (...)
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  14. Justin D'Arms (1996). Sex, Fairness, and the Theory of Games. Journal of Philosophy 93 (12):615-627.
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  15. Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson (1994). Expressivism, Morality, and the Emotions. Ethics 104 (4):739-763.
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