Search results for 'Quantum wave-particle problem' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nicholas Maxwell (1988). Quantum Propensiton Theory: A Testable Resolution of the Wave/Particle Dilemma. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (1):1-50.score: 221.5
    In this paper I put forward a new micro realistic, fundamentally probabilistic, propensiton version of quantum theory. According to this theory, the entities of the quantum domain - electrons, photons, atoms - are neither particles nor fields, but a new kind of fundamentally probabilistic entity, the propensiton - entities which interact with one another probabilistically. This version of quantum theory leaves the Schroedinger equation unchanged, but reinterprets it to specify how propensitons evolve when no probabilistic transitions occur. (...)
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  2. Nicholas Maxwell (1993). Beyond Fapp: Three Approaches to Improving Orthodox Quantum Theory and An Experimental Test. In F. Selleri and G. Tarozzi van der Merwe, F. Selleri & G. Tarozzi (eds.), Bell's Theorem and the Foundations of Modern Physics. World Scientific.score: 161.3
    Because it fails to solve the wave-particle problem, orthodox quantum theory is obliged to be about observables and not quantum beables. As a result the theory is imprecise, ambiguous, ad hoc, lacking in explanatory power, restricted in scope and resistant to unification. A new version of quantum theory is needed that is about quantum beables.
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  3. Nicholas Maxwell (1994). Particle Creation as the Quantum Condition for Probabilistic Events to Occur. Physics Letters A 187 (2 May 1994):351-355.score: 139.5
    A new version of quantum theory is proposed, according to which probabilistic events occur whenever new statioinary or bound states are created as a result of inelastic collisions. The new theory recovers the experimental success of orthodox quantum theory, but differs form the orthodox theory for as yet unperformed experiments.
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  4. J. P. Wesley (1984). A Resolution of the Classical Wave-Particle Problem. Foundations of Physics 14 (2):155-170.score: 138.0
    The classical wave-particle problem is resolved in accord with Newton's concept of the particle nature of light by associating particle density and flux with the classical wave energy density and flux. Point particles flowing along discrete trajectories yield interference and diffraction patterns, as illustrated by Young's double pinhole interference. Bound particle motion is prescribed by standing waves. Particle motion as a function of time is presented for the case of a “particle in a box.” Initial conditions uniquely determine (...)
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  5. Agung Budiyono (2010). On Quantum-Classical Transition of a Single Particle. Foundations of Physics 40 (8):1117-1133.score: 117.0
    We discuss the issue of quantum-classical transition in a system of a single particle with and without external potential. This is done by elaborating the notion of self-trapped wave function recently developed by the author. For a free particle, we show that there is a subset of self-trapped wave functions which is particle-like. Namely, the spatially localized wave packet is moving uniformly with undistorted shape as if the whole wave packet is indeed a classical free particle. The length of (...)
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  6. John Hendry (2006). The Development of Attitudes to the Wave-Particle Duality of Light and Quantum Theory, 1900–1920. Annals of Science 37 (1):59-79.score: 114.0
    (1980). The development of attitudes to the wave-particle duality of light and quantum theory, 1900–1920. Annals of Science: Vol. 37, No. 1, pp. 59-79.
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  7. Ph Gueret & J. -P. Vigier (1982). De Broglie's Wave Particle Duality in the Stochastic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: A Testable Physical Assumption. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 12 (11):1057-1083.score: 112.5
    If one starts from de Broglie's basic relativistic assumptions, i.e., that all particles have an intrinsic real internal vibration in their rest frame, i.e., hv 0 =m 0 c 2 ; that when they are at any one point in space-time the phase of this vibration cannot depend on the choice of the reference frame, then, one can show (following Mackinnon (1) ) that there exists a nondispersive wave packet of de Broglie's waves which can be assimilated to the nonlinear (...)
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  8. S. Rupp, S. Hunzinger & M. Sorg (2002). Exchange Degeneracy of Relativistic Two-Particle Quantum States. Foundations of Physics 32 (5):705-750.score: 102.0
    The phenomenon of exchange degeneracy of 2-particle quantum states is studied in detail within the framework of Relativistic Schrödinger Theory (RST). In conventional quantum theory this kind of degeneracy refers to the circumstance that, under neglection of the interparticle interactions, symmetric and anti-symmetric 2-particle states have identical energy eigenvalues. However the analogous effect of RST degeneracy is rather related to the emergence of two types of mixtures (positive and negative) in connection with the vanishing or non-vanishing of certain (...)
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  9. C. Dewdney, G. Horton, M. M. Lam, Z. Malik & M. Schmidt (1992). Wave-Particle Dualism and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 22 (10):1217-1265.score: 97.5
    The realist interpretations of quantum theory, proposed by de Broglie and by Bohm, are re-examined and their differences, especially concerning many-particle systems and the relativistic regime, are explored. The impact of the recently proposed experiments of Vigier et al. and of Ghose et al. on the debate about the interpretation of quantum mechanics is discussed. An indication of how de Broglie and Bohm would account for these experimental results is given.
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  10. Nikolay L. Chuprikov (2011). From a 1D Completed Scattering and Double Slit Diffraction to the Quantum-Classical Problem for Isolated Systems. Foundations of Physics 41 (9):1502-1520.score: 96.0
    By probability theory the probability space to underlie the set of statistical data described by the squared modulus of a coherent superposition of microscopically distinct (sub)states (CSMDS) is non-Kolmogorovian and, thus, such data are mutually incompatible. For us this fact means that the squared modulus of a CSMDS cannot be unambiguously interpreted as the probability density and quantum mechanics itself, with its current approach to CSMDSs, does not allow a correct statistical interpretation. By the example of a 1D completed (...)
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  11. Diederik Aerts, Jan Broekaert & Sonja Smets (1998). Inconsistencies in Constituent Theories of World Views: Quantum Mechanical Examples. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 3 (2):313-340.score: 94.5
    We put forward the hypothesis that there exist three basic attitudes towards inconsistencies within world views: (1) The inconsistency is tolerated temporarily and is viewed as an expression of a temporary lack of knowledge due to an incomplete or wrong theory. The resolution of the inconsistency is believed to be inherent to the improvement of the theory. This improvement ultimately resolves the contradiction and therefore we call this attitude the ‘regularising’ attitude; (2) The inconsistency is tolerated and both contradicting elements (...)
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  12. Shahriar S. Afshar, Eduardo Flores, Keith F. McDonald & Ernst Knoesel (2007). Paradox in Wave-Particle Duality. Foundations of Physics 37 (2):295-305.score: 94.5
    We report on the simultaneous determination of complementary wave and particle aspects of light in a double-slit type “welcher-weg” experiment beyond the limitations set by Bohr’s Principle of Complementarity. Applying classical logic, we verify the presence of sharp interference in the single photon regime, while reliably maintaining the information about the particular pinhole through which each individual photon had passed. This experiment poses interesting questions on the validity of Complementarity in cases where measurements techniques that avoid Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and (...)
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  13. Lucas C. Céleri, Rafael M. Gomes, Radu Ionicioiu, Thomas Jennewein, Robert B. Mann & Daniel R. Terno (forthcoming). Quantum Control in Foundational Experiments. Foundations of Physics:1-12.score: 94.5
    We describe a new class of experiments designed to probe the foundations of quantum mechanics. Using quantum controlling devices, we show how to attain a freedom in temporal ordering of the control and detection of various phenomena. We consider wave–particle duality in the context of quantum-controlled and the entanglement-assisted delayed-choice experiments. Then we discuss a quantum-controlled CHSH experiment and measurement of photon’s transversal position and momentum in a single set-up.
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  14. P. Schust, M. Mattes & M. Sorg (2004). Quantum Entanglement in Relativistic Three-Particle Systems. Foundations of Physics 34 (1):99-167.score: 90.0
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  15. Nicholas Maxwell (1995). A Philosopher Struggles to Understand Quantum Theory: Particle Creation and Wavepacket Reduction. In M. Ferrero & A. van der Merwe (eds.), Fundamental Problems in Quantum Physics.score: 87.5
    Work on the central problems of the philosophy of science has led the author to attempt to create an intelligible version of quantum theory. The basic idea is that probabilistic transitions occur when new stationary or particle states arise as a result of inelastic collisions.
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  16. Shan Gao, The Wave Function and Particle Ontology.score: 87.0
    In quantum mechanics, the wave function of a N-body system is a mathematical function defined in a 3N-dimensional configuration space. We argue that wave function realism implies particle ontology when assuming: (1) the wave function of a N-body system describes N physical entities; (2) each triple of the 3N coordinates of a point in configuration space that relates to one physical entity represents a point in ordinary three-dimensional space. Moreover, the motion of particles is random and discontinuous.
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  17. Brigitte Falkenburg (2010). Wave–Particle Duality in Quantum Optics. In. In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), Epsa Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Springer. 31--42.score: 85.5
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  18. P. Hájíček (2011). The Quantum Measurement Problem and Cluster Separability. Foundations of Physics 41 (4):640-666.score: 82.0
    A modified Beltrametti-Cassinelli-Lahti model of the measurement apparatus that satisfies both the probability reproducibility condition and the objectification requirement is constructed. Only measurements on microsystems are considered. The cluster separability forms a basis for the first working hypothesis: the current version of quantum mechanics leaves open what happens to systems when they change their separation status. New rules that close this gap can therefore be added without disturbing the logic of quantum mechanics. The second working hypothesis is that (...)
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  19. K. Lewin (2009). The Wave Function Collapse as an Effect of Field Quantization. Foundations of Physics 39 (10):1145-1160.score: 81.0
    It is pointed out that ordinary quantum mechanics as a classical field theory cannot account for the wave function collapse if it is not seen within the framework of field quantization. That is needed to understand the particle structure of matter during wave function evolution and to explain the collapse as symmetry breakdown by detection. The decay of a two-particle bound s state and the Stern-Gerlach experiment serve as examples. The absence of the nonlocality problem in Bohm’s version (...)
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  20. Daniel Peterson (2011). Qeauty and the Books: A Response to Lewis's Quantum Sleeping Beauty Problem. Synthese 181 (3):367-374.score: 79.5
    In his 2007 paper “Quantum Sleeping Beauty”, Peter Lewis poses a problem for the supporters’ of the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics appeal to subjective probability. Lewis’s argument hinges on parallels between the traditional “sleeping beauty” problem in epistemology and a quantum variant. These two cases, Lewis argues, advocate different treatments of credences even though they share important epistemic similarities, leading to a tension between the traditional solution to the sleeping beauty problem (typically called (...)
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  21. J. P. Vigier (1994). Possible Test of the Reality of Superluminal Phase Waves and Particle Phase Space Motions in the Einstein-de Broglie-Bohm Causal Stochastic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 24 (1):61-83.score: 78.0
    Recent double-slit type neutron experiments (1) and their theoretical implications (2) suggest that, since one can tell through which slit the individual neutrons travel, coherent wave packets remain nonlocally coupled (with particles one by one), even in the case of wide spatial separation. Following de Broglie's initial proposal, (3) this property can be derived from the existence of the persisting action of real superluminal physical phase waves considered as building blocks of the real subluminal wave field packets which surround individual (...)
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  22. Jeffrey Grupp (2006). Mereological Nihilism: Quantum Atomism and the Impossibility of Material Constitution. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 16 (3):245-386.score: 77.0
    Mereological nihilism is the philosophical position that there are no items that have parts. If there are no items with parts then the only items that exist are partless fundamental particles, such as the true atoms (also called philosophical atoms) theorized to exist by some ancient philosophers, some contemporary physicists, and some contemporary philosophers. With several novel arguments I show that mereological nihilism is the correct theory of reality. I will also discuss strong similarities that mereological nihilism has with empirical (...)
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  23. Berry Groisman, Na'ama Hallakoun & Lev Vaidman (2013). The Measure of Existence of a Quantum World and the Sleeping Beauty Problem. Analysis 73 (4):695-706.score: 76.5
    Next SectionAn attempt to resolve the controversy regarding the solution of the Sleeping Beauty Problem in the framework of the Many-Worlds Interpretation led to a new controversy regarding the Quantum Sleeping Beauty Problem. We apply the concept of a measure of existence of a world and reach the solution known as ‘thirder’ solution which differs from Peter Lewis’s ‘halfer’ assertion. We argue that this method provides a simple and powerful tool for analysing rational decision theory problems.
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  24. Jeffrey Barrett (2011). Everett's Pure Wave Mechanics and the Notion of Worlds. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (2):277-302.score: 75.0
    Everett (1957a, b, 1973) relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics has often been taken to involve a metaphysical commitment to the existence of many splitting worlds each containing physical copies of observers and the objects they observe. While there was earlier talk of splitting worlds in connection with Everett, this is largely due to DeWitt’s (Phys Today 23:30–35, 1970) popular presentation of the theory. While the thought of splitting worlds or parallel universes has captured the popular imagination, Everett himself favored (...)
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  25. Manuel Bächtold (2008). Five Formulations of the Quantum Measurement Problem in the Frame of the Standard Interpretation. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 39 (1):17 - 33.score: 75.0
    The aim of this paper is to give a systematic account of the so-called “measurement problem” in the frame of the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics. It is argued that there is not one but five distinct formulations of this problem. Each of them depends on what is assumed to be a “satisfactory” description of the measurement process in the frame of the standard interpretation. Moreover, the paper points out that each of these formulations refers not to (...)
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  26. Rodolfo Gambini & Jorge Pullin (2007). Relational Physics with Real Rods and Clocks and the Measurement Problem of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 37 (7):1074-1092.score: 75.0
    The use of real clocks and measuring rods in quantum mechanics implies a natural loss of unitarity in the description of the theory. We briefly review this point and then discuss the implications it has for the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. The intrinsic loss of coherence allows to circumvent some of the usual objections to the measurement process as due to environmental decoherence.
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  27. Slobodan Perovic (2008). Why Were Two Theories (Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics) Deemed Logically Distinct, and yet Equivalent, in Quantum Mechanics? In Christopher Lehrer (ed.), First Annual Conference in the Foundations and History of Quantum Physics. Max Planck Institute for History of Science.score: 75.0
    A recent rethinking of the early history of Quantum Mechanics deemed the late 1920s agreement on the equivalence of Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics, prompted by Schrödinger’s 1926 proof, a myth. Schrödinger supposedly failed to achieve the goal of proving isomorphism of the mathematical structures of the two theories, while only later developments in the early 1930s, especially the work of mathematician John von Neumman (1932) provided sound proof of equivalence. The alleged agreement about the Copenhagen Interpretation, predicated to (...)
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  28. Nicholas Maxwell (1975). Does the Minimal Statistical Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics Resolve the Measurement Problem? Methodology and Science 8:84-101.score: 75.0
    It is argued that the so-called minimal statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics does not completely resolve the measurement problem in that this view is unable to show that quantjum mechanics can dispense with classical physics when it comes to a treatment of the measuring interaction. It is suggested that the view that quantum mechanics applies to individual systems should not be too hastily abandoned, in that this view gives perhaps the best hope of leading to a version (...)
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  29. Michael B. Heaney (2013). A Symmetrical Interpretation of the Klein-Gordon Equation. Foundations of Physics 43 (6):733-746.score: 74.0
    This paper presents a new Symmetrical Interpretation (SI) of relativistic quantum mechanics which postulates: quantum mechanics is a theory about complete experiments, not particles; a complete experiment is maximally described by a complex transition amplitude density; and this transition amplitude density never collapses. This SI is compared to the Copenhagen Interpretation (CI) for the analysis of Einstein’s bubble experiment. This SI makes several experimentally testable predictions that differ from the CI, solves one part of the measurement problem, (...)
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  30. Gilad Gour (2002). The Quantum Phase Problem: Steps Toward a Resolution. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (6):907-926.score: 73.5
    Defining the observable φ canonically conjugate to the number observable N has long been an open problem in quantum theory. The problem stems from the fact that N is bounded from below. In a previous work we have shown how to define the absolute phase observable Φ≡|φ| by suitably restricting the Hilbert space of x and p like variables. Here we show that also from the classical point of view, there is no rigorous definition for the phase (...)
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  31. Nicholas Maxwell (1972). A New Look at the Quantum Mechanical Problem of Measurement. American Journal of Physics 40:1431-5..score: 72.0
    According to orthodox quantum mechanics, state vectors change in two incompatible ways: "deterministically" in accordance with Schroedinger's time-dependent equation, and probabilistically if and only if a measurement is made. It is argued here that the problem of measurement arises because the precise mutually exclusive conditions for these two types of transitions to occur are not specified within orthodox quantum mechanics. Fundamentally, this is due to an inevitable ambiguity in the notion of "meawurement" itself. Hence, if the (...) of measurement is to be resolved, a new, fully objective version of quantjm mechanics needs to be developed which does not incorporate the notion of measurement in its basic postuolates at all. (shrink)
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  32. Graciela Domenech & Federico Holik (2007). A Discussion on Particle Number and Quantum Indistinguishability. Foundations of Physics 37 (6):855-878.score: 72.0
    The concept of individuality in quantum mechanics shows radical differences from the concept of individuality in classical physics, as E. Schrödinger pointed out in the early steps of the theory. Regarding this fact, some authors suggested that quantum mechanics does not possess its own language, and therefore, quantum indistinguishability is not incorporated in the theory from the beginning. Nevertheless, it is possible to represent the idea of quantum indistinguishability with a first-order language using quasiset theory (Q). (...)
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  33. Rodolfo Gambini, Luis Pedro García Pintos & Jorge Pullin (2010). Undecidability and the Problem of Outcomes in Quantum Measurements. Foundations of Physics 40 (1):93-115.score: 72.0
    We argue that it is fundamentally impossible to recover information about quantum superpositions when a quantum system has interacted with a sufficiently large number of degrees of freedom of the environment. This is due to the fact that gravity imposes fundamental limitations on how accurate measurements can be. This leads to the notion of undecidability: there is no way to tell, due to fundamental limitations, if a quantum system evolved unitarily or suffered wavefunction collapse. This in turn (...)
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  34. C. K. Raju (2004). The Electrodynamic 2-Body Problem and the Origin of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 34 (6):937-962.score: 72.0
    We numerically solve the functional differential equations (FDEs) of 2-particle electrodynamics, using the full electrodynamic force obtained from the retarded Lienard–Wiechert potentials and the Lorentz force law. In contrast, the usual formulation uses only the Coulomb force (scalar potential), reducing the electrodynamic 2-body problem to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The ODE formulation is mathematically suspect since FDEs and ODEs are known to be incompatible; however, the Coulomb approximation to the full electrodynamic force has been believed to (...)
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  35. Hrvoje Nikolić (2007). Quantum Mechanics: Myths and Facts. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 37 (11):1563-1611.score: 71.5
    A common understanding of quantum mechanics (QM) among students and practical users is often plagued by a number of “myths”, that is, widely accepted claims on which there is not really a general consensus among experts in foundations of QM. These myths include wave-particle duality, time-energy uncertainty relation, fundamental randomness, the absence of measurement-independent reality, locality of QM, nonlocality of QM, the existence of well-defined relativistic QM, the claims that quantum field theory (QFT) solves the problems of (...)
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  36. R. Aurich & F. Steiner (2001). Orbit Sum Rules for the Quantum Wave Functions of the Strongly Chaotic Hadamard Billiard in Arbitrary Dimensions. Foundations of Physics 31 (4):569-592.score: 69.0
    Sum rules are derived for the quantum wave functions of the Hadamard billiard in arbitrary dimensions. This billiard is a strongly chaotic (Anosov) system which consists of a point particle moving freely on a D-dimensional compact manifold (orbifold) of constant negative curvature. The sum rules express a general (two-point)correlation function of the quantum mechanical wave functions in terms of a sum over the orbits of the corresponding classical system. By taking the trace of the orbit sum rule or (...)
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  37. A. Orefice, R. Giovanelli & D. Ditto (2009). Complete Hamiltonian Description of Wave-Like Features in Classical and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 39 (3):256-272.score: 69.0
    The analysis of the Helmholtz equation is shown to lead to an exact Hamiltonian system describing in terms of ray trajectories, for a stationary refractive medium, a very wide family of wave-like phenomena (including diffraction and interference) going much beyond the limits of the geometrical optics (“eikonal”) approximation, which is contained as a simple limiting case. Due to the fact, moreover, that the time independent Schrödinger equation is itself a Helmholtz-like equation, the same mathematics holding for a classical optical beam (...)
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  38. Marie-Christine Combourieu & Helmut Rauch (1992). The Wave-Particle Dualism in 1992: A Summary. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 22 (12):1403-1434.score: 69.0
    We review the past and present theoretical and experimental situations relating to wave-particle dualism. New tests aimed at enlightening the individual behavior as awave, then as aparticle, of asingle quantum mechanical system in the same experimental run are presented. The related epistemological, philosophical, and historical backgrounds are presented in a twofold exposition taking into account thepositivistic standard Copenhagen interpretation as well as therealist de Broglian point of view.
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  39. Machiel Kleemans (2010). Kristian Camilleri: Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (11):1783-1787.score: 69.0
    The book Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher, by Kristian Camilleri is critically reviewed. The work details Heisenberg’s philosophical development from an early positivist commitment towards a later philosophy of language. It is of interest to researchers and graduate students in the history and philosophy of quantum mechanics.
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  40. Helmut Rauch (2012). Neutron Matter Wave Quantum Optics. Foundations of Physics 42 (6):760-777.score: 69.0
    Neutron matter-wave optics provides the basis for new quantum experiments and a step towards applications of quantum phenomena. Most experiments have been performed with a perfect crystal neutron interferometer where widely separated coherent beams can be manipulated individually. Various geometric phases have been measured and their robustness against fluctuation effects has been proven, which may become a useful property for advanced quantum communication. Quantum contextuality for single particle systems shows that quantum correlations are to some (...)
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  41. Pilar Fernández Beites (1993). Individuación y mal. Una lectura de Schelling. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 10:413.score: 69.0
    Max Born’s philosophic and scientific legacy is related to the orthodox interpretation of quantum mechanics, which is known as the Interpretation of Copenhague. Therefore Born’s statistical interpretation has been considered as defending a positivist philosophy of science. Opposing this idea, this article is intended to face two main questions. The first one deals with the fact that Born’s interpretation of wave function, although it settles indeterminism, does not imply the abandonment of causal explanations of physical phenomena The second one (...)
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  42. Willem M. Muynck & Gidi P. Liempd (1986). On the Relation Between Indistinguishability of Identical Particles and (Anti)Symmetry of the Wave Function in Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 67 (3):477 - 496.score: 68.0
    Two different concepts of distinguishability are often mixed up in attempts to derive in quantum mechanics the (anti)symmetry of the wave function from indistinguishability of identical particles. Some of these attempts are analyzed and shown to be defective. It is argued that, although identical particles should be considered as observationally indistinguishable in (anti)symmetric states, they may be considered to be conceptually distinguishable. These two notions of (in)distinguishability have quite different physical origins, the former one being related to observations while (...)
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  43. Valia Allori (2013). On the Metaphysics of Quantum Mechanics. In Soazig Lebihan (ed.), Precis de la Philosophie de la Physique. Vuibert.score: 67.0
    What is quantum mechanics about? The most natural way to interpret quantum mechanics realistically as a theory about the world might seem to be what is called wave function ontology: the view according to which the wave function mathematically represents in a complete way fundamentally all there is in the world. Erwin Schroedinger was one of the first proponents of such a view, but he dismissed it after he realized it led to macroscopic superpositions (if the wave function (...)
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  44. J. A. E. Roa-Neri & J. L. Jiménez (2004). Radiation Reaction of a Nonrelativistic Quantum Charged Particle. Foundations of Physics 34 (4):547-580.score: 64.5
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  45. Michael E. Cuffaro (2012). Many Worlds, the Cluster-State Quantum Computer, and the Problem of the Preferred Basis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 43 (1):35-42.score: 63.0
    I argue that the many worlds explanation of quantum computation is not licensed by, and in fact is conceptually inferior to, the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics from which it is derived. I argue that the many worlds explanation of quantum computation is incompatible with the recently developed cluster state model of quantum computation. Based on these considerations I conclude that we should reject the many worlds explanation of quantum computation.
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  46. Matej Pavšič (1996). On the Resolution of Time Problem in Quantum Gravity Induced From Unconstrained Membranes. Foundations of Physics 26 (2):159-195.score: 63.0
    The relativistic theory of unconstrained p-dimensional membranes (p-branes) is further developed and then applied to the embedding model of induced gravity. Space-time is considered as a 4-dimensional unconstrained membrane evolving in an N-dimensional embedding space. The parameter of evolution or the evolution time τ is a distinct concept from the coordinate time t=x0. Quantization of the theory is also discussed. A covariant functional Schrödinger equation has a solution for the wave functional such that it is sharply localized in a certain (...)
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  47. J. Anandan (1999). The Quantum Measurement Problem and the Possible Role of the Gravitational Field. Foundations of Physics 29 (3):333-348.score: 63.0
    The quantum measurement problem and various unsuccessful attempts to resolve it are reviewed. A suggestion by Diosi and Penrose for the half-life of the quantum superposition of two Newtonian gravitational fields is generalized to an arbitrary quantum superposition of relativistic, but weak, gravitational fields. The nature of the “collapse” process of the wave function is examined.
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  48. David A. Owen (1994). On Quantum Electrodynamics of Two-Particle Bound States Containing Spinless Particles. Foundations of Physics 24 (2):273-296.score: 63.0
    We develop here the general treatment arising from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for a two-particle bound system in which at least one of the particles is spinless. It is shown that a natural two-component formalism can be formulated for describing the propagators of scalar particles. This leads to a formulation of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in a form very reminiscent of the fermion-fermion case. It is also shown, that using this two-component formulation for spinless particles, the perturbation theory can be systematically developed (...)
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  49. M. Cini, M. De Maria, G. Mattioli & F. Nicolò (1979). Wave Packet Reduction in Quantum Mechanics: A Model of a Measuring Apparatus. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 9 (7-8):479-500.score: 63.0
    We investigate the problem of “wave packet reduction” in quantum mechanics by solving the Schrödinger equation for a system composed of a model measuring apparatusM interacting with a microscopic objects. The “instrument” is intended to be somewhat more realistic than others previously proposed, but at the same time still simple enough to lead to an explicit solution for the time-dependent density matrix. It turns out that,practically, everything happens as if the wave packet reduction had occurred. This is a (...)
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  50. L. Ferrari (1989). The Covariance Problem and the Hamiltonian Formalism in Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 19 (5):579-605.score: 63.0
    The traditional approach to the covariance problem in quantum mechanics is inverted and the space-time transformations are assumed as the basicunknowns, according to the prescription that the correspondence principle and the commutation rules must becovariant. It is shown that the only solutions are either Galilean or Lorentzian (including the possibility of an imaginary light-velocity c2<0). The Dirac formalism for the wave-equation and the condition c2>0 are obtained simoultaneously as theunique solution, provided that the Hamiltonian is Hermitean (in the (...)
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