Search results for 'Technological forecasting' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Ota Sulc (1977). Methodology of Forecasting Complex Development Processes of the Scientific and Technological Revolution. Centre for the Study of Science, Technology, and Develop[Ment], Council of Scientific and Industrial Research.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  14
    Carolyn R. Miller (1994). Opportunity, Opportunism, and Progress:Kairos in the Rhetoric of Technology. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (1):81-96.
    As the principle of timing or opportunity,kairos serves both as a powerful theme within technological discourse and as an analytical concept that explains some of the suasory force by which such discourse maintains itself and its position in our culture. This essay makes a case for a rhetoric of technology that is distinct from the rhetoric of science and illustrates the value of the classical vocabulary for understanding contemporary rhetoric. This case is made by examining images and models of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Augusto Forti (ed.) (1984). Scientific Forecasting and Human Needs: Trends, Methods, and Message: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Tbilisi, Ussr, 6-11 December 1981. [REVIEW] Pergamon.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Michio Kaku (1997). Visions: How Science Will Revolutionize the 21st Century. Anchor Books.
    In a spellbinding narrative that skillfully weaves together cutting-edge research among today's foremost scientists, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku--author of the bestselling book Hyperspace --presents a bold, exhilarating adventure into the science of tomorrow. In Visions, Dr. Kaku examines in vivid detail how the three scientific revolutions that profoundly reshaped the twentieth century--the quantum, biogenetic, and computer revolutions--will transform the way we live in the twenty-first century. The fundamental elements of matter and life--the particles of the atom and the nucleus of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  5.  49
    Benoît Godin (2010). Innovation Without the Word: William F. Ogburn's Contribution to the Study of Technological Innovation. [REVIEW] Minerva 48 (3):277-307.
    The history of innovation as a category is dominated by economists and by the contribution of J. A. Schumpeter. This paper documents the contribution of a neglected but influential author, the American sociologist William F. Ogburn. Over a period of more than 30 years, Ogburn developed pioneering ideas on three dimensions of technological innovation: origins, diffusion, and effects. He also developed the first conceptual framework for innovation studies—based on the concept of cultural lags—which led to studying and forecasting (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  10
    D. S. Horner (2005). Anticipating Ethical Challenges: Is There a Coming Era of Nanotechnology? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):127-138.
    In this paper I question the claims made for a ‘coming era of nanotechnology’ and the ethical challenges, it is argued, that are entailed by this particular technological revolution. I argue that such futurist claims are sustained by an untenable modernist narrative which separates the technical and the social. This is exemplified by the work of K. Eric Drexler and his claim that whilst the course of scientific knowledge may remain unpredictable we nevertheless can predict with accuracy the trajectory (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. John Danaher (forthcoming). Will Life Be Worth Living in a World Without Work? Technological Unemployment and the Meaning of Life. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-24.
    Suppose we are about to enter an era of increasing technological unemployment. What implications does this have for society? Two distinct ethical/social issues would seem to arise. The first is one of distributive justice: how will the (presumed) efficiency gains from automated labour be distributed through society? The second is one of personal fulfillment and meaning: if people no longer have to work, what will they do with their lives? In this article, I set aside the first issue and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. John Danaher (2014). Sex Work, Technological Unemployment and the Basic Income Guarantee. Journal of Evolution and Technology 24 (1):113-130.
    Is sex work (specifically, prostitution) vulnerable to technological unemployment? Several authors have argued that it is. They claim that the advent of sophisticated sexual robots will lead to the displacement of human prostitutes, just as, say, the advent of sophisticated manufacturing robots have displaced many traditional forms of factory labour. But are they right? In this article, I critically assess the argument that has been made in favour of this displacement hypothesis. Although I grant the argument a degree of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  68
    Yoni van Den Eede (2011). In Between Us: On the Transparency and Opacity of Technological Mediation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 16 (2):139-159.
    In recent years several approaches—philosophical, sociological, psychological—have been developed to come to grips with our profoundly technologically mediated world. However, notwithstanding the vast merit of each, they illuminate only certain aspects of technological mediation. This paper is a preliminary attempt at a philosophical reflection on technological mediation as such—deploying the concepts of ‘transparency’ and ‘opacity’ as heuristic instruments. Hence, we locate a ‘theory of transparency’ within several theoretical frameworks—respectively classic phenomenology, media theory, Actor Network Theory, postphenomenology, several ethnographical, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  10.  25
    Katinka Waelbers (2009). Technological Delegation: Responsibility for the Unintended. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):51-68.
    This article defends three interconnected premises that together demand for a new way of dealing with moral responsibility in developing and using technological artifacts. The first premise is that humans increasingly make use of dissociated technological delegation. Second, because technologies do not simply fulfill our actions, but rather mediate them, the initial aims alter and outcomes are often different from those intended. Third, since the outcomes are often unforeseen and unintended, we can no longer simply apply the traditional (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  11. Ramón Queraltó (2013). Ethics as a Beneficial Trojan Horse in a Technological Society. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):13-26.
    This article explores the transformation of ethics in a globalizing technological society. After describing some basic features of this society, particularly the primacy it gives to a special type of technical rationality, three specific influences on traditional ethics are examined: (1) a change concerning the notion of value, (2) the decreasing relevance of the concept of axiological hierarchy, and (3) the new internal architecture of ethics as a net of values. These three characteristics suggest a new pragmatic understanding of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  15
    Wolter Pieters (2013). On Thinging Things and Serving Services: Technological Mediation and Inseparable Goods. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 15 (3):195-208.
    In our high-tech society, the design process involves profound questions about the effects of the resulting goods, and the responsibilities of designers. In the philosophy of technology, effects of “things” on user experience and behaviour have been discussed in terms of the concept of technological mediation. Meanwhile, what we create has moved more and more towards services (processes) rather than products (things), in particular in the context of information services. The question is raised to what extent the concept of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  24
    Dane Scott (2011). The Technological Fix Criticisms and the Agricultural Biotechnology Debate. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):207-226.
    A common tactic in public debates over science and technology is to dismissively label innovations as mere technological fixes. This tactic can be readily observed in the long debate over agricultural biotechnology. While these criticisms are often superficial rhetorical tactics, they point to deeper philosophical disagreements about the role of technology in society. Examining the technological fix criticism can clarify these underlying philosophical disagreements and the debate over biotechnology. The first part of this essay discusses the origins of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  14.  11
    Sadjad Soltanzadeh (2016). Questioning Two Assumptions in the Metaphysics of Technological Objects. Philosophy and Technology 29 (2):127-135.
    There are at least two assumptions which, except for very few occasions, have not been discussed by philosophers who have written on the metaphysics of technological objects. The first assumption is that to be a technology is an absolute matter and that all technological objects are equally technological. The second assumption is that the property of being technological is abstracted from existing things which happen to have this property in common. I appeal to the definition of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  47
    Hans Radder (2013). Exploring Philosophical Issues in the Patenting of Scientific and Technological Inventions. Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):283-300.
    Thus far, the philosophical study of patenting has primarily focused on sociopolitical, legal, and ethical issues, such as the moral justifiability of patenting living organisms or the nature of (intellectual) property. In addition, however, the theory and practice of patenting entails many important problems that can be fruitfully studied from the perspective of the philosophy of science and technology. The principal aim of this article is to substantiate the latter claim. For this purpose, I first provide a concise review of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  12
    Zhouying Jin (2011). Global Technological Change: From Hard Technology to Soft Technology. Intellect.
    This updated second edition of Global Technological Change reconsiders how we make and use technology in the twenty-first century.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  48
    Nikil Mukerji (2014). Technological Progress and Responsibility. In Fiorella Battaglia, Nikil Mukerji & Julian Nida-Rümelin (eds.), Rethinking Responsibility in Science and Technology. Pisa University Press 25-36.
    In this essay, I will examine how technological progress affects the responsibilities of human agents. To this end, I will distinguish between two interpretations of the concept of responsibility, viz. responsibility as attributability and substantive responsibility. On the former interpretation, responsibility has to do with the idea of authorship. When we say that a person is responsible for her actions we mean that she is to be seen as the author of these actions. They can be attributed to her, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  8
    Chih-Jou Chen, Chia-Chin Chang & Shiu-Wan Hung (2011). Influences of Technological Attributes and Environmental Factors on Technology Commercialization. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):525-535.
    As part of a new focus on sustainability, this study examines the effects of technological attributes, market potential, and environmental factors on the commercialization of technologies. A survey was conducted on two of Taiwan’s promising sustainable high-tech industries—solar photovoltaic (PV) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). We found that if the technologies possess the specific attributes of innovativeness, genericness, simplicity, and compatibility, as required by the potential adopters, the level of market potential will be more favorable and technology commercialization (TC) (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  8
    J. Sousa Silva (1988). The Contradictions of the Biorevolution for the Development of Agriculture in the Third World: Biotechnology and Capitalist Interest. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):61-70.
    All biotechnology-related promises are based upon its technological potential; yet, many of these promises assure the solution for chronic socio-economic problems in the Third World through a new technological revolution in agriculture. The forecasting is that such a revolution will start delivering its most profound impact early in the 21st century. However, 11 years before the year 2000, a critical analysis of its promises against its current trends indicates that the future use and impact of biotechnology in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  24
    David Smith & Rajesh Kochhar (2002). Multimedia Archiving of Technological Change in a Traditional Creative Industry: A Case Study of the Dhokra Artisans of Bankura, West Bengal. [REVIEW] AI and Society 16 (4):350-365.
    Many recent studies of technological change have focussed on the implementation of computer-based high technology systems. The research described here deals with the introduction of a new but ‘low’ technology into an ancient craft tradition in India. The paper describes a project to capture and archive aspects of the tacit knowledge content of the traditional cire perdue brass foundry (Dhokra) craft of Bikna village, near Bankura, West Bengal. The research involved collaboration between the Indian National Institute for Science, Technology (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  7
    Beate Ochsner, Markus Spöhrer & Robert Stock (2015). Human, Non-Human, and Beyond: Cochlear Implants in Socio-Technological Environments. NanoEthics 9 (3):237-250.
    The paper focuses on processes of normalization through which dis/ability is simultaneously produced in specific collectives, networks, and socio-technological systems that enable the construction of such demarcations. Our point of departure is the cochlear implant, a neuroprosthetic device intended to replace and/or augment the function of the damaged inner ear. Unlike hearing aids, which amplify sounds, the CI does the work of damaged hair cells in the inner ear by providing sound signals to the brain. We examine the processes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  16
    Stephen Hetherington (2015). Technological Knowledge-That As Knowledge-How: A Comment. Philosophy and Technology 28 (4):567-572.
    Norström has argued that contemporary epistemological debates about the conceptual relations between knowledge-that and knowledge-how need to be supplemented by a concept of technological knowledge—with this being a further kind of knowledge. But this paper argues that Norström has not shown why technological knowledge-that is so distinctive because Norström has not shown that such knowledge cannot be reduced conceptually to a form of knowledge-how. The paper thus applies practicalism to the case of technological knowledge-that. Indeed, the paper (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  13
    Mithun Bantwal Rao, Joost Jongerden, Pieter Lemmens & Guido Ruivenkamp (2015). Technological Mediation and Power: Postphenomenology, Critical Theory, and Autonomist Marxism. Philosophy and Technology 28 (3):449-474.
    This article focuses on the power of technological mediation from the point of view of autonomist Marxism. The first part of the article discusses the theories developed on technological mediation in postphenomenology and critical theory of technology with regard to their respective power perspectives and ways of coping with relations of power embedded in technical artifacts and systems. Rather than focusing on the clashes between the hermeneutic postphenomenological approach and the dialectics of critical theory, it is argued that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  24
    Fabiana Bekerman (2013). The Scientific Field During Argentina's Latest Military Dictatorship (1976–1983): Contraction of Public Universities and Expansion of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Research (CONICET). [REVIEW] Minerva 51 (2):253-269.
    This study looks at some of the traits that characterized Argentina’s scientific and university policies under the military regime that spanned from 1976 through 1983. To this end, it delves into a rarely explored empirical observation: financial resource transfers from national universities to the National Scientific and Technological Research Council (CONICET, for its Spanish acronym) during that period. The intention is to show how, by reallocating funds geared to Science and Technology, CONICET was made to expand and decentralize to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  15
    Mrill Ingram (2002). Producing the Natural Fiber Naturally: Technological Change and the US Organic Cotton Industry. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):325-336.
    Organic cotton productionboomed in the early 1990s only to fall steeplymid-decade. Production is currently rising, butslowly, and has yet to reach previous levels.This is in marked contrast to the steady growthin organic food production during the 1990s.Why, when other areas of organic productionexperienced steady growth, did organic cottonexperience a boom and bust? A study of thecotton production and processing industryreveals a long and heavily industrializedproduction chain that has presented numerouschallenges to growers and processors trying tointroduce an organic product. In addition, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  16
    Prof Wolfgang Bibel (1989). The Technological Change of Reality: Opportunities and Dangers. [REVIEW] AI and Society 3 (2):117-132.
    This essay discusses the trade-off between the opportunities and the dangers involved in technological change. It is argued that Artificial Intelligence technology, if properly used, could contribute substantially to coping with some of the major problems the world faces because of the highly complex interconnectivity of modern human society.In order to lay the foundation for the discussion, the symptoms of general unease which are associated with current technological progress, the concept of reality, and the field of Artificial Intelligence (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  35
    William P. Cordeiro (1997). Suggested Management Responses to Ethical Issues Raised by Technological Change. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1393-1400.
    The development of technology raises an array of ethical issues related to work. Many of these ethical issues are old issues surfacing under new guises. Technology has not changed the issues, but technology makes the issues' analysis and application more complex. This paper identifies several new ethical issues raised by technological change: computer crime, an over-reliance on computer controlled systems, bio-technical developments, degradation of quality-of-life at work and new categories of work-related injuries. These issues are discussed in the context (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  10
    Cassandra L. Pinnick (1996). Epistemology of Technology Assessment. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 3 (1):14-18.
    This paper criticizes Coliingridge’s arguments against an epistemology of technological control. Collingridge claims that because prediction mechanisms are inadequate, his “dilemma of control” demonstrates that the sociopolitical impact of new technologies cannot be forecasted, and that, consequently, policy makers must concentrate their control measures on minimizing the costs required to alter entrenched technologies. I argue that Collingridge does not show on either horn that forecasting is impossible, and that his criticisms of forecasting methods are self-defeating for they (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  11
    Martina Merz & Peter Biniok (2010). How Technological Platforms Reconfigure Science-Industry Relations: The Case of Micro- and Nanotechnology. [REVIEW] Minerva 48 (2):105-124.
    With reference to the recent science studies debate on the nature of science-industry relationship, this article focuses on a novel organizational form: the technological platform. Considering the field of micro- and nanotechnology in Switzerland, it investigates how technological platforms participate in framing science-industry activities. On the basis of a comparative analysis of three technological platforms, it shows that the platforms relate distinctly to academic and to industrial users. It distinguishes three pairs of user models, one model in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. John R. Dakers (ed.) (2006). Defining Technological Literacy: Towards an Epistemological Framework. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Technologies can range from the simplest of shelters to keep us warm and dry, to the most complex bioengineering interventions. In this technologically mediated world we now inhabit, there is a growing need for human beings, and particularly young people, to be more critically involved in the discourse surrounding technology. In order to achieve a truly democratic world, any tensions or confusions between human beings, their environment, and their technologies must be resolved. Only then will people become empowered to improve (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  9
    Stacey Irwin (2005). Technological Other/Quasi Other: Reflection on Lived Experience. Human Studies 28 (4):453-467.
    This reflection focuses on lived experience with the Technological Other (Quasi-Other) while pursuing creative video and film activities. In the last decade work in the video and film industries has been transformed through digital manipulation and enhancement brought about by increasingly sophisticated computer technologies. The rules of the craft have not changed but the relationship the artist/editor experiences with these new digital tools has brought about increasingly interesting existential experiences in the creative process. How might this new way of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  20
    Katinka Waelbers (2009). From Assigning to Designing Technological Agency. Human Studies 32 (2):241-250.
    In What Things Do , Verbeek (What things do: philosophical reflections on technology, agency and design. Penn State University Press, University Park, 2005a ) develops a vocabulary for understanding the social role of technological artifacts in our culture and in our daily lives. He understands this role in terms of the technological mediation of human behavior and perception. To explain mediation, he levels out the modernist separation of subjects and objects by decreasing the autonomy of humans and increasing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  16
    Christopher L. Magee (2012). Towards Quantification of the Role of Materials Innovation in Overall Technological Development. Complexity 18 (1):10-25.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  18
    Lauren N. Harkrider, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Zhanna Bagdasarov, James F. Johnson, Michael D. Mumford, Shane Connelly & Lynn D. Devenport (2014). Retracted Article: Improving Case-Based Ethics Training: How Modeling Behaviors and Forecasting Influence Effectiveness. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):299-299.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. Rachel Laudan (1984). The Nature of Technological Knowledge Are Models of Scientific Change Relevant?
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  36. Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2015). The Heuristics of Fear: Can the Ambivalence of Fear Teach Us Anything in the Technological Age? Ethics in Progress 6 (1):225-238.
    The paper assumes that fear presents a certain degree of ambivalence. To say it with Hans Jonas (1903-1993), fear is not only a negative emotion, but may teach us something very important: we recognize what is relevant when we perceive that it is at stake. Under this respect, fear may be assumed as a guide to responsibility, a virtue that is becoming increasingly important, because of the role played by human technology in the current ecological crisis. Secondly, fear and responsibility (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  9
    David E. Smith, J. Robert Skalnik & Patricia C. Skalnik (1997). The bST Debate: The Relationship Between Awareness and Acceptance of Technological Advances. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (1):59-66.
    Despite concerns of consumer protection andenvironmental groups that the use of geneticallyproduced growth hormone in milk-producing cows mayadversely impact the safety of the milk supply,scientific evidence and governmental findings from theUSA appear to indicate that milk fromtreated cows is identical in quality, taste, andnutritional value to milk from untreated cows. Limitedexperience to date in the USA demonstrateslittle consumer resistance to milk from cows that havereceived the growth hormone, which can lead to a 15%increase in milk production. In fact, if there (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  10
    David Carpenter (2003). An Investigation Into the Transition From Technological to Ecological Rice Farming Among Resource Poor Farmers From the Philippine Island of Bohol. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):165-176.
    A conceptual framework influenced bythe concept of moral ecology is developed andused to analyze the transition fromtechnological (green revolution) to ecological(organic) rice farming by resource poor farmersfrom the Philippine island of Bohol. This MoralEcology Framework (MEF) focuses on theepistemology of the two farming systems and howthis influences management principles andpractice. The orienting concepts of systemic understanding, exchange betweensociety and the environment, local versusextra-local exchange and scope areintegral to this analysis. The case studydemonstrates how the ostracism of nature underthe green revolution (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  6
    Rethinking Technological Literacy (2006). Inthischapter I Explain the Relationship Between Globalization and Technological Literacy. After Accounting for the Notion of Technologi-Calliteracythat. In John R. Dakers (ed.), Defining Technological Literacy: Towards an Epistemological Framework. Palgrave Macmillan
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  5
    Lauren N. Harkrider, Chase E. Thiel, Zhanna Bagdasarov, Michael D. Mumford, James F. Johnson, Shane Connelly & Lynn D. Devenport (2012). Improving Case-Based Ethics Training with Codes of Conduct and Forecasting Content. Ethics and Behavior 22 (4):258 - 280.
    Although case-based training is popular for ethics education, little is known about how specific case content influences training effectiveness. Therefore, the effects of (a) codes of ethical conduct and (b) forecasting content were investigated. Results revealed richer cases, including both codes and forecasting content, led to increased knowledge acquisition, greater sensemaking strategy use, and better decision ethicality. With richer cases, a specific pattern emerged. Specifically, content describing codes alone was more effective when combined with short-term forecasts, whereas content (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  41.  15
    Philip J. Nickel (2013). Trust in Technological Systems. In M. J. de Vries, S. O. Hansson & A. W. M. Meijers (eds.), Norms in technology: Philosophy of Engineering and Technology, Vol. 9. Springer
    Technology is a practically indispensible means for satisfying one’s basic interests in all central areas of human life including nutrition, habitation, health care, entertainment, transportation, and social interaction. It is impossible for any one person, even a well-trained scientist or engineer, to know enough about how technology works in these different areas to make a calculated choice about whether to rely on the vast majority of the technologies she/he in fact relies upon. Yet, there are substantial risks, uncertainties, and unforeseen (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  42.  48
    Michael D. Mumford, Chase E. Thiel, Jared J. Caughron, Xiaoqian Wang, Alison L. Antes & Cheryl K. Stenmark (2010). Strategies in Forecasting Outcomes in Ethical Decision-Making: Identifying and Analyzing the Causes of the Problem. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):110-127.
    This study examined the role of key causal analysis strategies in forecasting and ethical decision-making. Undergraduate participants took on the role of the key actor in several ethical problems and were asked to identify and analyze the causes, forecast potential outcomes, and make a decision about each problem. Time pressure and analytic mindset were manipulated while participants worked through these problems. The results indicated that forecast quality was associated with decision ethicality, and the identification of the critical causes of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  43. Geertrui Smedts (2008). Parenting in a Technological Age. Ethics and Education 3 (2):121-134.
    Technology is not just a tool but an amalgam of conceptual, institutional, and interactional issues that occupy the space of technical reason. In this space, parents' identity is becoming narrowed according to a limited conception in which the place of caring is in danger of being lost. Parents are increasingly required to adopt knowledge on parent ing instead of adapting it to their child's needs. By use of the Heideggerian idea of Enframing, I argue that educational experts and practitioners need (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  34
    Tsjalling Swierstra & Katinka Waelbers (2012). Designing a Good Life: A Matrix for the Technological Mediation of Morality. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):157-172.
    Technologies fulfill a social role in the sense that they influence the moral actions of people, often in unintended and unforeseen ways. Scientists and engineers are already accepting much responsibility for the technological, economical and environmental aspects of their work. This article asks them to take an extra step, and now also consider the social role of their products. The aim is to enable engineers to take a prospective responsibility for the future social roles of their technologies by providing (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  45.  52
    Hans Jonas (1980). Philosophical Essays: From Ancient Creed to Technological Man. University of Chicago Press.
    Technology and responsibility: reflections on the new tasks of ethics.--Jewish and Christian elements in philosophy: their share in the emergence of the modern mind.--Seventeenth century and after: the meaning of the scientific and technological revolution.--Socio-economic knowledge and ignorance of goals.--Philosophical reflections on experimenting with human subjects.--Against the stream: comments on the definition and redefinition of death.--Biological engineering--a preview--Contemporary problems in ethics from a Jewish perspective.--Biological foundations of individuality.--Spinoza and the theory of organism.--Sight and thought: a review of "visual thinking."--Change (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  46.  4
    Larry A. Hickman (2001). Philosophical Tools for Technological Culture : Putting Pragmatism to Work. Indiana University Press.
    Hickman situates Dewey’s critique of technological culture within the debates of 20th-century Western philosophy by engaging the work of Richard Rorty, Albert Borgmann, Jacques Ellul, Walter Benjamin, Jürgen Habermas, and Martin ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  47.  80
    Philip Brey (2008). The Technological Construction of Social Power. Social Epistemology 22 (1):71 – 95.
    This essay presents a theory of the role of technology in the distribution and exercise of social power. The paper studies how technical artefacts and systems are used to construct, maintain or strengthen power relations between agents, whether individuals or groups, and how their introduction and use in society differentially empowers and disempowers agents. The theory is developed in three steps. First, a definition of power is proposed, based on a careful discussion of opposing definitions of power, and it is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  48.  96
    Nick Bostrom (2009). Astronomical Waste: The Opportunity Cost of Delayed Technological Development. Utilitas 15 (3):308.
    With very advanced technology, a very large population of people living happy lives could be sustained in the accessible region of the universe. For every year that development of such technologies and colonization of the universe is delayed, there is therefore an opportunity cost: a potential good, lives worth living, is not being realized. Given some plausible assumptions, this cost is extremely large. However, the lesson for utilitarians is not that we ought to maximize the pace of technological development, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  49.  50
    Pablo Schyfter (2012). Technological Biology? Things and Kinds in Synthetic Biology. Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):29-48.
    Social scientific and humanistic research on synthetic biology has focused quite narrowly on questions of epistemology and ELSI. I suggest that to understand this discipline in its full scope, researchers must turn to the objects of the field—synthetic biological artifacts—and study them as the objects in the making of a science yet to be made. I consider one fundamentally important question: how should we understand the material products of synthetic biology? Practitioners in the field, employing a consistent technological optic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50. Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo (2011). Sacrifice and Repentance as Self-Restraint. Hans Jonas’ Ethics for a Technological Epoch. Toronto Journal of Jewish Thought 3.
    The present article tries to analyze the role played in Hans Jonas’ ethical reflection by religious—namely, Jewish—tradition. Jonas goes in search of an ultimate foundation for his ethics and his theory of the good in order to face the challenges currently posed by technology’s nihilistic attitude towards life and ethics. Jonas’ ethical investigation enters into the domain of metaphysics, which offers an incomparable contribution to the philosophical endeavour, without undermining its overall independence. In this way, Jewish categories—such as remorse, shame, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000