Search results for 'deafness' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Deafness in Philosophy of Mind
  1. Early Onset Deafness (1994). 56 Brendan Monteiro and Emr Critchley. In E. Critchley (ed.), The Neurological Boundaries of Reality. Farrand
     
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  2.  17
    Marvin J. H. Lee, Benjamin Chan & Peter A. Clark (2016). Deafness and Prenatal Testing: A Study Analysis. Internet Journal of Family Practice 14 (1).
    The Deaf culture in the United States is a unique culture that is not widely understood. To members of the Deaf community in the United States, deafness is not viewed as a disease or pathology to be treated or cured; instead it is seen as a difference in human experience. Members of this community do not hide their deafness; instead they take great pride in their Deaf identity. The Deaf culture in the United States is very communitarian not (...)
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  3.  63
    Melissa Seymour Fahmy (2011). On the Supposed Moral Harm of Selecting for Deafness. Bioethics 25 (3):128-136.
    This paper demonstrates that accounting for the moral harm of selecting for deafness is not as simple or obvious as the widespread negative response from the hearing community would suggest. The central questions addressed by the paper are whether our moral disquiet with regard to selecting for deafness can be adequately defended, and if so, what this might entail. The paper considers several different strategies for accounting for the supposed moral harm of selecting for deafness and concludes (...)
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  4.  3
    Rui Nunes (2006). Deafness, Genetics and Dysgenics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):25-31.
    It has been argued by some authors that our reaction to deaf parents who choose deafness for their children ought to be compassion, not condemnation. Although I agree with the reasoning proposed I suggest that this practice could be regarded as unethical. In this article, I shall use the term “dysgenic” as a culturally imposed genetic selection not to achieve any improvement of the human person but to select genetic traits that are commonly accepted as a disabling condition by (...)
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  5. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice: Deafness, Language, and the Senses--A Philosophical History. Metropolitan Books, H. Holt and Co..
    A groundbreaking study of deafness, by a philosopher who combines the scientific erudition of Oliver Sacks with the historical flair of Simon Schama. There is nothing more personal than the human voice, traditionally considered the expression of the innermost self. But what of those who have no voice of their own and cannot hear the voices of others? In this tour de force of historical narrative, Jonathan Ree tells the astonishing story of the deaf, from the sixteenth century to (...)
     
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  6.  4
    E. G. Wever & K. R. Smith (1944). The Problem of Stimulation Deafness. I. Cochlear Impairment as a Function of Tonal Frequency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (3):239.
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  7.  1
    A. H. Holway, R. C. Staton & M. J. Zigler (1940). The Neurophysiology of Hearing: I. The Magnitude of Threshold-Stimuli During Recovery From Stimulation-Deafness. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):669.
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  8.  1
    Kendon R. Smith (1947). The Problem of Stimulation Deafness. II. Histological Changes in the Cochlea as a Function of Tonal Frequency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (4):304.
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  9.  1
    Kendon R. Smith & Ernest Glen Wever (1949). The Problem of Stimulation Deafness. III. The Functional and Histological Effects of a High-Frequency Stimulus. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (2):238.
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  10.  2
    E. H. Kemp (1936). An Experimental Investigation of the Problem of Stimulation Deafness. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (2):159.
  11. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice a Philosophical History of Language, Deafness and the Senses.
     
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  12.  3
    Jonathan Hsy (forthcoming). Symptom and Surface: Disruptive Deafness and Medieval Medical Authority. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    This essay examines constructions of deafness in medieval culture, exploring how deaf experience disrupts authoritative discourses in three textual genres: medical treatise, literary fiction, and autobiographical writing. Medical manuals often present deafness as a physical defect, yet they also suggest how social conditions for deaf people can be transformed in lieu of treatment protocols. Fictional narratives tend to associate deafness with sin or social stigma, but they can also imagine deaf experience with a remarkable degree of sympathy (...)
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  13.  30
    C. Mand, R. E. Duncan, L. Gillam, V. Collins & M. B. Delatycki (2009). Genetic Selection for Deafness: The Views of Hearing Children of Deaf Adults. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):722-728.
    The concept of selecting for a disability, and deafness in particular, has triggered a controversial and sometimes acrimonious debate between key stakeholders. Previous studies have concentrated on the views of the deaf and hard of hearing, health professionals and ethicists towards reproductive selection for deafness. This study, however, is the first of its kind examining the views of hearing children of deaf adults towards preimplantation genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis to select for or against deafness. Hearing children (...)
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  14.  14
    Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin (2013). Human Capabilities, Mild Autism, Deafness and the Morality of Embryo Selection. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):817-824.
    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger’s disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in a (...)
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  15.  27
    Giordana Grossi (1999). Which Phonology? Evidence for a Dissociation Between Articulatory and Auditory Phonology From Word-Form Deafness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):290-291.
    Pulvermüller's Hebbian model implies that an impairment in the word form system will affect phonological articulation and phonological comprehension, because there is only a single representation. Clinical evidence from patients with word-form deafness demonstrates a dissociation between input and output phonologies. These data suggest that auditory comprehension and articulatory production depend on discrete phonological representations localized in different cortical networks.
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  16. Polly Dalton & Nick Fraenkel (2012). Gorillas We Have Missed: Sustained Inattentional Deafness for Dynamic Events. Cognition 124 (3):367-372.
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  17.  19
    Candida C. Peterson & Michael Siegal (2000). Insights Into Theory of Mind From Deafness and Autism. Mind and Language 15 (1):123–145.
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  18.  3
    Emmanuel Dupoux, Sharon Peperkamp & Núria Sebastián-Gallés (2010). Limits on Bilingualism Revisited: Stress ‘Deafness’ in Simultaneous French–Spanish Bilinguals. Cognition 114 (2):266-275.
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  19.  3
    Emmanuel Dupoux, Núria Sebastián-Gallés, Eduardo Navarrete & Sharon Peperkamp (2008). Persistent Stress ‘Deafness’: The Case of French Learners of Spanish. Cognition 106 (2):682-706.
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  20.  50
    Silvia Camporesi (2010). Choosing Deafness with Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: An Ethical Way to Carry on a Cultural Bloodline? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):86.
    These words were written by ethicist Jonathan Glover in his paper “Future People, Disability and Screening” in 1992. Whereas screening and choosing for a disability remained a theoretical possibility 16 years ago, it has now become reality. In 2006, Susannah Baruch and colleagues at John Hopkins University published a survey of 190 American preimplantation genetic diagnosis clinics, and found that 3% reported having the intentional use of PGD “to select an embryo for the presence of a disability.” Even before, in (...)
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  21.  3
    David Poeppel (2001). Pure Word Deafness and the Bilateral Processing of the Speech Code. Cognitive Science 25 (5):679-693.
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  22. Simone Dalla Bella, Magdalena Berkowska & Jakub Sowiński (2011). Disorders of Pitch Production in Tone Deafness. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  23.  30
    N. Levy (2002). Deafness, Culture, and Choice. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):284-285.
    We should react to deaf parents who choose to have a deaf child with compassion not condemnationThere has been a great deal of discussion during the past few years of the potential biotechnology offers to us to choose to have only perfect babies, and of the implications that might have, for instance for the disabled. What few people foresaw is that these same technologies could be deliberately used to ensure that children would be born with disabilities. That this is a (...)
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  24.  16
    Kat R. Agres & Carol L. Krumhansl (2008). Musical Change Deafness: The Inability to Detect Change in a Non-Speech Auditory Domain. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society 969--974.
  25.  44
    Ruth Chadwick & Mairi Levitt (1998). Genetic Technology: A Threat to Deafness. [REVIEW] Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (3):209-215.
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  26.  70
    Grant Allen (1878). Note-Deafness. Mind 3 (10):157-167.
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  27.  16
    Lois I. Nichols (1960). Beethoven and His Deafness. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 35 (1):91-110.
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  28.  52
    Noga Arikha (2005). Deafness, Ideas and the Language of Thought in the Late 1600s. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):233 – 262.
  29.  23
    Edith Simcox & Grant Allen (1878). Note-Deafness. Mind 3 (11):401-404.
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  30.  2
    Timothy Reagan (1989). Nineteenth-Century Conceptions of Deafness: Implications for Contemporary Educational Practice. Educational Theory 39 (1):39-46.
  31.  11
    J. E. Tiles (1992). On Deafness in the Mind's Ear. Tradition and Discovery 18 (3):9-16.
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  32.  4
    Henry M. Wellman & Candida C. Peterson (2013). Theory of Mind, Development, and Deafness. In Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo & Helen Tager-Flusberg (eds.), Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Developmental Social Neuroscience. OUP Oxford 51.
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  33.  3
    Macleod Yearsley (1914). Deafness and its Prevention. The Eugenics Review 6 (2):116.
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  34.  2
    J. E. Tiles (1991). On Deafness in the Mind's Ear: John Dewey and Michael Polanyi. Tradition and Discovery 18 (3):9-16.
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  35.  2
    Tom Shakespeare (1992). Constructing Deafness. Edited by Gregory Susan & Gillian M. Hartley. Pp. 319. (Pinter, and the Open University, 1991.) £35.00 (Hardback); £12.50 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (4):565-566.
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  36.  1
    Gabrielle Hodge (2013). How Deafness May Emerge as a Disability as Social Interactions Unfold. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (3):193-196.
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  37.  6
    Frédéric Isel (2001). How Do We Account for the Absence of “Change Deafness”? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):988-988.
    O'Regan & Noë (O&N) argue that there is no need of internal, more or less picture-like, representation of the visual world in the brain. They propose a new approach in which vision is a mode of exploration of the world that is mediated by knowledge of sensorimotor contingencies. Data obtained in “change blindness” experiments support this assumption.
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  38. Erkin Asutay & Daniel Västfjäll (2014). Emotional Bias in Change Deafness in Multisource Auditory Environments. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (1):27-32.
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  39. Ruth Chadwick & Mairi Levitt, Genetic Technology : A Threat to Deafness?
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  40. Ulrike Domahs, Johannes Knaus, Paula Orzechowska & Richard Wiese (2012). Stress “Deafness” in a Language with Fixed Word Stress: An ERP Study on Polish. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  41. T. V. Mitchell & L. B. Smith (1996). Deafness Drives Development of Attention to Change. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum
     
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  42. F. Murphy (1999). Jonathan Ree, I See a Voice: A Philosophical History of Language, Deafness and the Senses. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (3):426.
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  43. Carol Padden (2008). Writing Deafness (Review). Symploke 16 (1):368-370.
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  44. Joshua Hotaka Roth (2015). Hōkō Onchi: Wayfinding and the Emergence of “Directional Tone-Deafness” in Japan. Ethos 43 (4):402-422.
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  45. Vincent J. Schmithorst, Elena Plante & Scott Holland (2014). Unilateral Deafness in Children Affects Development of Multi-Modal Modulation and Default Mode Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
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  46. Eleanor Stewart-Muirhead (1998). “Fixing” Deafness: Ethical Issues in Cochlear Implantation. Bioethics Bulletin 6 (4).
     
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  47.  69
    Shlomit Harrosh (2011). Identifying Harms. Bioethics 26 (9):493-498.
    Moral disagreements often revolve around the issue of harm to others. Identifying harms, however, is a contested enterprise. This paper provides a conceptual toolbox for identifying harms, and so possible wrongdoing, by drawing several distinctions. First, I distinguish between four modes of human vulnerability, forming four ways in which one can be in a harmed state. Second, I argue for the intrinsic disvalue of harm and so distinguish the presence of harm from the fact that it is instrumental to or (...)
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  48.  6
    Harlan Lane (1963). The Autophonic Scale of Voice Level for Congenitally Deaf Subjects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (4):328.
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  49. Robert Sparrow (2002). Better Off Deaf. Res Publica 11 (1): 11-16.
  50.  18
    Patrick Kermit (2012). Enhancement Technology and Outcomes: What Professionals and Researchers Can Learn From Those Skeptical About Cochlear Implants. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 20 (4):367-384.
    This text presents an overview of the bioethical debate on pediatric cochlear implants and pays particular attention to the analysis of the Deaf critique of implantation. It dismisses the idea that Deaf concerns are primarily about the upholding of Deaf culture and sign language. Instead it is argued that Deaf skepticism about child rehabilitation after cochlear surgery is well founded. Many Deaf people have lived experiences as subjects undergoing rehabilitation. It is not the cochlear technology in itself they view as (...)
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