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  1. Pamela Abbott (2005). An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives. Routledge.
    This third edition of the bestselling An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives confirms the ongoing centrality of feminist perspectives and research to the sociological enterprise and introduces students to the wide range of feminist contributions to key areas of sociological concern. This completely revised edition includes: · new chapters on sexuality and the media · additional material on race and ethnicity, disability and the body · many new international and comparative examples · the influence of theories of globalization and post-colonial (...)
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  2. Joelle M. Abi-Rached (2011). REVIEW: Robert A. Aronowitz. Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):79-82.
    “Breast cancer is all around us.” This is how Robert Aronowitz, a medical doctor, opens his timely Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. We are all familiar with the truism that “one in eight American women” will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. The pink ribbon has come to symbolize both solidarity and hope. Mammograms and “Self-Breast Examination” have become part of women’s daily routine, if not a spectre haunting their daily lives. Yet the evidence (...)
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  3. George J. Agich (2007). Reflections on the Function of Dignity in the Context of Caring for Old People. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (5):483 – 494.
    This article accepts the proposition that old people want to be treated with dignity and that statements about dignity point to ethical duties that, if not independent of rights, at least enhance rights in ethically important ways. In contexts of policy and law, dignity can certainly have a substantive as well as rhetorical function. However, the article questions whether the concept of dignity can provide practical guidance for choosing among alternative approaches to the care of old people. The article explores (...)
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  4. Nicklas A. Akers (2000). Disability & ADA: Disparate Insurance Coverage for Physical and Psychological Disabilities Does Not Violate ADA. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):92-94.
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  5. Barbara Allen, Nancy Meyers, John Sullivan & Melissa Sullivan (2002). American Sign Language and End-of-Life Care: Research in the Deaf Community. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 14 (3):197-208.
    We describe how a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process was used to develop a means of discussing end-of-life care needs of Deaf seniors. This process identified a variety of communication issues to be addressed in working with this special population. We overview the unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of this community and their implications for working with Deaf individuals to provide information for making informed decisions about end-of-life care, including completion of health care directives. Our research and our work with (...)
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  6. Grant Allen (1878). Note-Deafness. Mind 3 (10):157-167.
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  7. Ben Almassi (2010). Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  8. Zac Alstin (2011). Locked-in Happiness. Bioethics Research Notes 23 (1):11.
    Alstin, Zac Results of a Belgian study have revealed that a large number of people suffering from Locked-In Syndrome are happy. Disability is foremost a challenge to one's values, not to our happiness.
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  9. Mithu Alur (2001). Some Cultural and Moral Implications of Inclusive Education in India—a Personal View. Journal of Moral Education 30 (3):287-292.
    This article provides a personal viewpoint on and outline of the author's contribution to learning disability in India. It refers to her doctoral research on policy and the status of people with disability in India. It puts forth the view that although India addresses diversity in many ways it tends to exclude people with disability from national programmes. It argues that inclusive education should be context- and culture-specific and that inclusive programmes can develop, albeit incrementally, despite the fact that systemic (...)
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  10. Ron Amundson (2010). Quality of Life, Disability, and Hedonic Psychology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (4):374-392.
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  11. Ron Amundson (1992). Disability, Handicap, and the Environment. Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (1):105-119.
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  12. Jami L. Anderson (2013). A Dash of Autism. In Jami L. Anderson Simon Cushing (ed.), The Philosophy of Autism.
    In this chapter, I describe my “post-diagnosis” experiences as the parent of an autistic child, those years in which I tried, but failed, to make sense of the overwhelming and often nonsensical information I received about autism. I argue that immediately after being given an autism diagnosis, parents are pressured into making what amounts to a life-long commitment to a therapy program that (they are told) will not only dramatically change their child, but their family’s financial situation and even their (...)
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  13. Jami L. Anderson, Comprehending the Distinctively Sexual Nature of the Conduct. Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll.
    Since the 1970s, sexual assault laws have evolved to include prohibitions of sexual acts with cognitively impaired individuals. The argument justifying this prohibition is typically as follows: A sex act that is forced (without the legally valid consent of) someone is sexual assault. Cognitively impaired individuals, because they lack certain intellectual abilities, cannot give legally valid consent. Therefore, cognitively impaired individuals cannot consent to sex. Therefore, sex acts with cognitively impaired individuals is sexual assault. The prohibition of sex with such (...)
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  14. Jami L. Anderson & Simon Cushing (eds.) (2013). The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Philosophy of Autism examines autism from the tradition of analytic philosophy, working from the premise that so-called autism spectrum disorders raise interesting philosophical questions that need to be and can be addressed in a manner that is clear, jargon-free, and accessible. The goal of the original essays in this book is to provide a philosophically rich analysis of issues raised by autism and to afford dignity and respect to those living with autism by placing it at the center of (...)
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  15. Joel Anderson & Warren Lux (2004). Accurate Self-Assessment, Autonomous Ignorance, and the Appreciation of Disability. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):309-312.
  16. D. Andre-Barron, A. Strydom & A. Hassiotis (2008). What to Tell and How to Tell: A Qualitative Study of Information Sharing in Research for Adults with Intellectual Disability. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):501-506.
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  17. Chrisoula Andreou (2010). Rehabilitating Human Nature. Bioethics 24 (9):461-469.
    I review the main models of disability and introduce a line of reasoning that has been neglected in the debate concerning disability and disadvantage. My reasoning suggests that while disablism can and should be combated, success will require more challenging transformations than those featured in the literature.
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  18. K. W. Anstey (2002). Are Attempts to Have Impaired Children Justifiable? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):286-288.
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  19. Armand H. Matheny Antommaria (2011). Growth Attenuation: To the Editor:To the Editor:To the Editor:To the Editor:Benjamin S. Wilfond Replies Health Outcomes and Social Services. Hastings Center Report 41 (5).
    To the Editor: In the November–December 2010 issue, the Seattle Growth Attenuation and Ethics Working Group (“Navigating Growth Attenuation in Children with Profound Disabilities”) analyzed the arguments for and against growth attenuation in children with permanent, profound intellectual disabilities and identified conditions under which its use may be ethically acceptable. The working group’s conclusion is based on a particular construction of the issue that is not always justified. It focuses on the possibility that growth attenuation will increase children’s involvement in (...)
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  20. Jacob M. Appel (2009). Neonatal Euthanasia: Why Require Parental Consent? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):477-482.
    The Dutch rules governing neonatal euthanasia, known as the Groningen Protocol, require parental consent for severely disabled infants with poor prognoses to have their lives terminated. This paper questions whether parental consent should be dispositive in such cases, and argues that the potential suffering of the neonate or pediatric patient should be the decisive factor under such unfortunate circumstances.
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  21. Gabrielle M. Applebaum & John La Puma (1994). Sterilization and a Mentally Handicapped Minor: Providing Consent for One Who Cannot. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (02):209-.
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  22. Thalia Arawi & Anwar Nassar (2011). Prenatally Diagnosed Foetal Malformations and Termination of Pregnancy: The Case of Lebanon. Developing World Bioethics 11 (1):40-47.
    Termination of pregnancy (TOP) is offered in many countries, for foetuses prenatally diagnosed with congenital malformations that are deemed incompatible with life or that are associated with a high morbidity. In Lebanon, a middle income country where religion plays a focal role, the law prohibits any form of TOP unless it is the only means to save the mother's life. It is the contention of the authors of this article that even if the foetus is a person, if it were (...)
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  23. Noga Arikha (2005). Deafness, Ideas and the Language of Thought in the Late 1600s. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):233 – 262.
  24. Barbara Arneil (2009). Disability, Self Image, and Modern Political Theory. Political Theory 37 (2):218 - 242.
    Charles Taylor argues that recognition begins with the politics of "self-image," as groups represented in the past by others in ways harmful to their own identity replace negative historical self-images with positive ones of their own making. Given the centrality of "self image" to his politics of recognition, it is striking that Taylor, himself, represents disabled people in language that is both limiting and depreciating. The author argues such negative self-images are not unique to Taylor but endemic to modern political (...)
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  25. Richard Arneson, Disability, Priority, and Social Justice.
    Richard J. Arneson version 7/27/99 Is having a disability more like being a member of a racially stigmatized group or like lacking a talent? Both analogies might be apt. The Americans with Disabilities Act stresses the former analogy. The framing thought is that people with disabilities are objects of prejudice and prejudiced behaviors which wrongfully exclude them from participation in important social practices such as the labor market. Think for example of a blind person whose job applications are always automatically (...)
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  26. Richard J. Arneson (1997). Egalitarianism and the Undeserving Poor. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (4):327–350.
    Recently in the U.S. a near-consensus has formed around the idea that it would be desirable to "end welfare as we know it," in the words of President Bill Clinton.1 In this context, the term "welfare" does not refer to the entire panoply of welfare state provision including government sponsored old age pensions, government provided medical care for the elderly, unemployment benefits for workers who have lost their jobs without being fired for cause, or aid to the disabled. "Welfare" in (...)
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  27. Paul Arnold (1993). The Sociomoral Reasoning and Behaviour of Deaf Children. Journal of Moral Education 22 (2):157-166.
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  28. Adrienne Asch (2005). Recognizing Death While Affirming Life: Can End of Life Reform Uphold a Disabled Person's Interest in Continued Life? Hastings Center Report 35 (6 Supplement):s31-s36.
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  29. Adrienne Asch (1998). Distracted by Disability. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (01):77-87.
    People with disabilities use more medical care and see health professionals more often than do those of the same age, ethnic group, or economic class who do not have impairments. An indisputable medical goal is.
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  30. Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein & David T. Wasserman (2008). Criticizing and Reforming Segregated Facilities for Persons with Disabilities. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):157-168.
    In this paper, we critically appraise institutions for people with disabilities, from residential facilities to outpatient clinics to social organizations. While recognizing that a just and inclusive society would reject virtually all segregated institutional arrangements, we argue that in contemporary American society, some people with disabilities may have needs that at this time can best be met by institutional arrangements. We propose ways of reforming institutions to make them less isolating, coercive, and stigmatizing, and to provide forms of social support (...)
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  31. Stephen Ashwal (2003). Medical Aspects of the Minimally Conscious State in Children. Brain and Development 25 (8):535-545.
  32. Jane S. Attanucci * (2004). Questioning Honor: A Parent–Teacher Conflict Over Excellence and Diversity in a USA Urban High School. Journal of Moral Education 33 (1):57-69.
    Parent?teacher relations are often characterized as highly conflictual in the educational literature, with scant empirical evidence of how the disagreements occur in everyday talk. Close analysis of a teacher's account of an intense conflict with a student's mother over the National Honor Society grounds the abstract discourses of merit and difference in the worlds of parents, teachers and students. Narrating primarily through reported speech, in a ?she said, I said? fashion, the teacher recreates her conversations about the National Honor Society (...)
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  33. Laura J. Bach & Anthony S. David (2006). Self-Awareness After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):397-414.
  34. Rajendra D. Badgaiyan (2009). Theory of Mind and Schizophrenia☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):320-322.
    A number of cognitive and behavioral variables influence the performance in tasks of theory of mind (ToM). Since two of the most important variables, memory and explicit expression, are impaired in schizophrenic patients, the ToM appears inconsistent in these patients. An ideal instrument of ToM should therefore account for deficient memory and impaired ability of these patients to explicitly express intentions. If such an instrument is developed, it should provide information that can be used not only to understand the pathophysiology (...)
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  35. Jon S. Bailey (2005). Ethics for Behavior Analysts: A Practical Guide to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board Guidelines for Responsible Conduct. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
    Behavior analysis, a rapidly growing profession, began with the use and application of conditioning and learning techniques to modify the behavior of children or adults presenting severe management problems, often because of developmental disabilities. Now behavior analysts work in a variety of settings, from clinics and schools to workplaces. Especially since their practice often involves aversive stimuli or punishment, they confront many special ethical challenges. Recently, the Behavior Analysis Certification Board codified a set of ten fundamental ethical guidelines to be (...)
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  36. Karen F. Balkin & Robert D. Lane (2005). Assisted Suicide. Greenhaven Press.
    Contributors explore the social, medical, and ethical dilemma of assisted suicide in this revised edition that includes international as well as domestic viewpoints. The federal government's continued challenges to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, the disabled community's response to assisted suicide, and the slippery slope argument are all examined.
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  37. Linda Barclay (2013). Cognitive Impairment and the Right to Vote: A Strategic Approach. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):146-159.
    Most democratic countries either limit or deny altogether voting rights for people with cognitive impairments or mental health conditions. Against this weight of legal and practical exclusion, disability advocacy and developments in international human rights law increasingly push in the direction of full voting rights for people with cognitive impairments. Particularly influential has been the adoption by the UN of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007. Article 29 declares that states must ‘ensure that persons with (...)
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  38. Linda Barclay (2011). Justice and Disability: What Kind of Theorizing Is Needed? Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (3):273-287.
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  39. Linda Barclay (2010). Disability, Respect and Justice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):154-171.
    Recent political philosophers have argued that criteria of social justice that defend distributing resources to individuals on the basis of the disadvantages of their natural endowments are disrespectful and disparaging. Clearly influenced by the social model of disability, Elizabeth Anderson and Thomas Pogge have recently defended criteria of social justice that distribute resources to people with disabilities on the basis of eliminating discrimination, not making up for so-called natural disadvantage. I argue that it is implausible to suggest that just entitlements (...)
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  40. Lizabeth A. Barclay & Karen S. Markel (2009). Ethical Fairness and Human Rights: The Treatment of Employees with Psychiatric Disabilities. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):333 - 345.
    Extant business research has not addressed the ethical treatment of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. This article will describe previous research on individuals with psychiatric disabilities drawn from rehabilitation, psychological, managerial, legal, as well as related business ethics writings before presenting a framework that illustrates the dynamics of (un)ethical behavior in relation to the employment of such individuals. Individuals with psychiatric disabilities often evoke negative reactions from those in their environment. Lastly, we provide recommendations for how employees and organizations can become (...)
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  41. Colin Barnes (2007). Direct Payments and Their Future: An Ethical Concern? Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):348-354.
    Recent policy developments in the general area of disability have presented a whole range of ethical dilemmas for everyone involved in the development and delivery of services for disabled people at the national and local levels. This is almost certainly due to government acceptance of the principles of independent living and the social model of disability, and greater user involvement and control of support services, in particular ?direct payments?. This paper will centre on the ethical concerns that arise from recent (...)
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  42. Elizabeth Barnes (2009). Disability and Adaptive Preference. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):1-22.
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  43. Elizabeth Barnes (2009). Disability, Minority, and Difference. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):337-355.
    abstract In this paper I develop a characterization of disability according to which disability is in no way a sub-optimal feature. I argue, however, that this conception of disability is compatible with the idea that having a disability is, at least in a restricted sense, a harm. I then go on to argue that construing disability in this way avoids many of the common objections levelled at accounts which claim that disability is not a negative feature.
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  44. Paolo Bartolomeo & Sylvie Chokron (2001). Visual Awareness Relies on Exogenous Orienting of Attention: Evidence From Unilateral Neglect. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):975-976.
    Unilateral neglect stems from a relatively selective impairment of exogenous, or stimulus-related, orienting of attention. This neuropsychological evidence parallels “change blindness” experiments, in which normal individuals lack awareness of salient details in the visual scene as a consequence of their attention being exogenously attracted by a competing event, suggesting that visual consciousness requires the integrity of exogenous orienting of attention.
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  45. Dennis Bates, Gloria Durka, Friedrich Schweitzer & John M. Hull (eds.) (2006). Education, Religion and Society: Essays in Honour of John M. Hull. Routledge.
    Education, Religion and Society celebrates the career of Professor John Hull of the University of Birmingham, UK, the internationally renowned religious educationist who has also achieved worldwide fame for his brilliant writings on his experience, mid-career, of total blindness. In his outstanding career he has been a leading figure in the transformation of religious education in English and Welsh state schools from Christian instruction to multi-faith religious education and was the co-founder of the International Seminar on Religious Education and values. (...)
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  46. Antoine Baumann, Frederique Claudot, Gerard Audibert, Paul-Michel Mertes & Louis Puybasset (2011). The Ethical and Legal Aspects of Palliative Sedation in Severely Brain Injured Patients: A French Perspective. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):4-.
    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients (...)
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  47. Michael Bavidge (2006). Under the Floorboards: Examining the Foundations of Mild Cognitive Impairment. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):75-77.
  48. Tim Bayne & Neil Levy (2005). Amputees by Choice: Body Integrity Identity Disorder and the Ethics of Amputation. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):75–86.
    In 1997, a Scottish surgeon by the name of Robert Smith was approached by a man with an unusual request: he wanted his apparently healthy lower left leg amputated. Although details about the case are sketchy, the would-be amputee appears to have desired the amputation on the grounds that his left foot wasn’t part of him – it felt alien. After consultation with psychiatrists, Smith performed the amputation. Two and a half years later, the patient reported that his life had (...)
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  49. Lawrence C. Becker (2005). Reciprocity, Justice, and Disability. Ethics 116 (1):9-39.
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  50. R. P. Behrendt & C. Young (2004). Hallucinations in Schizophrenia, Sensory Impairment, and Brain Disease: A Unifying Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):771-787.
    Based on recent insight into the thalamocortical system and its role in perception and conscious experience, a unified pathophysiological framework for hallucinations in neurological and psychiatric conditions is proposed, which integrates previously unrelated neurobiological and psychological findings. Gamma-frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in networks of thalamocortical circuits, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent gamma oscillations under constraints of afferent sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. If perception is based (...)
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