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  1. Josep Aguiló Regla (2004). La Constitución Del Estado Constitucional. Temis.
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  2. Larry Alexander (2011). Simple-Minded Originalism. In Grant Huscroft & Bradley W. Miller (eds.), The Challenge of Originalism: Essays in Constitutional Theory. Cambridge University Press.
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  3. Larry Alexander (2010). Waluchows —Living Tree Constitutionalism. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (1):93 - 99.
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  4. Larry Alexander (2009). Of Living Trees and Dead Hands: The Interpretation of Constitutions and Constitutional Rights. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 22 (2):227-236.
    The function of law and of constitutional law is to make determinate what we ought to do. And in constitutional law, that is true of both structural provisions and rights provisions. It is not the function of constitutions to establish our real moral rights. We possess those independently of the constitution, which cannot affect them. And all organs of government are bound morally if not legally by those rights. I have taken no position on the relative competence of legislatures and (...)
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  5. Larry Alexander (ed.) (1998). Constitutionalism: Philosophical Foundations. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the second volume in a sub-series of specially commissioned collaborative volumes on key topics at the heart of contemporary philosophy of law that will be appearing regularly within Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Law. A distinguished international team of legal theorists examine the issue of constitutionalism and pose such foundational questions as: why have a constitution? How do we know what the constitution of a country really is? How should a constitution be interpreted? Why should one generation feel (...)
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  6. Larry A. Alexander (2005). Constitutionalism. In Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
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  7. Robert Alexy (2014). Constitutional Rights and Proportionality. Revus 22:51-65.
    There are two basic views concerning the relationship between constitutional rights and proportionality analysis. The first maintains that there exists a necessary connection between constitutional rights and proportionality, the second argues that the question of whether constitutional rights and proportionality are connected depends on what the framers of the constitution have actually decided, that is, on positive law. The first thesis may be termed ‘necessity thesis’, the second ‘contingency thesis’. According to the necessity thesis, the legitimacy of proportionality analysis is (...)
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  8. James Allan (2011). The Curious Concept of the 'Living Tree (or Non-Locked-in) Constitution. In Grant Huscroft & Bradley W. Miller (eds.), The Challenge of Originalism: Essays in Constitutional Theory. Cambridge University Press.
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  9. T. R. S. Allan (2012). Constitutional Rights and the Rule of Law. In Matthias Klatt (ed.), Institutionalized Reason: The Jurisprudence of Robert Alexy. Oxford University Press.
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  10. T. R. S. Allan (2001). Constitutional Justice a Liberal Theory of the Rule of Law.
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  11. Anita L. Allen (1996). Constitutional Law and Privacy. In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
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  12. Michael Allen (2016). Constitutional Fidelity and Extra-Legal Discretion: Justifying Executive Prerogative and Disobedient Disclosure. Law and Philosophy 35 (6):595-614.
    In this article, I defend the justifiability of both concealed uses of executive prerogative as consistent with the end of self-preservation for which government is constituted by the people and its disobedient disclosure as consistent with the rational interest of the citizens of the constitutional state in non-subordination. Indeed, I argue both prerogative and disclosure are justifiable, despite the latter clearly operating at cross-purposes with the former. I also contend that disobedient disclosure aligns more closely with the justificatory conditions of (...)
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  13. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2004). American Constitutionalism. Social Philosophy Today 20:201-205.
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  14. Andrew Arato (2013). Framed. America's 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance. By Sanford Levinson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. [REVIEW] Constellations 20 (3):503-507.
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  15. Andrew Arato (1999). Impeachment or Revision of the Constitution? Constellations 6 (2):145-156.
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  16. Robert S. Barker (2012). Natural Law and the United States Constitution. Review of Metaphysics 66 (1):105-130.
    The United States Constitution was written for the purpose of establishing an effective but limited national government, a government that would be capable of dealing with national and international problems, but that would not be able to violate the traditional liberties of the people. Thus, the Constitution was, and is essentially a practical-juridical document. One should not expect to find there pronouncements about the nature of man, society, law, or the state, such as are often found in many other national (...)
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  17. Elizabeth Beaumont (2010). Dance of the Seven Constitutional Veils: Constitutional Design as Political Choice and Craft. [REVIEW] Political Theory 38 (2):282 - 290.
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  18. Richard Bellamy (ed.) (2006). Constitutionalism and Democracy. Ashgate.
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  19. Oren Ben-Dor (2000). Constitutional Limits and the Public Sphere: A Critical Study of Bentham's Contitutionalism. Hart.
    The central intuition that guides the argument of this book is that both the technical and reductionist methodology associated with utilitarianism do not do ...
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  20. Mitchell N. Berman (2011). Reflective Equilibrium and Constitutional Method. In Grant Huscroft & Bradley W. Miller (eds.), The Challenge of Originalism: Essays in Constitutional Theory. Cambridge University Press.
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  21. Brian H. Bix (2011). Constitutions, Originalism, and Meaning. In Grant Huscroft & Bradley W. Miller (eds.), The Challenge of Originalism: Essays in Constitutional Theory. Cambridge University Press.
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  22. Philip Bobbitt (1996). Constitutional Law and Interpretation. In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
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  23. Jacco Bomhoff, Balancing, the Global and the Local: Judicial Balancing as a Problematic Topic in Comparative (Constitutional) Law.
    Courts in Europe, North-America and elsewhere frequently use the language of 'balancing' when dealing with fundamental rights cases. In addition, judges and scholars increasingly often rely on the image of balancing, or 'weighing', to draw (self-)portraits of legal cultures and to frame contrasts and similarities between legal orders. This article argues that this form of discourse occupies a particularly problematic position as a topic of comparative constitutional law, and this for two primary reasons. First, while balancing references, as legal arguments, (...)
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  24. G. Bongiovanni (2005). Costituzionalismo E Teoria Del Diritto: Sistemi Normativi Contemporanei E Modelli Della Razionalità Giuridica. Laterza.
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  25. Gerard V. Bradley (1998). Review Essay / Criminal Procedure as Constitutional Law. Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (1):58-66.
    Akhil Reed Amar, The Constitution and Criminal Procedure: First Principles New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997, xi + 272 pp.
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  26. Beau Breslin (2009). From Words to Worlds: Exploring Constitutional Functionality. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In the 225 years since the United States Constitution was first drafted, no single book has addressed the key questions of what constitutions are designed to do, how they are structured, and why they matter. In From Words to Worlds, constitutional scholar Beau Breslin corrects this glaring oversight, singling out the essential functions that a modern, written constitution must incorporate in order to serve as a nation's fundamental law. Breslin lays out and explains the basic functions of a modern constitution (...)
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  27. Alan Brudner (2009). Excusing Necessity and Terror: What Criminal Law Can Teach Constitutional Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (2):147-166.
    This essay proposes a theory of excuse that, without blending it into exculpation, avoids the condonation of crime. The question it takes up is: given that neither compulsion by circumstances nor by human threats removes the legal reason for punishing, how can its exonerating force be rendered compatible with the state’s general duty to punish the guilty? The chapter criticizes various proposals for reconciling excuse with the duty to punish the guilty, including the moral involuntariness theory, the concession to frailty (...)
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  28. Alan Brudner (2004). Constitutional Goods. Oxford University Press.
    This book aims to distil the essentials of liberal constitutionalism from the jurisprudence and practice of contemporary liberal-democratic states. Most constitutional theorists have despaired of a liberal consensus on the fundamental goals of constitutional order. Instead they have contented themselves either with agreement on lower-level principles on which those who disagree on fundamentals may coincidentally converge, or, alternatively with a process for translating fundamental disgreement into acceptable laws. Alan Brudner suggests a conception of fundamental justice that liberals of competing philosophic (...)
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  29. John William Burgess (1978). Selections From Political Science and Comparative Constitutional Law. Dabor Social Science Publications.
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  30. Brian E. Butler (2004). Rorty, the First Amendment and Antirealism: Is Reliance Upon Truth Viewpoint-Based Speech Regulation? Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (1):69-88.
    In this article I investigate the implications of antirealism, as characterized by Richard Rorty, for First Amendment jurisprudence under the United States Constitution. It is hoped that the implications, while played out in the context of a specific tradition, will have more universal application. In Section 1, Rorty’s ‘pragmatic antirealism’ is briefly outlined. In Section 2, some effects of the elimination of the concept of truth for First Amendment jurisprudence are investigated. Section 3 argues for the conclusion that given the (...)
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  31. H. G. Callaway (2011). Witherspoon, Edwards and 'Christian Magnanimity'. In K. P. Minkema, A. Neele & K. van Andel (eds.), Jonathan Edwards and Scotland. Dunedin Academic Press. pp. 117-128.
    This paper focuses on John Witherspoon (1723-1794) and the religious background of the American conception of religious liberty and church-state separation, as found in the First Amendment. Witherspoon was strongly influenced by debates and conflicts concerning liberty of conscience and the independence of the congregations in his native Scotland; and he brought to his work, as President of the (Presbyterian) College of New Jersey, a moderate Calvinism challenging the conception of “true virtue” found in Jonathan Edwards. Witherspoon was teacher to (...)
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  32. Radu Carp & Andra Karla Sienerth (2015). Decentralization in Romania: A Constant Failed Reform Under Scrutiny From the Constitutional Limits Perspective. Jurisprudence 21 (4):1208.
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  33. Agostino Carrino (2016). Considérations Critiques Sur la Constitution Et les Droits Dans la Culture Juridique Italienne Contemporaine. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (4):805-822.
    In the following paper is put in question the present-day dominant Italian ideology of the so called ‘new constitutionalism’, which considers human rights as an open-texture catalogue of claims which only the Constitutional Courts are entitled to interpret and implement. This ideology is considered as a tool for overcoming the traditional liberal rule of law in favor a of more and more developed rule of the courts.
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  34. Jim Chen, Daniel A. Farber & Gil Grantmore, Constitutional Law Haiku.
    These con law haiku Tell law with style and rhythm. Download and enjoy.
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  35. Nathaniel Chipman (1833). Principles of Government: A Treatise on Free Institutions, Including the Constitution of the United States. Union, N.J.Lawbook Exchange.
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  36. William E. Connolly (2007). Political Theory and the European Constitution. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (1):120-122.
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  37. Roberto Corona Copado (2007). Las Reglas Del Juego Democrático : La Suprema Corte de Justicia de México En la Solución de Controversias Entre Órganos Del Poder Político Desde 1995. In José Rubio Carrecedo (ed.), Political Philosophy: New Proposals for New Questions: Proceedings of the 22nd Ivr World Congress, Granada 2005, Volume Ii = Filosofía Política: Nuevas Propuestas Para Nuevas Cuestiones. Franz Steiner Verlag.
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  38. Paulo Ferreira da Cunha (2007). Direito Constitucional Aplicado: Viver a Constituição, a Cidadania E Os Direitos Humanos. Quid Juris.
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  39. Perry Dane (1996). Constitutional Law and Religion. In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell.
    This essay on law and religion appears in the second edition of the Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, edited by Dennis Patterson. It is a revision of a similar entry in the book’s first edition. The essay opens by broadly discussing the complex relationships between law and religion writ large as movements in human history – social, cultural, intellectual, and institutional phenomena with distinct but often overlapping logics and concerns. It then hones in on the efforts (...)
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  40. M. de Wilde (2006). Safeguarding the Constitution with and Against Carl Schmitt Constitutional Failure: Carl Schmitt. Political Theory 34 (4):510-515.
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  41. Renaud Dehousse (2006). The Unmaking of a Constitution: Lessons From the European Referenda. Constellations 13 (2):151-164.
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  42. Frederick E. Dessauer (1946). The Constitutional Decision: A German Theory of Constitutional Law and Politics. Ethics 57 (1):14-37.
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  43. Dolores A. Donovan, Informers Revisited: Government Surveillance of Domestic Political Organizations and the Fourth and First Amendments.
    This article uses The Attorney General's Guidelines on General Crimes, Racketeering Enterprise and Domestic Security/Terrorism Investigations (1983) as a springboard for examining the fourth and first amendment implications of government surveillance of domestic political organizations by informers, for exploring the question of whether the surveillance of such groups by informers violates those persons' legitimate expectations of privacy, and for arguing that, since such surveillance not only implicates the fourth amendment but also may have a chilling effect upon the exercise of (...)
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  44. J. P. Dougherty (1986). The Constitution in the Supreme Court. Review of Metaphysics 39 (4):760-761.
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  45. Heinz Duchhardt (1971). Johann Jakob Moser's Constitutional Law (1701–1785). Philosophy and History 4 (1):103-103.
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  46. Rainer Ebert & Reginald M. J. Oduor (2012). The Concept of Human Dignity in German and Kenyan Constitutional Law. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 4 (1):43-73.
    This paper is a historical, legal and philosophical analysis of the concept of human dignity in German and Kenyan constitutional law. We base our analysis on decisions of the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany, in particular its take on life imprisonment and its 2006 decision concerning the shooting of hijacked airplanes, and on a close reading of the Constitution of Kenya. We also present a dialogue between us in which we offer some critical remarks on the concept of human dignity (...)
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  47. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2010). Pluralism and Integrity. Ratio Juris 23 (3):365-389.
    One of the theoretical developments associated with the law of the European Union has been the flourishing of legal and constitutional theories that extol the virtues of pluralism. Pluralism in constitutional theory is offered in particular as a novel argument for the denial of unity within a framework of constitutional government. This paper argues that pluralism fails to respect the value of integrity. It also shows that at least one pluralist theory seeks to overcome the incoherence of pluralism by implicitly (...)
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  48. J. Elkins (2005). Book Review: Constitutional Enactment. [REVIEW] Political Theory 33 (2):280-297.
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  49. Jeremy Elkins (2005). Review: Constitutional Enactment. [REVIEW] Political Theory 33 (2):280 - 297.
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  50. Stanley Fish (2011). The Intentionalist Thesis Once More. In Grant Huscroft & Bradley W. Miller (eds.), The Challenge of Originalism: Essays in Constitutional Theory. Cambridge University Press.
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