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Laurie R. Santos [20]Laurie Santos [5]
  1. Knowledge before belief.Jonathan Phillips, Wesley Buckwalter, Fiery Cushman, Ori Friedman, Alia Martin, John Turri, Laurie Santos & Joshua Knobe - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44:e140.
    Research on the capacity to understand others' minds has tended to focus on representations ofbeliefs,which are widely taken to be among the most central and basic theory of mind representations. Representations ofknowledge, by contrast, have received comparatively little attention and have often been understood as depending on prior representations of belief. After all, how could one represent someone as knowing something if one does not even represent them as believing it? Drawing on a wide range of methods across cognitive science, (...)
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  2.  34
    The origins of belief representation: Monkeys fail to automatically represent others’ beliefs.Alia Martin & Laurie R. Santos - 2014 - Cognition 130 (3):300-308.
  3.  21
    Do non-human primates really represent others’ ignorance? A test of the awareness relations hypothesis.Daniel J. Horschler, Laurie R. Santos & Evan L. MacLean - 2019 - Cognition 190 (C):72-80.
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  4.  34
    Evidence for kind representations in the absence of language: Experiments with rhesus monkeys.Webb Phillips & Laurie R. Santos - 2007 - Cognition 102 (3):455-463.
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  5.  41
    Object individuation using property/kind information in rhesus macaques.Laurie R. Santos, Gregory M. Sulkowski, Geertrui M. Spaepen & Marc D. Hauser - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):241-264.
  6.  19
    What do monkeys know about others’ knowledge?Lindsey A. Drayton & Laurie R. Santos - 2018 - Cognition 170 (C):201-208.
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  7. Spatiotemporal priority as a fundamental principle of object persistence.Jonathan I. Flombaum, Brian J. Scholl & Laurie R. Santos - 2009 - In Bruce M. Hood & Laurie Santos (eds.), The origins of object knowledge. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 135--164.
     
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  8.  60
    Ecology, domain specificity, and the origins of theory of mind: Is competition the catalyst?Derek E. Lyons & Laurie R. Santos - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (5):481–492.
    In the nearly 30 years since Premack and Woodruff famously asked, “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?”, the question of exactly how much non‐human primates understand about the mental lives of others has had an unusually dramatic history. As little as ten years ago it appeared that the answer would be a simple one, with early investigations of non‐human primates’ mentalistic abilities yielding a steady stream of negative findings. Indeed, by the mid‐1990s even very cautious researchers were ready (...)
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  9.  42
    Core knowledge and its limits: The domain of food.Kristin Shutts, Kirsten F. Condry, Laurie R. Santos & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2009 - Cognition 112 (1):120-140.
  10.  27
    Domain-specific knowledge in human children and non-human primates: Artifacts and foods.Laurie R. Santos, Marc D. Hauser & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2002 - In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 205--216.
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  11.  20
    Do Dogs Prefer Helpers in an Infant-Based Social Evaluation Task?Katherine McAuliffe, Michael Bogese, Linda W. Chang, Caitlin E. Andrews, Tanya Mayer, Aja Faranda, J. Kiley Hamlin & Laurie R. Santos - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  12.  7
    Recognition and categorization of biologically significant objects by rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): the domain of food.Laurie R. Santos, Marc D. Hauser & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2001 - Cognition 82 (2):127-155.
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  13.  16
    Ecology, Domain Specificity, and the Origins of Theory of Mind: Is Competition the Catalyst?Derek E. Lyons & Laurie R. Santos - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (5):481-492.
    In the nearly 30 years since Premack and Woodruff famously asked, “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?”, the question of exactly how much non-human primates understand about the mental lives of others has had an unusually dramatic history. As little as ten years ago it appeared that the answer would be a simple one, with early investigations of non-human primates’ mentalistic abilities yielding a steady stream of negative findings. Indeed, by the mid-1990s even very cautious researchers were ready (...)
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  14. The evolutionary ancestry of our knowledge of tools: from percepts to concepts.Marc D. Hauser & Laurie R. Santos - 2007 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press. pp. 267--288.
     
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  15.  45
    Another way to learn about teaching: What dogs can tell us about the evolution of pedagogy.Angie M. Johnston, Katherine McAuliffe & Laurie R. Santos - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  16.  29
    Motivation is not enough.Derek E. Lyons, Webb Phillips & Laurie R. Santos - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):708-708.
    Tomasello et al. provide a new account of cultural uniqueness, one that hinges on a uniquely human motivation to share intentionality with others. We favor an alternative to this motivational account – one that relies on a modular explanation of the primate intention-reading system. We discuss this view in light of recent comparative experiments using competitive intention-reading tasks.
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  17.  40
    Lab support for strong reciprocity is weak: Punishing for reputation rather than cooperation.Alex Shaw & Laurie Santos - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (1):39-39.
    Strong reciprocity is not the only account that can explain costly punishment in the lab; it can also be explained by reputation-based accounts. We discuss these two accounts and suggest what kinds of evidence would support the two different alternatives. We conclude that the current evidence favors a reputation-based account of costly punishment.
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  18.  7
    When Naïve Pedagogy Breaks Down: Adults Rationally Decide How to Teach, but Misrepresent Learners’ Beliefs.Rosie Aboody, Joey Velez-Ginorio, Laurie R. Santos & Julian Jara-Ettinger - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (3):e13257.
    From early in childhood, humans exhibit sophisticated intuitions about how to share knowledge efficiently in simple controlled studies. Yet, untrained adults often fail to teach effectively in real‐world situations. Here, we explored what causes adults to struggle in informal pedagogical exchanges. In Experiment 1, we first showed evidence of this effect, finding that adult participants failed to communicate their knowledge to naïve learners in a simple teaching task, despite reporting high confidence that they taught effectively. Using a computational model of (...)
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  19.  15
    Capuchin monkeys do not show human-like pricing effects.Rhia Catapano, Nicholas Buttrick, Jane Widness, Robin Goldstein & Laurie R. Santos - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:111567.
    Recent work in judgment and decision-making has shown that a good’s price can have irrational effects on people’s preferences. People tend to prefer goods that cost more money and assume that such expensive goods will be more effective, even in cases where the price of the good is itself arbitrary. Although much work has documented the existence of these pricing effects, unfortunately little work has addressed where these price effects come from in the first place. Here we use a comparative (...)
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  20.  23
    The origins of object knowledge.Bruce M. Hood & Laurie Santos (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Do humans start life with the capacity to detect and mentally represent the objects around them? Or is our object knowledge instead derived only as the result of prolonged experience with the external world? Are we simply able to perceive objects by watching their actions in the world, or do we have to act on objects ourselves in order to learn about their behavior? Finally, do we come to know all aspects of objects in the same way, or are some (...)
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  21.  10
    How do non-human primates represent others' awareness of where objects are hidden?Daniel J. Horschler, Laurie R. Santos & Evan L. MacLean - 2021 - Cognition 212 (C):104658.
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  22.  22
    Understanding the role of mirror neurons in action understanding will require more than a domain-general account.Alia Martin & Laurie R. Santos - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):211-211.
  23.  23
    Object representation as a central issue in cognitive science.Laurie R. Santos & Bruce M. Hood - 2009 - In Bruce M. Hood & Laurie Santos (eds.), The origins of object knowledge. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 1--23.
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  24. The Evolution of Irrationality: Insights from Non-human Primates.Laurie Santos - 2007 - In Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology:Volume 2: Volume 2. Oxford University Press.
     
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  25. The Evolution of Irrationality: Insights from Non-human Primates.Laurie Santos - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Epistemology 2:87-107.
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