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Sheila McLean [9]Sheila A. M. McLean [6]
  1.  60
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 reviews the (...)
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  2. Autonomy, Consent and the Law.Sheila McLean - 2009 - Routledge-Cavendish.
    From Hippocrates to paternalism to autonomy : the new hegemony -- From autonomy to consent -- Consent, autonomy, and the law -- Autonomy at the end of life -- Autonomy and pregnancy -- Autonomy and genetic information -- Autonomy and organ transplantation -- Autonomy, consent, and the law.
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  3. Medicine, Morals and the Law.Sheila McLean & Gerry Maher - 1983 - Gower Publishing Company.
    Topics discussed in this work are abortion, euthanasia, medical negligence and human experimentation.
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  4. Clinical Ethics Consultation in the United Kingdom.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2009 - Diametros 22:76 – 89.
    The system of clinical ethics committees (CECs) in the United Kingdom is based on goodwill. No formal requirements exist as to constitution, membership, range of expertise or the status of their recommendations. Healthcare professionals are not obliged to use CECs where they exist, nor to follow any advice received. In addition, the make-up of CECs suggests that ethics itself may be under-represented. In most cases, there is one member with a training in ethics – the rest are healthcare professionals or (...)
     
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  5. Death, Dying, and the Law.Sheila McLean - 1996 - Dartmouth Publishing Company.
    Issues surrounding the end of life, and in particular questions of patient choice, have seldom been so high on the legal, ethical and political agenda. This book examines these issues from a comparative perspective, drawing conclusions about the role of the doctor, the individual and the law-makers in this moral minefield.
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  6.  25
    Impairment and Disability: Law and Ethics at the Beginning and End of Life.Sheila McLean - 2007 - Routledge-Cavendish.
    pt. 1. Background you need. -- What is brain-compatible teaching -- The old and new of it -- When brain research is applied to the classroom everything will change -- Change can be easy -- We're not in Kansas anymore -- Where's the proof -- Tools for exploring the brain -- Ten reasons to care about brain research -- The evolution of brain models -- Be a brain-smart consumer: recognizing good research -- Action or theory: who wants to read all (...)
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  7. Is There a Legal Threat to Medicine? The Case of Anthony Bland.Sheila A. M. Mclean - 1994
     
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  8. Old Law, New Medicine Medical Ethics and Human Rights.Sheila Mclean - 1999
     
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  9.  28
    The Regulation of Xenotransplantation in the United Kingdom After UKXIRA: Legal and Ethical Issues.Laura Williamson, Marie Fox & Sheila McLean - manuscript
    Xenotransplantation - the transfer of living tissue between species - has long been heralded as a potential solution to the severe organ shortage crisis experienced by the United Kingdom and other 'developed' nations. However, the significant risks which accompany this biotechnology led the United Kingdom to adopt a cautious approach to its regulation, with the establishment of a non-departmental public body - UKXIRA - to oversee the development of this technology on a national basis. In December 2006 UKXIRA was quietly (...)
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  10.  19
    A Patient's Right to Know: Information Disclosure, the Doctor and the Law.Sheila McLean - unknown
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  11.  20
    Human Rights and Bioethics.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 658 (663):660.
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  12.  4
    Contemporary Issues in Law, Medicine and Ethics.Sheila McLean - 1996 - Ashgate Publishing, Ltd..
    The rapidly changing face of modern medicine and the increasing involvement of public debate in its practice, are reflected in the wide range of contributions to this book, which takes a searching look at the issues which are currently at the forefront of modern debate in medical ethics and the law.
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  13.  15
    Regulating Research and Experimentation: A View From the UK.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):604-612.
    A medical profession which did not seek improved means to conquer disease would be condemned for dereliction of its duty, Members of the public will not accept the current state of the medical arts as finite but feel justified in expecting the development of more effective therapies for illness, and the promotion of improved means of preventive care.With this assertion, the distinguished academic, Bernard Dickens, places research firmly in the domain of the public interest. Foster agrees, saying that, “[t]o improve (...)
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  14.  4
    The Gene Genie: Good Fairy or Wicked Witch?Sheila Mclean - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (4):723-739.
    The so-called genetics revolution rests on a history which at its least can be described as controversial. Modern genetics needs to bear this history in mind. In particular, as with the past, the area of reproductive choice seems particularly vulnerable to potential abuse. Courts in the UK and elsewhere have already shown themselves willing to interfere with the choices of women in the management of their pregnancies. Medical advance, perhaps particularly the capacity to visualise the developing foetus, has added complexity (...)
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  15.  6
    Regulating Research and Experimentation: A View From the UK.Sheila A. M. McLean - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):604-612.
    A medical profession which did not seek improved means to conquer disease would be condemned for dereliction of its duty, Members of the public will not accept the current state of the medical arts as finite but feel justified in expecting the development of more effective therapies for illness, and the promotion of improved means of preventive care.With this assertion, the distinguished academic, Bernard Dickens, places research firmly in the domain of the public interest. Foster agrees, saying that, “[t]o improve (...)
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