Search results for 'Animal communication Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  33
    Daisie M. Radner (1999). Mind and Function in Animal Communication. Erkenntnis 51 (1):633-648.
    Functional hypotheses about animal signalling often refer to mental states of the sender or the receiver. Mental states are functional categorizations of neurophysiological states. Functional questions about animal signals are intertwined with causal questions. This interrelationship is illustrated in regard to avian distraction displays. In purposive signalling, the sender has a goal of influencing the behavior of the receiver. Purposive signalling is innovative if the sender's goal is unrelated to the biological function of the signal. This may be (...)
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  2.  24
    Pietro Perconti (2002). Context-Dependence in Human and Animal Communication. Foundations of Science 7 (3):341-362.
    The aim of this paper is to show that humanlanguage is context-dependent in a veryspecific way. In order to support this thesis,a detailed comparison is made between the waysin which verbal expressions depend on thecontext of occurrence and evaluation and animalcommunication systems. The comparisonhighlights a series of analogies anddifferences between human language and thecommunication systems of other animals. Myproposal is to use the term `indexicality' toindicate the characteristic way of using thecontext in human language and to use the moregeneral phrase (...)
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  3.  24
    G. Greenberg & E. Tobach (eds.) (1987). Cognition, Language, and Consciousness: Integrative Levels. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    "Each animal in its own psychological setting . . / 1 Gerard Piel Scientific American, New York TC Schneirla was more interested in questions than in ...
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  4. Andrew McAninch, Grant Goodrich & Colin Allen (2009). Animal Communication and Neo-Expressivism. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press 128--144.
    One of the earliest issues in cognitive ethology concerned the meaning of animal signals. In the 1970s and 1980s this debate was most active with respect to the question of whether animal alarm calls convey information about the emotional states of animals or whether they “refer” directly to predators in the environment (Seyfarth, Cheney, & Marler 1980; see Radick 2007 for a historical account), but other areas, such as vocalizations about food and social contact, were also widely discussed. (...)
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  5.  2
    Michael J. Ryan, Nicole M. Kime & Gil G. Rosenthal (1998). Patterns of Evolution in Human Speech Processing and Animal Communication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):282-283.
    We consider Sussman et al. 's suggestion that auditory biases for processing low-noise relationships among pairs of acoustic variables is a preadaptation for human speech processing. Data from other animal communication systems, especially those involving sexual selection, also suggest that neural biases in the receiver system can generate strong selection on the form of communication signals.
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  6.  8
    Helena Telkänranta (2009). Conditioning or Cognition? Understanding Interspecific Communication as a Way of Improving Animal Training (a Case Study with Elephants in Nepal). Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):542-555.
    When animals are trained to function in a human society (for example, pet dogs, police dogs, or sports horses), different trainers and training cultures vary widely in their ability to understand how the animal perceives the communication efforts of the trainer. This variation has considerable impact on the resulting performance and welfare of the animals. There are many trainers who frequently resort to physical punishment or other pain-inflicting methods when the attempts to communicate have failed or when the (...)
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  7.  1
    Michael Philips & S. N. Austad (1996). Animal Communication and Social Evolution. In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press 257--267.
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  8.  31
    Michael Owren, Drew Rendall & Michael Ryan (2010). Redefining Animal Signaling: Influence Versus Information in Communication. Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):755-780.
    Researchers typically define animal signaling as morphology or behavior specialized for transmitting encoded information from a signaler to a perceiver. Although intuitively appealing, this conception is inherently metaphorical and leaves concepts of both information and encoding undefined. To justify relying on the information construct, theorists often appeal to Shannon and Weaver’s quantitative definition. The two approaches are, however, fundamentally at odds. The predominant definition of animal signaling is thus untenable, which has a number of undesirable consequences for both (...)
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  9.  3
    Daniel L. Bowling & W. Tecumseh Fitch (2015). Do Animal Communication Systems Have Phonemes? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (10):555-557.
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  10.  3
    Cristopher S. Evans & Peter Marler (1995). Language and Animal Communication: Parallels and Contrasts. In H. Roitblat & Jean-Arcady Meyer (eds.), Comparative Approaches to Cognitive Science. MIT Press 341--382.
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  11.  5
    W. John Smith (1991). Animal Communication and the Study of Cognition. In C. A. Ristau (ed.), Cognitive Ethology: The Minds of Other Animals. Lawrence Erlbaum 209--230.
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  12.  34
    E. Benveniste (1953). Animal Communication and Human Language: The Language of the Bees. Diogenes 1 (1):1-7.
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  13.  1
    Jack P. Hailman, Millicent S. Ficken & Robert W. Ficken (1985). The ‘Chick-a-Dee’ Calls of Parus Atricapillus: A Recombinant System of Animal Communication Compared with Written English. Semiotica 56 (3-4):191-224.
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  14.  4
    Daisie M. Radner (1993). Directed Action and Animal Communication. Ration 6 (2):135-54.
  15.  2
    Yoram S. Carmeli (2003). On Human-to-Animal Communication: Biosemiotics and Folk Perceptions in Zoos and Circuses. Semiotica 2003 (146).
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  16.  3
    Ephraim Nissan (2009). Peter McGregor ,Animal Communication.Tristram D. Wyatt, Pheromones and Animal Behaviour: Communicationby Smell and Taste.Networks. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 17 (2):482-490.
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  17.  2
    Chris Mortensen (1993). Private States and Animal Communication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):658.
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  18.  2
    Selmer Bringsjord & Elizabeth Bringsjord (1993). Animal Communication of Private States Does Not Illuminate the Human Case. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):645.
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  19. M. Naguib (2006). Animal Communication: Overview. In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier 276--284.
     
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  20. W. Keith Percival (1982). An Eighteenth-Century View of Animal Communication. Semiotica 39 (1-2).
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  21. Daisie Radner (1993). Directed Action and Animal Communication. Ratio 6 (2):135-154.
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  22.  28
    Achim Stephan (1999). Introduction: Animal Beliefs, Concepts, and Communication. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 51 (1):1-6.
  23. T. Milstein (2007). Animal Discourse: How Human Communication Informs and Shapes the Human Relationship with Other Animals. In M. Bekoff (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human-Animal Relationships. Greenwood Press
     
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  24.  1
    Norbert Wiener (1949). Cybernetics. Or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine. Journal of Philosophy 46 (22):736-737.
  25.  10
    N. E. (1949). Cybernetics. Or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 46 (22):736-737.
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  26.  9
    Michael J. Ryan (2010). Redefining Animal Signaling: Influence Versus Information in Communication. Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):755-780.
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  27.  4
    Alonzo Church (1949). Review: Norbert Wiener, Cybernetics. Or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 14 (2):127-127.
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  28.  1
    S. Plous (1993). Animal Models of Human Communication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):660.
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  29.  1
    N. I. Žinkin (1971). Semiotic Aspects of Communication in Animal and Man. Semiotica 4 (1).
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  30. Vanessa O. Ezenwa & Allison E. Williams (2014). Microbes and Animal Olfactory Communication: Where Do We Go From Here? Bioessays 36 (9):847-854.
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  31. Thomas A. Sebeok (1967). The Informational Model of Language: Analog and Digital Coding in Animal and Human Communication (an Excerpt). In Donald C. Hildum (ed.), Language and Thought: An Enduring Problem in Psychology. London,: Van Nostrand, 37--40.
     
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  32. Helena Telkänranta (2009). Conditioning or Cognition? Understanding Interspecific Communication as a Way of Improving Animal Training (a Case Study with Elephants in Nepal. Sign Systems Studies 3:542-557.
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  33.  45
    David Premack (1986). Gavagai! Or the Future History of the Animal Language Controversy. MIT Press.
  34. Donald R. Griffin (2001). Animal Minds: Beyond Cognition to Consciousness. University of Chicago Press.
    Finally, in four chapters greatly expanded for this edition, Griffin considers the latest scientific research on animal consciousness, pro and con, and...
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  35. Donald R. Griffin & G. B. Speck (2004). New Evidence of Animal Consciousness. Animal Cognition 7 (1):5-18.
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  36.  10
    Lori Brown (2007). Becoming-Animal in the Flesh: Expanding the Ethical Reach of Deleuze and Guattari's Tenth Plateau. Phaenex 2 (2):260-278.
    Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s notion of becoming-animal offers a mode of interaction that goes beyond the symbolic language and conceptual thought that are often used in the western philosophical tradition to circumscribe the limits and define the nature of an ethical engagement. They fail, however, to provide a robust account of how becoming may yield an ethical exchange between the human being and the animal other. In order for this process to generate such an outcome, it must (...)
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  37.  20
    Ramon Ferrer‐I.‐Cancho, Antoni Hernández‐Fernández, David Lusseau, Govindasamy Agoramoorthy, Minna J. Hsu & Stuart Semple (2013). Compression as a Universal Principle of Animal Behavior. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1565-1578.
    A key aim in biology and psychology is to identify fundamental principles underpinning the behavior of animals, including humans. Analyses of human language and the behavior of a range of non-human animal species have provided evidence for a common pattern underlying diverse behavioral phenomena: Words follow Zipf's law of brevity (the tendency of more frequently used words to be shorter), and conformity to this general pattern has been seen in the behavior of a number of other animals. It has (...)
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  38.  1
    María Teresa Pozzoli (2003). El sujeto frente al fenómeno animal. Hacia una mirada integradora desde el nuevo paradigma de la complejidad. Polis 6.
    La autora argumenta que la experiencia de vincularse con un animal desde cierta paridad -como ‘tutor-amigo’ de una mascota-, es una de las experiencias vinculares más significativas en la comunicación humano/animal, y que ella muestra la artificialidad de las barreras que la sociedad erige frente al fenómeno animal. Desarrolla en el artículo el imaginario psico-social en torno a los animales, su investidura significante para la existencia humana, con virtudes elevadas a la vez que como un habitante amenazante (...)
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  39.  56
    Richard Moore, Josep Call & Michael Tomasello (2015). Production and Comprehension of Gestures Between Orang-Utans (Pongo Pygmaeus) in a Referential Communication Game. PLoS ONE:pone.0129726.
    Orang-utans played a communication game in two studies testing their ability to produce and comprehend requestive pointing. While the ‘communicator’ could see but not obtain hidden food, the ‘donor’ could release the food to the communicator, but could not see its location for herself. They could coordinate successfully if the communicator pointed to the food, and if the donor comprehended his communicative goal and responded pro-socially. In Study 1, one orang-utan pointed regularly and accurately for peers. However, they responded (...)
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  40.  4
    David Lubinski & Travis Thompson (1993). Species and Individual Differences in Communication Based on Private States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):627.
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  41. Donald D. Weiss (1975). Professor Malcolm on Animal Intelligence. Philosophical Review 84 (January):88-95.
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  42.  14
    M. C. Bettoni (2007). The Yerkish Language: From Operational Methodology to Chimpanzee Communication. Constructivist Foundations 2 (2-3):32-38.
    Purpose: Yerkish is an artificial language created in 1971 for the specific purpose of exploring the linguistic potential of nonhuman primates. The aim of this paper is to remind the research community of some important issues and concepts related to Yerkish that seem to have been forgotten or appear to be distorted. These are, particularly, its success, its promising aspects for future research and last but not least that it was Ernst von Glasersfeld who invented Yerkish: he coined the term (...)
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  43. Richard Moore (2013). Evidence and Interpretation in Great Ape Gestural Communication. Humana.Mente 24:27-51.
    Tomasello and colleagues have offered various arguments to explain why apes find the comprehension of pointing difficult. They have argued that: (i) apes fail to understand communicative intentions; (ii) they fail to understand informative, cooperative communication, and (iii) they fail to track the common ground that pointing comprehension requires. In the course of a review of the literature on apes' production and comprehension of pointing, I reject (i) and (ii), and offer a qualified defence of (iii). Drawing on work (...)
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  44. Stanley Deetz (ed.) (1981). Phenomenology in Rhetoric and Communication. Center for Advanced Research in Phenomenoloy & University Press of America.
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  45. Carl Heinz Heidrich (ed.) (1974). Semantics and Communication. New York,American Elsevier Pub. Co..
     
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  46. Joseph J. Pilotta (ed.) (1982). Interpersonal Communication: Essays in Phenomenology and Hermeneutics. University Press of America.
     
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  47.  9
    Gregory Radick (2005). Primate Language and the Playback Experiment, in 1890 and 1980. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):461-493.
    The playback experiment -- the playing back of recorded animal sounds to the animals in order to observe their responses -- has twice become central to celebrated researches on non-human primates. First, in the years around 1890, Richard Garner, an amateur scientist and evolutionary enthusiast, used the new wax cylinder phonograph to record and reproduce monkey utterances with the aim of translating them. Second, in the years around 1980, the ethologists Peter Marler, Robert Seyfarth, and Dorothy Cheney used tape (...)
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  48.  32
    Ulrich E. Stegmann (2005). John Maynard Smith's Notion of Animal Signals. Biology and Philosophy 20 (5):1011-1025.
    This paper explores John Maynard Smith’s conceptual work on animal signals. Maynard Smith defined animal signals as traits that (1) change another organism’s behaviour while benefiting the sender, that (2) are evolved for this function, and that (3) have their effects through the evolved response of the receiver. Like many ethologists, Maynard Smith assumed that animal signals convey semantic information. Yet his definition of animal signals remains silent on the nature of semantic information and on the (...)
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  49.  3
    Sławomir Wacewicz & Przemysław Żywiczyński (2015). Language Evolution: Why Hockett’s Design Features Are a Non-Starter. Biosemiotics 8 (1):29-46.
    The set of design features developed by Charles Hockett in the 1950s and 1960s remains probably the most influential means of juxtaposing animal communication with human language. However, the general theoretical perspective of Hockett is largely incompatible with that of modern language evolution research. Consequently, we argue that his classificatory system—while useful for some descriptive purposes—is of very limited use as a theoretical framework for evolutionary linguistics. We see this incompatibility as related to the ontology of language, i.e. (...)
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  50.  5
    Erika Ruonakoski (2012). Literature as a Means of Communication: A Beauvoirian Interpretation of an Ancient Greek Poem. Sapere Aude 3 (6):21.
    The aim of this article is twofold. Firstly, it explicates Simone de Beauvoir’s views on literature as a means of communication. Secondly, it draws from her theoretical framework to illuminate the discussion on mortality and death in a poem by an ancient Greek woman epigrammatist, Anyte. These two goals are combined by the fact that for Beauvoir one of the most important tasks of literature was to break down the solitude of human existence by sharing the most intimate and (...)
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