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Clare Palmer [64]Clare A. Palmer [11]Clare Alexandra Palmer [1]
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Profile: Clare Alexandra Palmer (Texas A&M University)
  1.  7
    Clare Palmer (2010). Animal Ethics in Context. Columbia University Press.
    It is widely agreed that because animals feel pain we should not make them suffer gratuitously. Some ethical theories go even further: because of the capacities that they possess, animals have the right not to be harmed or killed. These views concern what not to do to animals, but we also face questions about when we should, and should not, assist animals that are hungry or distressed. Should we feed a starving stray kitten? And if so, does this commit us, (...)
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  2. Clare Palmer (2009). Harm to Species? Species, Ethics, and Climate Change: The Case of the Polar Bear. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 23 (2):587-604.
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  3.  38
    Clare Palmer (2011). Animal Disenhancement and the Non-Identity Problem: A Response to Thompson. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (1):43-48.
    In his paper The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem (Nanoethics 2:305–316, 2008) Paul Thompson argues that the possibility of disenhancing animals in order to improve animal welfare poses a philosophical conundrum. Although many people intuitively think such disenhancement would be morally impermissible, it’s difficult to find good arguments to support such intuitions. In this brief response to Thompson, I accept that there’s a conundrum here. But I argue that if we seriously consider whether creating beings (...)
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  4. Albert Borgmann, Holly Jean Buck, Wylie Carr, Forrest Clingerman, Maialen Galarraga, Benjamin Hale, Marion Hourdequin, Ashley Mercer, Konrad Ott, Clare Palmer, Ronald Sandler, Patrick Taylor Smith, Bronislaw Szerszynski & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. Lexington Books.
    Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management is a wide-ranging and expert analysis of the ethics of the intentional management of solar radiation. This book will be a useful tool for policy-makers, a provocation for ethicists, and an eye-opening analysis for both the scientist and the general reader with interest in climate change.
     
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  5.  49
    Clare Palmer (2012). Does Breeding a Bulldog Harm It? Animal Welfare 21:157-166.
    It is frequently claimed that breeding animals that we know will have unavoidable health problems is at least prima facie wrong, because it harms the animals concerned. However, if we take ‘harm’ to mean ‘makes worse off’, this claim appears false. Breeding an animal that will have unavoidable health problems does not make any particular individual animal worse off, since an animal bred without such problems would be a different individual animal. Yet, the intuition that there is something ethically wrong (...)
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  6.  16
    Clare Palmer, Laura Zapparoli & James M. Kilner (forthcoming). A New Framework to Explain Sensorimotor Beta Oscillations. Trends in Cognitive Sciences.
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  7.  4
    Clare Palmer (2016). Saving Species but Losing Wildness: Should We Genetically Adapt Wild Animal Species to Help Them Respond to Climate Change? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):234-251.
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  8.  33
    Clare Palmer (2011). Place-Historical Narratives: Road—or Roadblock—to Sustainability? Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (3):345 - 359.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 345-359, October 2011.
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  9.  88
    Clare Palmer (2001). “Taming the Wild Profusion of Existing Things”?: A Study of Foucault, Power, and Human/Animal Relationships. Environmental Ethics 23 (4):339-358.
    I explore how some aspects of Foucoult’s work on power can be applied to human/animal power relations. First, I argue that because animals behave as “beings that react” and can respond in different ways to human actions, in principle at least, Foucoult’s work can offer insights into human/animal power relations. However, many of these relations fall into the category of “domination,” in which animals are unable to respond. Second, I examine different kinds of human power practices, in particular, ways in (...)
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  10.  26
    Peter Sandøe, Paul M. Hocking, Bjorn Förkman, Kirsty Haldane, Helle H. Kristensen & Clare Palmer (2014). The Blind Hens' Challenge: Does It Undermine the View That Only Welfare Matters in Our Dealings with Animals? Environmental Values 23 (6):727-742.
    Animal ethicists have recently debated the ethical questions raised by disenhancing animals to improve their welfare. Here, we focus on the particular case of breeding hens for commercial egg-laying systems to become blind, in order to benefit their welfare. Many people find breeding blind hens intuitively repellent, yet ‘welfare-only’ positions appear to be committed to endorsing this possibility if it produces welfare gains. We call this the ‘Blind Hens’ Challenge’. In this paper, we argue that there are both empirical and (...)
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  11.  16
    Clare Palmer & Peter Sandoe (2014). For Their Own Good: Captive Cats and Routine Confinement. In Lori Gruen (ed.), Ethics of Captivity. Oxford University Press 135-155.
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  12.  22
    Clare A. Palmer (2012). What (If Anything) Do We Owe Wild Animals? Between the Species 16 (1):4.
    It’s widely agreed that animal pain matters morally – that we shouldn’t, for instance, starve our animal companions, and that we should provide medical care to sick or injured agricultural animals, and not only because it benefits us to do so. But do we have the same moral responsibilities towards wild animals? Should we feed them if they are starving, and intervene to prevent them from undergoing other forms of suffering, for instance from predation? Using an example that includes both (...)
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  13.  15
    Clare Palmer, Katie McShane & Ron Sandler (2014). Environmental Ethics. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 39:419-442.
    Environmental ethics—the study of ethical questions raised by human relations with the nonhuman environment—emerged as an important subfield of philosophy during the 1970s. It is now a flourishing area of research. This article provides a review of the secular, Western traditions in the field. It examines both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric claims about what has value, as well as divergent views about whether environmental ethics should be concerned with bringing about best consequences, respecting principles and rights, or embodying environmental virtues. The (...)
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  14.  9
    Clare Palmer (2011). The Moral Relevance of the Distinction Between Domesticated and Wild Animals. In Tom Beauchamp & R. G. Frey (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Oxford University Press 701-725.
    This article considers whether a morally relevant distinction can be drawn between wild and domesticated animals. The term “wildness” can be used in several different ways, only one of which (constitutive wildness, meaning an animal that has not been domesticated by being bred in particular ways) is generally paired and contrasted with“domesticated.” Domesticated animals are normally deliberately bred and confined. One of the article's arguments concerns human initiatives that establish relations with animals and thereby change what is owed to these (...)
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  15.  24
    Doris Schroeder & Clare Palmer (2003). Technology Assessment and the 'Ethical Matrix'. Poiesis and Praxis 1 (4):295-307.
    This paper explores the usefulness of the 'ethical matrix', proposed by Ben Mepham, as a tool in technology assessment, specifically in food ethics. We consider what the matrix is, how it might be useful as a tool in ethical decision-making, and what drawbacks might be associated with it. We suggest that it is helpful for fact-finding in ethical debates relating to food ethics; but that it is much less helpful in terms of weighing the different ethical problems that it uncovers. (...)
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  16.  51
    Clare Palmer (2013). Companion Cats as Co-Citizens? Comments on Sue Donaldson ' s and Will Kymlicka ' s Zoopolis. Dialogue 52 (4):1-9.
  17.  17
    Clare Palmer (2006). Killing Animals in Animal Shelters. In The Animal Studies Group (ed.), Killing Animals. Illinois University Press 170-187.
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  18.  26
    Clare Palmer (2000). Religion in the Making? Animality, Savagery, and Civilization in the Work of A. N. Whitehead. Society and Animals 8 (3):287-304.
    Constructions of the animal and animality are often pivotal to religious discourses. Such constructions create the possibility of identifying and valuing what is "human" as opposed to the "animal" and also of distinguishing human beliefs and behaviors that can be characterized as being animal from those that are "truly human." Some discourses also employ the concept of savagery as a bridge between the human and the animal, where the form of humanity but not its ideal beliefs and practices can be (...)
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  19.  7
    Clare Palmer (2014). Contested Frameworks in Environmental Ethics. In Ricardo Rozzi, Steward Pickett, Clare Palmer, Juan Armesto & J. Baird Callicott (eds.), Linking Ecology and Ethics for a Changing World: Values, Philosophy and Action. Springer 191-206.
    This paper provides an overview of some key, and contrasting, ideas in environmental ethics for those unfamiliar with the field. It outlines the ways in which environmental ethicists have defended different positions concerning what matters ethically, from those that focus on human beings (including issues of environmental justice and justice between generations) to those who argue that non-human animals, living organisms, ecosystems and species have some kind of moral status. The paper also considers different theoretical approaches to environmental ethics in (...)
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  20.  28
    Clare Palmer (2003). Placing Animals in Urban Environmental Ethics. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):64–78.
  21. Peter Sandoe, Sandra Cprr & Clare Palmer (2014). Fat Companions: Understanding Canine and Feline Obesity and its Effects on Welfare. In Michael Appleby, Dan Weary & Peter Sandoe (eds.), Dilemmas in Animal Welfare. CABI International 28-45.
     
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  22.  5
    Clare Palmer (2014). Value Conflicts in Feral Cat Management: Trap-Neuter-Return or Trap-Euthanize. In Michael Appleby, Dan Weary & Peter Sandoe (eds.), Dilemmas in Animal Welfare. CABI International 148-168.
    This chapter explores the key values at stake in feral cat management, focusing on the debate over whether to use trap-neuter-return or trap-euthanize as management tools for cat populations. The chapter provides empirical background on unowned cats, sketches widely used arguments in favour of reducing cat populations and considers how these arguments relate to important and widely held values including the value of lives, subjective experiences and species. The chapter promotes critical understanding of the diverse value positions that may be (...)
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  23.  9
    Clare Palmer (2015). Response to “Vulnerability, Dependence, and Special Obligations to Domesticated Animals” by Elijah Weber. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (4):695-703.
    This paper responds to Elijah Weber’s “Vulnerability, Dependence, and Special Obligations to Domesticated Animals: A Reply to Palmer”. Weber’s paper develops significant objections to the account of special obligations I developed in my book Animal Ethics in Context, in particular concerning our obligations to companion animals. In this book, I made wide-ranging claims about how we may acquire special obligations to animals, including being a beneficiary of an institution that creates vulnerable and dependent animals, and sharing in attitudes that contribute (...)
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  24.  10
    Clare Palmer (2004). Response to Cobb and Menta. Process Studies 33 (1):46-70.
  25.  6
    Clare Palmer (2011). Does Nature Matter? The Place of the Non-Human in the Ethics of Climate Change. In Denis Arnold (ed.), The Ethics of Global Climate Change. Cambridge University Press 272-291.
  26.  18
    Clare Palmer (1998). Environmental Ethics and Process Thinking. Clarendon Press.
    In this study, Clare Palmer challenges the belief that the process thinking of writers like A.N. Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne has offered an unambiguously positive contribution to environmental ethics. She compares process ethics to a variety of other forms of environmental ethics, as well as deep ecology, and reveals a number of difficulties associated with process thinking about the environment.
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  27.  34
    Robert Frodeman, Dale Jamieson, J. Baird Callicott, Stephen M. Gardiner, Lori Gruen, Irene J. Klaver, Eugene Hargrove, Ben A. Minteer, Bryan Norton, Clare Palmer, Holmes Rolston, Ricardo Rozzi, James P. Sterba, William M. Throop & Victoria Davion (2007). Commentary on the Future of Environmental Philosophy. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):117 - 150.
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  28. Clare Palmer (1995). Larry May and Shari Collins Sharratt, Eds., Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (1):58-60.
     
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  29.  15
    Clare Palmer (1997). The Idea of the Domesticated Animal Contract. Environmental Values 6 (4):411 - 425.
    Some recent works have suggested that the relationship between human beings and domesticated animals might be described as contractual. This paper explores how the idea of such an animal contract might relate to key characteristics of social contract theory, in particular to issues of the change in state from 'nature' to 'culture'; to free consent and irrevocability; and to the benefits and losses to animals which might follow from such a contract. The paper concludes that there are important dissimilarities between (...)
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  30.  3
    Clare Palmer (1997). Dolly: A New Form of Transgenic Breedwealth. Environmental Values 6 (4):427-437.
    Public debate in Britain surrounding the cloning of Dolly the sheep has primarily focused on the legitimacy of cloning humans, not sheep. This bracketing of the human question relies on a distinction between humans and animals belied by the very constitution of transgenic animals who are made with human DNA, such as Polly. Moreover, the ways in which human beings think about, manipulate and classify animals have distinct cultural consequences, for example in relation to cultural understandings of life, property, kinship (...)
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  31.  10
    Clare Palmer (2014). Three Questions on Climate Change. Ethics and International Affairs 28 (3):343-350.
    Climate change will have highly significant and largely negative effects on human societies into the foreseeable future, effects that are already generating ethical and policy dilemmas of unprecedented scope, scale, and complexity. One important group of ethical and policy issues raised here concerns what I call environmental values. By this I do not mean the impact that climate change will have on the environment as a valuable human resource, nor am I referring to the changing climate as a threat to (...)
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  32.  4
    Clare Palmer & Brendon M. H. Larson (2014). Should We Move the Whitebark Pine? Assisted Migration, Ethics and Global Environmental Change. Environmental Values 23 (6):641-662.
    Some species face extinction if they are unable to keep pace with climate change. Yet proposals to assist threatened species’ poleward or uphill migration (‘assisted migration’) have caused significant controversy among conservationists, not least because assisted migration seems to threaten some values, even as it protects others. To date, however, analysis of ethical and value questions about assisted migration has largely remained abstract, removed from the ultimately pragmatic decision about whether or not to move a particular species. This paper uses (...)
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  33.  28
    Clare Palmer (2004). 'Respect for Nature' in the Earth Charter: The Value of Species and the Value of Individuals. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (1 & 2):97 – 107.
    This paper explores the idea of 'respect for nature' in the Earth Charter. It maintains that the Earth Charter proposes a broadly holistic environmental ethic where, in situations of conflict, species are given ethical priority over the lives of individual sentient organisms. The paper considers policy implications of this perspective, looking by means of example at the current European environmental policy dispute about the ruddy and white-headed duck. Questions about the value of species and biological diversity this raises are explored. (...)
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  34.  3
    Clare Palmer & Peter Sandoe (2011). Animal Ethics. In Michael Appleby, Barry Hughes, Joy Mench & Anna Ollson (eds.), Animal Welfare. CABI International 1-12.
    This chapter introduces ans discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why we should engage in reasoning about animal ethics, rather than relying on intuitions or feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about the nature of our duties to animals. These are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, animal rights views, contextual views and what we call a "respect for nature" view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possible to combine elements from the (...)
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  35.  7
    Clare Palmer (2002). Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Ecophilosophy. Environmental Ethics 24 (1):103-104.
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  36.  13
    Clare A. Palmer (2003). Animals, Colonisation and Urbanisation. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):47-58.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power (...)
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  37.  17
    Clare Palmer (2003). Colonization, Urbanization, and Animals. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):47 – 58.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power (...)
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  38.  2
    Clare Palmer (1992). Stewardship. In Ian Ball, Margaret Goodall, Clare Palmer & John Reader (eds.), The Earth Beneath. SPCK 67-87.
  39.  2
    Clare Palmer (2015). Review of Avram Hiller, Ramona Ilea and Leonard Kahn , Consequentialism and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 24 (2):259-261.
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  40.  15
    Clare Palmer (2007). The Future of Graduate Education in Environmental Philosophy/Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 12 (2):136-139.
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  41.  5
    Brendon M. H. Larson & Clare Palmer (2013). Assisted Colonization is No Panacea, but Let's Not Discount It Either. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):16-18.
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  42.  8
    Clare A. Palmer (2002). Quantum Physics, 'Postmodern Scientific Worldview' and Callicott's Environmental Ethics. In Wayne Ouderkirk & J. Hill (eds.), Land, Value, Community: Callicott and Environmental Philosophy. SUNY Press 171-184.
  43.  4
    Clare A. Palmer (2002). Christianity, Englishness and the Southern English Countryside: A Study of the Work of H.J. Massingham. Social and Cultural Geography 3 (1):25-38.
    This paper explores the relationships between Christianity, Englishness, and ideas about the southern English landscape in the writings of the 1930s and 1940s rural commentator, H.J. Massingham. The paper begins by looking in general terms at the conjunction of religious and national identities in the context of national landscapes before moving on to consider in more detail one particular instance of this in the writing of H.J. Massingham. Massingham's understanding of a divine natural order, his construction of a kind of (...)
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  44.  1
    Christian Gambourg, Clare Palmer & Peter Sandoe (2012). Ethics of WIldife Management and Conservation: What Should We Try To Protect? Nature Education Knowledge 3 (7):8.
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  45.  1
    Clare Palmer (2006). Rethinking Animal Ethics in Appropriate Context: How Rolston's Work Can Help. In Christopher Preston & Wayne Ouderkirk (eds.), Nature, Value Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III. Springer 183-200.
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  46.  1
    Clare Palmer (2012). Inconvenient Desires: Should We Routinely Neuter Companion Animals? Anthrozoos 25 (1):153-172.
    Influential parts of the veterinary profession, and notably the American Veterinary Medicine Association, are promoting the routine neutering of cats and dogs that will not be used for breeding purposes. However, this view is not universally held, even among representatives of the veterinary profession. In particular, some veterinary associations in Europe defend the view that when reproduction is not an issue, then neutering, particularly of dogs, should be decided on a case-by-case basis. However, even in Europe the American view is (...)
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  47.  1
    Clare Palmer & Emily Brady (2007). Landscape and Value in the Work of Alfred Wainwright. Landscape Research 32 (4):397-421.
    Alfred Wainwright was arguably the best known British guidebook writer of the20th century, and his work has been highly influential in promoting and directing fell-walking in northern Britain, in particular in the English Lake District. His work has, however, received little critical attention. This paper represents an initial attempt to undertake such a study. We examine Wainwright’s work through the lens of the landscape values and aesthetics that, we suggest,underpins it, and by an exploration of what might be called Wainwright’s (...)
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  48.  2
    Clare A. Palmer (2003). Animals, Colonisation and Urbanisation. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):47-58.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power (...)
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  49.  4
    Clare Palmer (2009). Review of Paola Cavalieri (Ed.), The Death of the Animal: A Dialogue. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (7).
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  50.  1
    Clare A. Palmer, Plagiarism and the Academic Essay.
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