Search results for 'Good and evil' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. I. J. Good (1982). A Good Explanation of an Event is Not Necessarily Corroborated by the Event. Philosophy of Science 49 (2):251-253.score: 150.0
    It is shown by means of a simple example that a good explanation of an event is not necessarily corroborated by the occurrence of that event. It is also shown that this contention follows symbolically if an explanation having higher "explicativity" than another is regarded as better.
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  2. Irving J. Good (1983). Good Thinking: The Foundations of Probability and its Applications. Univ Minnesota Pr.score: 150.0
    ... Press for their editorial perspicacity, to the National Institutes of Health for the partial financial support they gave me while I was writing some of the chapters, and to Donald Michie for suggesting the title Good Thinking.
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  3. I. J. Good (1962). Errata and Corrigenda for Good and Good. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (49):88.score: 120.0
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  4. Alan Norrie (forthcoming). Ethics and History: Can Critical Lawyers Talk of Good and Evil? [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-14.score: 78.0
    This essay explores what we might mean by good and evil, and argues that these terms remain salient for a critical, socio-historical, understanding of criminal law. It draws upon a meta-ethics of freedom and solidarity to explain what good means in recent mercy killing cases in England and Wales, and what evil means in Arendt’s phrase, the ‘banality of evil’.
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  5. Steven J. Jensen (2010). Good and Evil Actions: A Journey Through Saint Thomas Aquinas. Catholic University of America Press.score: 72.0
    *Tackles the Thomistic debate surrounding the inherent good and evil of human actions*.
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  6. Raimond Gaita (1991). Good and Evil: An Absolute Conception. St. Martin's Press.score: 72.0
    Raimond Gaita's Good and Evil is one of the most important, original and provocative books on the nature of morality to have been published in recent years. It is essential reading for anyone interested in what it means to talk about good and evil. Gaita argues that questions about morality are inseparable from the preciousness of each human being, an issue we can only address if we place the idea of remorse at the centre of moral (...)
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  7. Russ Shafer-Landau (2004). Whatever Happened to Good and Evil? Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Since September 11, 2001, many people in the United States have been more inclined to use the language of good and evil, and to be more comfortable with the idea that certain moral standards are objective (true independently of what anyone happens to think of them). Some people, especially those who are not religious, are not sure how to substantiate this view. Whatever Happened to Good and Evil? provides a basis for exploring these doubts and ultimately (...)
     
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  8. Samuel P. Oliner (2011). The Nature of Good and Evil: Understanding the Many Acts of Moral and Immoral Behavior. Paragon House.score: 72.0
    Follow the leader: why people go against their better judgment? -- How could they do that?: understanding the many sources and faces of evil -- Silently standing by: why we do or don't come to the aid of those who need us -- Paving the way to resistance: the gift of good during the Nazi occupation 1939-1945 -- Preconditions of resistance during the Armenian and Rwandan genocides -- Nature of goodness -- The world of heroes: why we need (...)
     
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  9. George Rogers Swann (1929/1978). Philosophical Parallelisms in Six English Novelists: The Conception of Good, Evil, and Human Nature. R. West.score: 69.0
     
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  10. Erich Fromm (1964/2010). The Heart of Man, its Genius for Good and Evil. New York, Harper & Row.score: 60.0
    Man : wolf or sheep? -- Different forms of violence -- Love of death and love of life -- Individual and social narcissism -- Incestuous ties -- Freedom, determinism, alternativism.
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  11. Erich Fromm (2010). The Pathology of Normalcy: Its Genius for Good and Evil. American Mental Health Foundation Books.score: 60.0
    Modern man's pathology of normalcy -- The concept of mental health -- Humanistic science of man -- Is man lazy by nature?.
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  12. Bruce R. Reichenbach (1982). Evil and a Good God. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    ". . . a comprehensive review and criticism of the major deductive and inductive arguments against theism [and] a morally sufficient reason for the presence of ...
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  13. Josiah Royce (1964). Studies of Good and Evil. Hamden, Conn.,Archon Books.score: 60.0
    The title of this book is in its nature wide. It commits the essays contained in this volume merely to one common character.
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  14. Tomáš Sedláček (2011). Economics of Good and Evil: The Quest for Economic Meaning From Gilgamesh to Wall Street. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Argues that economics is a cultural phenomenon, rather than a strictly mathematical entity, that is found in mythology, religion, philosophy, psychology, ...
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  15. Martin Buber (1953). Good and Evil, Two Interpretations: I. Right and Wrong. New York, Scribner.score: 60.0
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  16. Martin Buber (1952). Images of Good and Evil. London, Routledge & Paul.score: 60.0
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  17. A. A. M. Kinneging (2009). A Geography of Good and Evil: Philosophical Investigations. Isi Books.score: 60.0
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  18. Hans Küng (2009). How to Do Good & Avoid Evil: A Global Ethic From the Sources of Judaism. Skylight Paths Pub..score: 60.0
    Explore how the principles of a global ethic can be found in Judaism and how they can provide the ethical norms for all religions to work together toward a more ...
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  19. Philip Blair Rice (1975). On the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Greenwood Press.score: 60.0
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  20. Abigail L. Rosenthal (1987). A Good Look at Evil. Temple University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  21. Shalom Rosenberg (1989). Good and Evil in Jewish Thought. Mod Books.score: 60.0
     
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  22. Herbert Louis Samuel Samuel (1933). The Tree of Good and Evil. London, P. Davies.score: 60.0
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  23. Cohen Stuart & H. G. (1984). The Struggle in Man Between Good and Evil: An Inquiry Into the Origin of the Rabbinic Concept of Yeṣer Haraʼ. J.H. Kok.score: 60.0
     
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  24. Richard Taylor (2000). Good and Evil. Prometheus Books.score: 60.0
     
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  25. Richard Taylor (1970/1984). Good and Evil: A New Direction: A Forceful Attack on the Rationalistic Tradition in Ethics. Prometheus Books.score: 60.0
     
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  26. Richard Taylor (1970). Good and Evil: A New Direction. [New York]Macmillan.score: 60.0
     
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  27. Steven M. Duncan, Pain and Evil.score: 51.0
    In this paper I defend the thesis that, considered simply as certain sorts of bodily sensations, pleasure is not the good nor is pain intrinsically evil. In fact, the opposite is largely the case: pursuit of pleasure is generally productive of ontic evil, and pain, when heeded, directs us toward the ontic good.
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  28. Andrew Gleeson (2012). A a Frightening Love: Recasting the Problem of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 51.0
    The greater good -- The intellectual and the existential -- The problem of evil and the problem of the slightest toothache -- The God of love -- Is God an agent? -- The real God.
     
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  29. Kenneth Einar Himma (2010). Plantinga's Version of the Free-Will Argument: The Good and Evil That Free Beings Do. Religious Studies 46 (1):21-39.score: 48.0
    According to Plantinga's version of the free-will argument (FWA), the existence of free beings in the world who, on the whole, do more good than evil is the greater moral good that cannot be secured by even an omnipotent God without allowing some evil and thereby shows the logical compatibility of God with evil. In this essay, I argue that there are good empirical and moral reasons, from the standpoint of one plausible conception of (...)
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  30. Friedrich Nietzsche (1886/1989). Beyond Good and Evil. Vintage.score: 48.0
    “Supposing that truth is a women-what then?” This is the very first sentence in Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil . Not very often are philosophers so disarmingly explicit in their intention to discomfort the reader. In fact, one might say that the natural state of Nietzsche’s reader is one of perplexity. Yet it is in the process of overcoming the perplexity that one realizes how rewarding to have one’s ideas challenged. In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche (...)
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  31. Christopher Miles Coope (2001). Good-Bye to the Problem of Evil, Hello to the Problem of Veracity. Religious Studies 37 (4):373-396.score: 48.0
    I start from Mill's words about Mansel and the problem of evil. In this dispute Mansel has generally been thought to have come off worst. However, Mansel was clearly right to this extent: that what would make a man a good man would not be the same as what made God good. This is because, quite generally, what makes something good of its kind, where we can talk about goodness at all, varies with the kind. With (...)
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  32. Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Review of Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick, The Soul of Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil. [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies.score: 48.0
    This is a contribution to a symposium on Clark and Dudrick’s The Soul of Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil. I focus on three aspects of their book. First, I critique Clark and Dudrick’s claim that Nietzsche recognizes a discrete “will to value.” Second, I argue that Clark and Dudrick’s reading of Nietzschean drives (Triebe) as homunculi is indefensible. Third, I raise questions about their claim that Nietzsche understands the self as a “normative ordering” of drives, which they distinguish (...)
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  33. Jason P. Roberts (2011). Emerging in the Image of God to Know Good and Evil. Zygon 46 (2):471-481.score: 48.0
    Abstract. Found in the Primeval History in Genesis, the biblical concepts of the “image of God” and the “knowledge of good and evil” remain integral to Christian anthropology, especially with regard to the theologoumena of “fall” and “original sin.” All of these symbols are remained important and appropriate descriptors of the human condition, provided that contemporary academic theological anthropology engages in constructive dialogue with the natural and social sciences. Using Paul Ricoeur's notion of “second naïveté experience,” I illustrate (...)
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  34. Peter Singer, Introduction Excerpted From the President of Good and Evil , New York, 2004.score: 48.0
    George W. Bush is not only America’s president, but also its most prominent moralist. No other president in living memory has spoken so often about good and evil, right and wrong. His inaugural address was a call to build “a single nation of justice and opportunity.” A year later, he famously proclaimed North Korea, Iran and Iraq to be an “axis of evil,” and in contrast, he called the United States “a moral nation.” He defends his tax (...)
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  35. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1990/2003). Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future. Penguin Books.score: 48.0
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, (...)
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  36. Peter Singer, The President of Good and Evil Reviewed by Federico Stafforini May 2, 2004.score: 48.0
    George W. Bush is not only America’s president, but also its most prominent moralist. No other president in living memory has spoken so often about good and evil, right and wrong. […] But in what moral truths does the president believe? Considering how much the president says about ethics, it is surprising how little serious discussion there has been of the moral philosophy of George W. Bush.
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  37. Tommy Jensen (2010). Beyond Good and Evil: The Adiaphoric Company. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):425 - 434.score: 48.0
    In this article, six demoralising processes in the context of the company are identified. These processes promote a realm of ' being-with', in which outcomes of human interaction are evaluated on rational grounds, and on whether or not a particular action accorded with stipulated ethical rules. Thereby the realm of 'being-for', in which individuals are supported to take increased responsibility, is marginalized. The conclusion made is that not only do the demoralizing processes systematically produce moral distance between humans, which weakens (...)
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  38. Keith Ansell-Pearson & Christa Davis Acampora, Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil: A Reader's Guide.score: 48.0
    This book presents a student-friendly introduction to one of Nietzsche's most widely-read and studied texts. "Beyond Good and Evil" contains Nietzsche's mature philosophy of the free spirit. Although it is one of his most widely read texts, it is a notoriously difficult piece of philosophical writing. The authors demonstrate in clear and precise terms why it is to be regarded as Nietzsche's philosophical masterpiece and the work of a revolutionary genius. This "Reader's Guide" is the ideal companion to (...)
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  39. Catherine Jack Deavel (2007). Relational Evil, Relational Good: Thomas Aquinas and Process Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (3):297-313.score: 48.0
    I first demonstrate that certain process philosophers and Aquinas hold extremely similar notions of evil. Whitehead and Hartshorne parallel Aquinas in understanding evil as relational, as a conflict of goods, and as a necessary element in a larger good. On this last point, process philosophers contend that traditional theists must either reject the claim of God’s omnipotence or admit that an omnipotent God would be responsible for evil, including moral evil. I respond that Aquinas’s distinction (...)
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  40. Alan Norrie (2012). The Scene and the Crime: Can Critical Realists Talk About Good and Evil? Journal of Critical Realism 11 (1):76-93.score: 48.0
    This essay argues that critical realism provides a philosophical perspective from which to talk about good and evil. It draws on dialectical critical realism’s meta-ethics of freedom and solidarity, and the different grades of freedom identified there: from the basic spontaneity in agency to the possibility of a fully flourishing, eudaimonic social condition. It argues that evil acts can be understood as those which fundamentally deny basic human freedom (spontaneity) and solidarity, and that good acts are (...)
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  41. Steve Fuller (2013). 'Never Let a Good Crisis Go to Waste': Moral Entrepreneurship, or the Fine Art of Recycling Evil Into Good. Business Ethics 22 (1):118-129.score: 48.0
    Moral entrepreneurship is the fine art of recycling evil into good by taking advantage of situations given or constructed as crises. It should be seen as the ultimate generalisation of the entrepreneurial spirit, whose peculiar excesses have always sat uneasily with homo oeconomicus as the constrained utility maximiser, an image that itself has come to be universalised. A task of this essay is to reconcile the two images in terms of what by the end I call ‘superutilitarianism’, which (...)
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  42. Maudemarie Clark (2012). The Soul of Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    This book presents a provocative new interpretation of what is arguably Nietzsche's most important and most difficult work, Beyond Good and Evil.
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  43. Peter Singer, The President of Good and Evil Reviewed by Dennis Altman The Age, May 1, 2004.score: 48.0
    Since their Puritan origins in the 17th century, American politicians have tended to speak in the language of divinely given morality. George W. Bush is not unique in his frequent references to the language of good and evil, just as he is not the first US politician to mangle the language.
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  44. John Bousfield (1985). Good, Evil and Spiritual Power: Reflections on Sufi Teachings. In David J. Parkin (ed.), The Anthropology of Evil. B. Blackwell. 194--208.score: 48.0
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  45. Jan Denise (2008). Innately Good: Dispelling the Myth That You're Not. Health Communications, Inc..score: 48.0
    Introduction -- Part I: The lie that we are not good enough as we are -- Where the lie came from and why we bought it -- Trying to meet the criteria for good enough -- Perpetuating the striving and the lack -- Part II: Dead ends and what they teach us -- Money/stuff -- Appearance -- Religion -- Food -- Drugs/alcohol -- Sex/romantic love -- Accomplishment/education/notoriety -- Busyness -- Part III: The truth : we are innately (...) -- Evil is an alternative, not our nature -- Lighting our darkness to let go of fear, false beliefs, and all negative -- Emotion -- Looking at our essence, which is love, or everything good -- Being who we are ... it means overcoming our separateness -- Invoking love -- Aligning with love -- Being love innately more than we ever dreamed of being. (shrink)
     
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  46. Roy Jackson (2004). An Approach to Reading Beyond Good and Evil. Think 2 (6):41-50.score: 48.0
    Roy Jackson's introduction to Neitzsche's Beyond Good and Evil will prove invaluable to those reading Neitzsche for the first time.
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  47. Chad V. Meister (2012). Evil: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.score: 48.0
    What is evil? -- Problems of evil -- Theodicy -- Divine hiddenness -- Evil, atheism and the problem of good -- Evil and suffering in Hinduism and Buddhism -- Eternal goods and the triumph over evil.
     
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  48. Michael Shermer (2004). The Science of Good and Evil: Why People Cheat, Gossip, Care, Share, and Follow the Golden Rule. Times Books.score: 48.0
    In his third and final investigation into the science of belief, bestselling author Michael Shermer tackles the evolution of morality and ethics A century and a half after Darwin first proposed an “evolutionary ethics,” science has begun to tackle the roots of morality. Just as evolutionary biologists study why we are hungry (to motivate us to eat) or why sex is enjoyable (to motivate us to procreate), they are now searching for the roots of human nature. In The Science of (...)
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  49. Lars Fr H. Svendsen (2010). A Philosophy of Evil. Dalkey Archive Press.score: 45.0
    Introduction: What is evil and how can we understand it? -- The theology of evil -- Theodicies -- The privation theodicy -- The free will theodicy -- The Iraenean theodicy -- The totality theodicy -- History as secular theodicy -- Job's insight-the theodicy of the hereafter -- Anthropology of evil -- Are people good or evil? -- The typologies of evil -- Demonic evil -- Evil for evil's sake -- Evil's (...)
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  50. Adam Morton (2004). On Evil. Routledge.score: 45.0
    Evil has long fascinated psychologists, philosophers, novelists and playwrights but remains an incredibly difficult concept to talk about. On Evil is a compelling and at times disturbing tour of the many faces of evil. What is evil, and what makes people do awful things? If we can explain evil, do we explain it away? Can we imagine the mind of a serial killer, or does such evil defy description? Does evil depend on a (...)
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