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  1. John Leslie (1989). Universes. Routledge.
    One of the first books to address what has come to be known as the philosophy of cosmology, Universes asks, "Why does the universe exist?", arguing that the universe is "fine tuned for producing life." For example, if the universe's early expansion speed had been smaller by one part in a million, then it would have recollapsed rapidly; with an equivalently tiny speed increase, no galaxies would have formed. Either way, this universe would have been lifeless.
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  2. John Leslie (1992). Design and the Anthropic Principle. Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):349-354.
  3.  22
    John Leslie (forthcoming). Cosmology and Theology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  4. John Leslie (1990). Is the End of the World Nigh? Philosophical Quarterly 40 (158):65-72.
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  5.  3
    John Leslie (1996). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. Routledge.
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. The End of the World is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. One (...)
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  6. John Leslie (1992). Time and the Anthropic Principle. Mind 101 (403):521-540.
    Carter’s anthropic principle reminds us that intelligent life can find itself only in life-permitting times, places or universes. The principle concerns a possible observational selection effect, not a designing deity. It has no special concern with humans, nor does it say that intelligent life is inevitable and common. Barrow and Tipler, who discuss all this, are not biologically ignorant. As argued in "Universes" (Leslie, 1989) they may well be right in thinking that "fine tuning" of force strengths and particle masses, (...)
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  7.  12
    John Leslie (1979). Value and Existence. Basil Blackwell.
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  8. John Leslie (1983). Observership in Cosmology: The Anthropic Principle. Mind 92 (368):573-579.
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  9.  25
    John Leslie (2001). Infinite Minds: A Philosophical Cosmology. Oxford University Press.
    The cosmos exists just because of the ethical need for it We, and all the intricate structures of our universe, exist as thoughts in a divine mind that knows everything worth knowing. There could also be infinitely many other universes in this mind....It may be hard to believe that the universe is as Leslie says it is--but it is also hard to resist his compelling ideas and arguments.
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  10.  52
    John Leslie (2005). Review: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (453):197-200.
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  11.  93
    John Leslie (1982). Anthropic Principle, World Ensemble, Design. American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (2):141 - 151.
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  12.  50
    John Leslie (1993). Doom and Probabilities. Mind 102 (407):489-491.
  13. Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams (2004). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
     
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  14.  76
    John Leslie (1986). Anthropic Explanations in Cosmology. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:87 - 95.
    Cosmologists using the Anthropic Principle claim that if our universe had been much different then nobody would exist to observe it. This may become explanatory when one accepts the actual existence of multiple "universes": gigantic, largely or entirely separate systems having very varied properties. Ian Hacking has urged, though, that an Inverse Gambler's Fallacy is committed during many attempts to formulate anthropic explanations. Besides disagreeing with him, the paper makes several further points in support of such explanations, in particular against (...)
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  15.  32
    John Leslie (1988). No Inverse Gambler's Fallacy in Cosmology. Mind 97 (386):269-272.
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  16.  80
    John Leslie (1994). Anthropic Prediction. Philosophia 23 (1-4):117-144.
  17.  20
    John Leslie (1997). Observer-Relative Chances and the Doomsday Argument. Inquiry 40 (4):427 – 436.
    Suppose various observers are divided randomly into two groups, a large and a small. Not knowing into which group anyone has been sent, each can have strong grounds for believing in being in the large group, although recognizing that every observer in the other group has equally powerful reasons for thinking of this other group as the large one. Justified belief can therefore be observer-relative in a rather paradoxical way. Appreciating this allows one to reject an intriguing new objection against (...)
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  18.  75
    John Leslie (2007). Immortality Defended. Blackwell Pub..
    Might we be parts of a divine mind? Could anything like an afterlife make sense? Starting with a Platonic answer to why the world exists, _Immortality Defended_ suggests we could well be immortal in all of three separate ways. Tackles the fundamental questions posed by our very existence, among them, "why does the cosmos exist?", "is there a divine mind or God?", and "in what sense might we have afterlives?" Defends a belief in immortality, without the need for a (...)
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  19.  60
    John Leslie (2010). The Risk That Humans Will Soon Be Extinct. Philosophy 85 (4):447-463.
    If it survives for a little longer, the human race will probably start to spread across its galaxy. Germ warfare, though, or environmental collapse or many another factor might shortly drive humans to extinction. Are they likely to avoid it? Well, suppose they spread across the galaxy. Of all humans who would ever have been born, maybe only one in a hundred thousand would have lived as early as you. If, in contrast, humans soon became extinct then because of the (...)
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  20.  71
    John Leslie (1994). Fine Tuning Can Be Important. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (3):383.
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  21.  29
    John Leslie (1991). Ensuring Two Bird Deaths with One Throw. Mind 100 (1):73-86.
  22.  13
    John Leslie (1994). Przejawy delikatnego dostrojenia. Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 16.
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  23.  34
    John Leslie (2000). Our Place in the Cosmos. Philosophy 75 (1):5-24.
    Our world seems fine tuned in life-permitting ways. If the cosmos contains many universes, only the appropriately tuned ones can be seen by living beings. An alternative is that God acted as Fine Tuner. We might account for God in terms of an eternally powerful ethical requirement that God exists, rejecting J. L. Mackie's judgment that absolute ethical requirements are incredibly queer. Mackie viewed such requirements as logically possible, so if they were absent then this would seem a matter of (...)
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  24.  22
    John Leslie (1992). Doomsday Revisited. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (166):85-89.
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  25.  61
    John Leslie (2008). Infinitely Long Afterlives and the Doomsday Argument. Philosophy 83 (4):519-524.
    A recent book of mine defends three distinct varieties of immortality. One of them is an infinitely lengthy afterlife; however, any hopes of it might seem destroyed by something like Brandon Carter's 'doomsday argument' against viewing ourselves as extremely early humans. The apparent difficulty might be overcome in two ways. First, if the world is non-deterministic then anything on the lines of the doomsday argument may prove unable to deliver a strongly pessimistic conclusion. Secondly, anything on those lines may break (...)
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  26.  10
    John Leslie (1994). Testing the Doomsday Argument. Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (1):31-44.
  27. John Leslie (2002). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. Routledge.
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. _The End of the World_ is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. One (...)
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  28.  39
    John Leslie (1990). The Reality of the Future. Dialogue 29 (03):441-.
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  29.  8
    John Leslie (2011). Axiogenesis: An Essay in Metaphysical Optimalism. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):441-443.
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  30. John Leslie (1986). Current Issues in Teleology. Univ Pr of America.
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  31.  15
    John Leslie (1978). Efforts to Explain All Existence. Mind 87 (346):181-194.
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  32.  34
    John Leslie (2009). A Cosmos Existing Through Ethical Necessity. Philo 12 (2):172-187.
    The paper develops a Platonic and Spinozistic metaphysics. With an unprovable yet absolute necessity, the cosmos exists just because of the ethical need for it. We, and all the intricate structures of our universe, exist as intricately structured thoughts in a divine mind. This mind could contain infinitely many other universes as well, and minds of the same kind could exist in infinite number. Evidence for this is supplied by the finely tuned orderliness of our universe, and by the sheer (...)
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  33.  22
    John Leslie (1980). The World's Necessary Existence. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (4):207 - 224.
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  34.  13
    John Leslie (1989). The Need to Generate Happy People. Philosophia 19 (1):29-33.
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  35.  18
    John Leslie (1970). The Theory That the World Exists Because It Should. American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (4):286 - 298.
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  36.  28
    John Leslie (1997). A Neoplatonist's Pantheism. The Monist 80 (2):218-231.
  37.  9
    John Leslie (1986). Mackie on Neoplatonism's 'Replacement for God'. Religious Studies 22 (3/4):325 - 342.
    David Hume's greatness depends in large part on how his writings hint at beautiful and coherent theories which are recognizably Humean despite their divergences from the untidy originals. Now, perhaps the clearest vision of a contradiction–free Platonic Form of Hume was had by J. L. Mackie; he described it in such masterpieces as The Cement of the Universe, Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong, and The Miracle of Theism. How successful is this last in its attack on theism? I shall discuss (...)
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  38.  25
    John Leslie (1972). Ethically Required Existence. American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (3):215 - 224.
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  39. John Leslie (1997). Physics, Philosophy, and Theology: A Common Quest for Understanding. Vatican Observatory Pub.
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  40.  15
    John Leslie (2012). Axiogenesis. Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):441-443.
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  41.  33
    John Leslie (1983). Why Not Let Life Become Extinct? Philosophy 58 (225):329 - 338.
    Would Earth be sadly underpopulated if all life on it had died? I shall argue for a Yes, against two main groups. In the first are those who say that life's absence could not be sad, a pity, something less than ideal, because there would be nobody to be sad about it. The second group maintains that life's absence would be preferable to its presence since living can be nasty.
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  42.  13
    John Leslie (1996). A Difficulty for Everett's Many-Worlds Theory. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 10 (3):239 – 246.
    Abstract An argument originated by Brandon Carter presents humankind's imminent extinction as likelier than we should otherwise have judged. We ought to be reluctant to think ourselves among the earliest 0.01 %, for instance, of all humans who will ever have lived; yet we should be in that tiny group if the human race survived long, even at just its present size. While such reasoning attracts many criticisms, perhaps the only grave one is that indeterminism means there is not yet (...)
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  43.  30
    John Leslie (1985). Book Review:The Riddle of Existence: An Essay in Idealistic Metaphysics Nicholas Rescher. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 52 (3):485-.
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  44.  9
    John Leslie (1973). Does Causal Regularity Defy Chance? Idealistic Studies 3 (3):277-284.
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  45. John Leslie (1990). Physical Cosmology and Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  46. John Leslie (2000). The End of the World. Mind 109 (433):155-158.
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  47.  7
    John Leslie (1989). Demons, Vats and the Cosmos. Philosophical Papers 18 (2):169-188.
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  48.  8
    John Leslie (1976). The Value of Time. American Philosophical Quarterly 13 (2):109 - 121.
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  49.  4
    John Leslie (1971). Morality in a World Guaranteed Best Possible. Studia Leibnitiana 3 (3):199 - 205.
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  50.  2
    Brian Ellis, Hugh Lehman, Nicholas Rescher & John Leslie (1977). Apq Library of Philosophy. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 6 (2).
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