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  1. Yuri Balashov (1994). Uniformitarianism in Cosmology: Background and Philosophical Implications of the Steady-State Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (6):933-958.
    Philosophical considerations have been essentially involved in the origin and development of the steady-state cosmological theory (SST). These considerations include an explicit uniformitarian methodology and implicit metaphysical views concerning the status of natural laws in a changing universe. I shall examine the foundations of SST by reconstructing its early history. Whereas the strong uniformitarian methodology of SST found no support in the subsequent development of cosmology, the idea of a possible influence the global structure of the universe may have on (...)
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  2. Timothy E. Eastman (2007). Cosmic Agnosticism. Process Studies 36 (2):181-197.
    This paper surveys some scientific issues in physical cosmology and concludes that no current model in cosmology adequately meets all key observations. Scholars in process thought are making important contributions in both metaphysics and philosophical cosmology, independent of the outcome of debates in physical cosmology. Such scholars are advised to be very cautious when using hypotheses currently arising from contemporary cosmology.
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  3. Sasan Haghighi (2012). Einstein Legacy: Time Dilation. In Tu Delft University Scientific Association Delft.
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Extraterrestial Life and Intelligence
  1. Guy Kahane (2013). Our Cosmic Insignificance. Noûs 47 (2):745-772.
    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and (...)
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  2. Alan Marshall (1993). Ethics and the Extraterrestrial Environment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (2):227-236.
  3. Lee F. Werth (1998). The Anthropocentric Predicament and the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (the Universe as Seen Through Our Eyes Darkly). Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):83–88.
Why is there Something?
  1. Tyron Goldschmidt (ed.) (2013). The Puzzle of Existence: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing? Routledge.
    This groundbreaking volume investigates the most fundamental question of all: Why is there something rather than nothing? The question is explored from diverse and radical perspectives: religious, naturalistic, platonistic and skeptical. Does science answer the question? Or does theology? Does everything need an explanation? Or can there be brute, inexplicable facts? Could there have been nothing whatsoever? Or is there any being that could not have failed to exist? Is the question meaningful after all? The volume advances cutting-edge debates in (...)
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  2. Shieva Kleinschmidt (forthcoming). Reasoning Without the Principle of Sufficient Reason. In Tyron Goldschmidt (ed.), The Philosophy of Existence: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing? Routledge.
    According to Principles of Sufficient Reason, every truth (in some relevant group) has an explanation. One of the most popular defenses of Principles of Sufficient Reason has been the presupposition of reason defense, which takes endorsement of the defended PSR to play a crucial role in our theory selection. According to recent presentations of this defense, our method of theory selection often depends on the assumption that, if a given proposition is true, then it has an explanation, and this will (...)
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Philosophy of Cosmology, Misc
  1. Massimiliano Badino, The Concept of Infinity in Modern Cosmology.
    The aim of this paper is not only to deal with the concept of infinity, but also to develop some considerations about the epistemological status of cosmology. These problems are connected because from an epistemological point of view, cosmology, meant as the study of the universe as a whole, is not merely a physical (or empirical) science. On the contrary it has an unavoidable metaphysical character which can be found in questions like “why is there this universe (or a universe (...)
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  2. Claus Beisbart (2009). Can We Justifiably Assume the Cosmological Principle in Order to Break Model Underdetermination in Cosmology? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (2):175 - 205.
    If cosmology is to obtain knowledge about the whole universe, it faces an underdetermination problem: Alternative space-time models are compatible with our evidence. The problem can be avoided though, if there are good reasons to adopt the Cosmological Principle (CP), because, assuming the principle, one can confine oneself to the small class of homogeneous and isotropic space-time models. The aim of this paper is to ask whether there are good reasons to adopt the Cosmological Principle in order to avoid underdetermination (...)
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  3. Paul Bishop (ed.) (2012). The Archaic: The Past in the Present: A Collection of Papers. Routledge.
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  4. Paul Bishop (ed.) (2012). The Archaic: The Past in the Present. Routledge.
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  5. Carmen Blacker, Michael Loewe & J. Martin Plumley (eds.) (1975). Ancient Cosmologies. Allen and Unwin.
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  6. James E. Brady (2003). Southern Mexico and Guatemala: In My Hill, in My Valley : The Importance of Place in Ancient Maya Ritual. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man.
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  7. Rémi Brague (2003). The Wisdom of the World: The Human Experience of the Universe in Western Thought. University of Chicago Press.
    When the ancient Greeks looked up into the heavens, they saw not just sun and moon, stars and planets, but a complete, coherent universe, a model of the Good that could serve as a guide to a better life. How this view of the world came to be, and how we lost it (or turned away from it) on the way to becoming modern, make for a fascinating story, told in a highly accessible manner by Remi Brague in this wide-ranging (...)
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  8. Sansonthi Bunyōthayān (2006). Suriyapatithin Phan Pī: Prāsāt Phūphēk, Sakon Nakhō̜n. Samnakphim Naiyanā Praphai.
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  9. Lawrence Cahoone (2009). Arguments From Nothing: God and Quantum Cosmology. Zygon 44 (4):777-796.
    This essay explores a simple argument for a Ground of Being, objections to it, and limitations on it. It is nonsensical to refer to Nothing in the sense of utter absence, hence nothing can be claimed to come from Nothing. If, as it seems, the universe, or any physical ensemble containing it, is past-finite, it must be caused by an uncaused Ground. Speculative many-worlds, pocket universes and multiverses do not affect this argument, but the quantum cosmologies of Alex Vilenkin, and (...)
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  10. Roberto Campos-Navarro (2003). Central and Northern Mexico : Curanderos' Altar-Mesas in Mexico City. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man.
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  11. Allen J. Christenson (2003). Manipulating the Cosmos : Shamanic Tables Among the Highland Maya. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man. 93--104.
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  12. C. J. S. Clarke (1974). Quantum Theory and Cosmolog. Philosophy of Science 41 (4):317-332.
    Interpretations, or generalizations, of quantum theory that are applicable to cosmology are of interest because they must display and resolve the "paradoxes" directly. The Everett interpretation is reexamined and compared with two alternatives. Its "metaphysical" connotations can be removed, after which it is found to be more acceptable than a theory which incorporates collapse, while retaining some unsatisfactory features.
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  13. Dirk L. Couprie (2011). Heaven and Earth in Ancient Greek Cosmology: From Thales to Heraclides Ponticus. Springer.
    Exploring the decisive steps taken by Anaximander of Miletus, this book details the transition from the archaic cosmological world-picture of a flat earth with a celestial vault to the Western world-picture of a free floating earth in an ...
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  14. William Lane Craig (1997). Hartle-Hawking Cosmology and Atheism. Analysis 57 (4):291 - 295.
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  15. William Lane Craig (1993). Theism, Atheism, and Big Bang Cosmology. Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary science presents us with the remarkable theory that the universe began to exist about fifteen billion years ago with a cataclysmic explosion called "the Big Bang." The question of whether Big Bang cosmology supports theism or atheism has long been a matter of discussion among the general public and in popular science books, but has received scant attention from philosophers. This book sets out to fill this gap by means of a sustained debate between two philosophers, William Lane Craig (...)
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  16. Robert J. Deltete (2010). Entropic Creation: Religious Contexts of Thermodynamics and Cosmology. By Helge S. Kragh. Zygon 45 (1):281-282.
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  17. James W. Dow (2003). Sierra Otomí Religious Symbolism : Mankind Responding to the Natural World. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man.
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  18. Willem B. Drees (1991). Quantum Cosmologies and the "Beginning". Zygon 26 (3):373-396.
  19. Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem (1985). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. University of Chicago Press.
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  20. Evelyn Edson (2004). Medieval Views of the Cosmos. Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.
    Once upon a time, the universe was much simpler: before our modern understanding of an infinite formless space scattered with pulsating stars, revolving planets, and mysterious black holes, the universe was seen as a rigid hierarchical system with the earth and the human race at its center. Medieval Views of the Cosmos investigates this worldview shared by medieval societies, revealing how their modes of thought affect us even today. In the medieval world system--inherited by Christians and Muslims from the Greeks (...)
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  21. François Elmir (2005). Science Et Technique : Études d'Histoire Et D'Épistémologie. Siress.
    -- t. 2. Origines médiévales de la science.
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  22. Harvie Ferguson (1990). The Science of Pleasure: Cosmos and Psyche in the Bourgeois World View. Routledge.
    Examines the formation, structure and collapse of the bourgeois world view, exploring the concepts of fun, happiness, pleasure, and excitement.
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  23. David J. Furley (1987). The Greek Cosmologists. Cambridge University Press.
    Furley's study presents a clear picture of the opposing views of the natural world and its contents as seen by philosophers and scientists in classical antiquity. On one side were the materialists whose world was mechanistic, evolutionary, and unbounded, lacking the focus of a natural center. The other side included teleologists, whose world was purposive, non-evolutionary, finite, and centrifocal. This volume takes the reader up to the criticisms of Plato and Aristotle. The second volume will examine Plato and Aristotle's own (...)
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  24. P. P. Gaĭdenko & V. V. Petrov (eds.) (2005). Kosmos I Dusha: Uchenii͡a o Vselennoĭ I Cheloveke V Antichnosti I V Srednie Veka: (Issledovanii͡a I Perevody). Progress-Tradit͡sii͡a.
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  25. Han Geurdes (2010). CHSH and Local Causlaity. Adv Studies Theoretical Physics 4 (20):945.
    Mathematics equivalent to Bell's derivation of the inequalities, also allows a local hidden variables explanation for the correlation between distant measurements.
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  26. Tyron Goldschmidt (ed.) (2013). The Puzzle of Existence: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing? Routledge.
    This groundbreaking volume investigates the most fundamental question of all: Why is there something rather than nothing? The question is explored from diverse and radical perspectives: religious, naturalistic, platonistic and skeptical. Does science answer the question? Or does theology? Does everything need an explanation? Or can there be brute, inexplicable facts? Could there have been nothing whatsoever? Or is there any being that could not have failed to exist? Is the question meaningful after all? The volume advances cutting-edge debates in (...)
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  27. Judith Green (2003). Altars for Ancestors : Maya Altars for the Days of the Dead in Yucatán. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man.
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  28. Petar V. Grujić (2007). Some Epistemic Questions of Cosmology. Foundations of Science 12 (1):39-83.
    We discuss a number of fundamental aspects of modern cosmological concepts, from the phenomenological, observational, theoretical and epistemic points of view. We argue that the modern cosmology, despite a great advent, in particular in the observational sector, is yet to solve important problems, posed already by the classical times. In particular the stress is put on discerning the scientific features of modern cosmological paradigms from the more speculative ones, with the latter immersed in some aspects deeply into mythological world (...)
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  29. A. Grunbaum (2000). A New Critique of Theological Interpretations of Physical Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):1-43.
    This paper is a sequel to my 'Theological Misinterpretations of Current Physical Cosmology' (Foundations of Physics [1996], 26 (4); revised in Philo [1998], 1 (1)). There I argued that the Big Bang models of (classical) general relativity theory, as well as the original 1948 versions of the steady state cosmology, are each logically incompatible with the time-honored theological doctrine that perpetual divine creation ('creatio continuans') is required in each of these two theorized worlds. Furthermore, I challenged the perennial theological doctrine (...)
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  30. Adolf Grünbaum (1991). Creation as a Pseudo-Explanation in Current Physical Cosmology. Erkenntnis 35 (1-3):233 - 254.
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  31. Hans Halvorson (forthcoming). Theism and Physical Cosmology. In Charles Taliaferro, Victoria Harrison & Stewart Goetz (eds.), Routledge Companion to Theism.
    Physical cosmology purports to establish precise and testable claims about the origin of the universe. Thus, cosmology bears directly on traditional metaphysical claims -- in particular, claims about whether the universe has a creator (i.e. God). What is the upshot of cosmology for the claims of theism? Does big-bang cosmology support theism? Do recent developments in quantum and string cosmology undermine theism? We discuss the relations between physical cosmology to theism from both historical and systematic points of view.
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  32. Hans Halvorson, Cosmology and Theology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  33. Hermes (ed.) (2006). Hermes Trismegistus, de Sex Rerum Principiis. Brepols.
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  34. Peter E. Hodgson (1995). Theism, Atheism and Big Bang Cosmology. International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):105-107.
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  35. Rodney D. Holder (2001). The Realization of Infinitely Many Universes in Cosmology. Religious Studies 37 (3):343-350.
    It is shown that, for certain classes of cosmological model which either postulate or give rise to infinitely many universes, only a measure zero subset of the set of possible universes above a given size can in fact be physically realized. It follows that claims to explain the fine tuning of our universe on the basis of such models by appeal to the existence of all possible universes fail.
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  36. Guy Kahane (2013). Our Cosmic Insignificance. Noûs 47 (2):745-772.
    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and (...)
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  37. Matthew G. Looper (2003). Wind, Rain, and Stone : Ancient and Contemporary Maya Meteorology. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man.
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  38. Bruce Love (2003). Shamanic Mesas of Yucatán and Their Historical Roots. In Douglas Sharon & James Edward Brady (eds.), Mesas & Cosmologies in Mesoamerica. San Diego Museum of Man.
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  39. Anita Magowska (ed.) (2009). Makrokosmos Versus Mikrokosmos. Wydawnictwo Kontekst.
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  40. David B. Malament (1995). Is Newtonian Cosmology Really Inconsistent? Philosophy of Science 62 (4):489-510.
    John Norton has recently argued that Newtonian gravitation theory (at least as applied to cosmological contexts where one envisions the possibility of a homogeneous mass distribution throughout all of space) is inconsistent. I am not convinced. Traditional formulations of the theory may seem to break down in cases of the sort Norton considers. But the difficulties they face are only apparent. They are artifacts of the formulations themselves, and disappear if one passes to the so-called "geometrized" formulation of the theory.
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  41. Concetto Martello, Chiara Militello & Andrea Vella (eds.) (2008). Cosmogonie E Cosmologie Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S.I.S.P.M.), Catania, 22-24 Settembre 2006. [REVIEW] Brepols.
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  42. Concetto Martello, Chiara Militello & Andrea Vella (eds.) (2008). Cosmogonie E Cosmologie Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S. Brepols.
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