Search results for 'Physicians' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Marc A. Rodwin (1993). Medicine, Money, and Morals: Physicians' Conflicts of Interest. Oxford University Press.
    Conflicts of interest are rampant in the American medical community. Today it is not uncommon for doctors to refer patients to clinics or labs in which they have a financial interest (40% of physicians in Florida invest in medical centers); for hospitals to offer incentives to physicians who refer patients (a practice that can lead to unnecessary hospitalization); or for drug companies to provide lucrative give-aways to entice doctors to use their "brand name" drugs (which are much more (...)
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  2.  75
    Satish P. Deshpande (2009). A Study of Ethical Decision Making by Physicians and Nurses in Hospitals. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):387 - 397.
    This research investigates the impact of various factors on ethical behavior of 180 not-for-profit hospital employees. Ethical behavior of peers, ethical behavior of successful managers, and emotional intelligence had a significant positive impact on ethical behavior of respondents. Physicians and hospital employees with political connections within the organization were significantly less ethical than other employees. The results have many implications for researchers and healthcare practitioners.
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  3.  7
    Susan L. Norris, Haley K. Holmer, Lauren A. Ogden, Brittany U. Burda & Rongwei Fu (2012). Characteristics of Physicians Receiving Large Payments From Pharmaceutical Companies and the Accuracy of Their Disclosures in Publications: An Observational Study. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):24-.
    Background Financial relationships between physicians and industry are extensive and public reporting of industry payments to physicians is now occurring. Our objectives were to describe physician recipients of large total payments from these seven companies, and to examine discrepancies between these payments and conflict of interest (COI) disclosures in authors’ concurrent publications. Methods The investigative journalism organization, ProPublica, compiled the Dollars for Docs database of payments to individuals from publically available data from seven US pharmaceutical companies during the (...)
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  4.  5
    G. K. Kimsma (2010). Death by Request in The Netherlands: Facts, the Legal Context and Effects on Physicians, Patients and Families. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):355-361.
    In this article I intend to describe an issue of the Dutch euthanasia practice that is not common knowledge. After some general introductory descriptions, by way of formulating a frame of reference, I shall describe the effects of this practice on patients, physicians and families, followed by a more philosophical reflection on the significance of these effects for the assessment of the authenticity of a request and the nature of unbearable suffering, two key concepts in the procedure towards euthanasia (...)
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  5. Lucie White (2010). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians. Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3 (1).
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look at two (...)
     
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  6.  5
    Silviya Aleksandrova (2008). Survey on the Experience in Ethical Decision-Making and Attitude of Pleven University Hospital Physicians Towards Ethics Consultation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):35-42.
    BackgroundContemporary medical practice is complicated by many dilemmas requiring ethical sensitivity and moral reasoning.ObjectiveTo investigate physicians’ experience in ethical decision-making and their attitude towards ethics consultation.MethodsIn a cross-sectional survey 126 physicians representing the main clinics of Pleven University hospital were investigated by a self-administered questionnaire. The following variables were measured: occurrence, nature and ways of resolving ethical problems; physicians’ attitudes towards ethics consultation; physicians’ opinions on qualities and skills of an ethics consultant, and socio-demographic characteristics. Data (...)
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  7.  6
    Samia A. Hurst, Stella Reiter-Theil, Arnaud Perrier, Reidun Forde, Anne-Marie Slowther, Renzo Pegoraro & Marion Danis (2007). Physicians' Access to Ethics Support Services in Four European Countries. Health Care Analysis 15 (4):321-335.
    Clinical ethics support services are developing in Europe. They will be most useful if they are designed to match the ethical concerns of clinicians. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey on random samples of general physicians in Norway, Switzerland, Italy, and the UK, to assess their access to different types of ethics support services, and to describe what makes them more likely to have used available ethics support. Respondents reported access to formal ethics support services such as clinical ethics (...)
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  8.  5
    Martine C. de Vries, Mirjam Houtlosser, Jan M. Wit, Dirk P. Engberts, Dorine Bresters, Gertjan Jl Kaspers & Evert van Leeuwen (2011). Ethical Issues at the Interface of Clinical Care and Research Practice in Pediatric Oncology: A Narrative Review of Parents' and Physicians' Experiences. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):18.
    BackgroundPediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians.MethodologyAn empirical ethical approach, combining a narrative review of qualitative studies on parents' and physicians' experiences of the pediatric oncology (...)
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  9.  31
    Robin R. Radtke (2008). Role Morality in the Accounting Profession – How Do We Compare to Physicians and Attorneys? Journal of Business Ethics 79 (3):279 - 297.
    Role morality can be defined as “claim(ing) a moral permission to harm others in ways that, if not for the role, would be wrong” (A. Applbaum: 1999, Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life (Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ) p. 3). Adversarial situations resulting in role morality occur most frequently in the fields of law, business, and government. Within the realm of accounting, professional obligations may place the accountant in a situation where he/she is susceptible (...)
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  10.  2
    D. C. Malloy, P. Sevigny, T. Hadjistavropoulos, M. Jeyaraj, E. Fahey McCarthy, M. Murakami, S. Paholpak, Y. Lee & I. Park (2009). Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Ethical Guidelines: An International Study of Physicians. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):373-383.
    The intent of ethics is to establish a set of standards that will provide a framework to modify, regulate, and possibly enhance moral behaviour. Eleven focus groups were conducted with physicians from six culturally distinct countries to explore their perception of formalized, written ethical guidelines (i.e., codes of ethics, credos, value and mission statements) that attempt to direct their ethical practice. Six themes emerged from the data: lack of awareness, no impact, marginal impact, other codes or value statements supersede, (...)
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  11.  14
    Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Katherine M. James & Jon C. Tilburt (2013). The Moral Psychology of Rationing Among Physicians: The Role of Harm and Fairness Intuitions in Physician Objections to Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Containment. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):13.
    Physicians vary in their moral judgments about health care costs. Social intuitionism posits that moral judgments arise from gut instincts, called “moral foundations.” The objective of this study was to determine if “harm” and “fairness” intuitions can explain physicians’ judgments about cost-containment in U.S. health care and using cost-effectiveness data in practice, as well as the relative importance of those intuitions compared to “purity”, “authority” and “ingroup” in cost-related judgments.
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  12.  6
    Joris Gielen, Sushma Bhatnagar, Seema Mishra, Arvind K. Chaturvedi, Harmala Gupta, Ambika Rajvanshi, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert (2011). Can Curative or Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Withheld or Withdrawn? The Opinions and Views of Indian Palliative-Care Nurses and Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):5-18.
    Introduction: Decisions to withdraw or withhold curative or life-sustaining treatment can have a huge impact on the symptoms which the palliative-care team has to control. Palliative-care patients and their relatives may also turn to palliative-care physicians and nurses for advice regarding these treatments. We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians’ attitudes towards withholding and withdrawal of curative or life-sustaining treatment. Method: From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different (...)
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  13.  1
    Vicente Medina (1994). HIV and Entrenched Social Roles: Patients' Rights Vs. Physicians' Duties. Public Affairs Quarterly 8 (4):359-375.
    Physicians, so it will be argued have by virtue of their profession a weightier obligation than patients to disclose their HIV infection, and also have a duty to refrain from performing exposure-prone invasive procedures. This argument supports both the AMA and CDC guidelines on HIV infected health care workers (HCWS), while undermining the recommendations against disclosure suggested by the National Commission on AIDS (NCA). The argument is divided into three parts. First, a distinction is made between entrenched and fuzzy (...)
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  14.  4
    Reginald P. Sequeira, Khalid A. Jassim, Awatif H. H. Damanhori & Vijay S. Mathur (2002). Prescribing Pattern of Antihypertensive Drugs by Family Physicians and General Practitioners in the Primary Care Setting in Bahrain. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (4):407-414.
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  15.  1
    Khalid A. J. Al Khaja PhD, Reginald P. Sequeira PhD, Vijay S. Mathur Md D. Phil Fams, Awatif H. H. Damanhori MBBCh & Abdul Wahab M. Abdul Wahab Frcs (2002). Family Physicians' and General Practitioners' Approaches to Drug Management of Diabetic Hypertension in Primary Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):19-30.
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  16.  5
    J. J. Caro, C. N. Coleman, A. Knebel & E. G. DeRenzo (2010). Unaltered Ethical Standards for Individual Physicians in the Face of Drastically Reduced Resources Resulting From an Improvised Nuclear Device Event. Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (1):33-41.
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  17.  9
    Charlotte McDaniel (2010). Assessing Physicians' Roles on Health Care Ethics Committees. HEC Forum 22 (4):275-286.
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  18.  1
    Maria Del Refugio Gonzalez‐Losa, Glendy K. Gongora‐Marfil & Marylin Puerto‐Solis (2009). Knowledge About Cervical Cancer Screening Among Family Physicians: Cross‐Sectional Survey. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):289-291.
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  19.  1
    Tacettin Inandi Md, Nalan Sahin Md & Asuman Guraksin Md (2002). A Preliminary Study for the Development of a Scale to Assess Perceptions About Physicians. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):71-75.
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  20.  1
    Raphael Sassower (1990). Medical Education: The Training of Ethical Physicians. Studies in Philosophy and Education 10 (3):251-261.
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  21. D. Robert MacDougall (2013). Physicians' Strikes and the Competing Bases of Physicians' Moral Obligations. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (3):249-274.
    During the last several decades, professional medicine has undergone profound changes in its organization. In particular, the growth of managed care organizations and publicly funded medicine has increasingly standardized physician working conditions and reimbursement. While it is sometimes disputed whether the profession of medicine is suffering reduced autonomy as a whole, there is little doubt that individual physicians are losing autonomy (Burdi and Baker 1999; Harrison and Schulz 1989; Iglehart 1992). As a result, physicians are increasingly attracted to (...)
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  22.  26
    Matthew K. Wynia, Emily E. Anderson, Kavita Shah & Timothy D. Hotze (2011). “Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me…?” A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):3 - 13.
    Using medical advances to enhance human athletic, aesthetic, and cognitive performance, rather than to treat disease, has been controversial. Little is known about physicians? experiences, views, and attitudes in this regard. We surveyed a national sample of physicians to determine how often they prescribe enhancements, their views on using medicine for enhancement, and whether they would be willing to prescribe a series of potential interventions that might be considered enhancements. We find that many physicians occasionally prescribe enhancements, (...)
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  23. Dan W. Brock (2008). Conscientious Refusal by Physicians and Pharmacists: Who is Obligated to Do What, and Why? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):187-200.
    Some medical services have long generated deep moral controversy within the medical profession as well as in broader society and have led to conscientious refusals by some physicians to provide those services to their patients. More recently, pharmacists in a number of states have refused on grounds of conscience to fill legal prescriptions for their customers. This paper assesses these controversies. First, I offer a brief account of the basis and limits of the claim to be free to act (...)
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  24.  12
    Tony Hope & John McMillan (2012). Physicians' Duties and the Non-Identity Problem. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):21 - 29.
    The non-identity problem arises when an intervention or behavior changes the identity of those affected. Delaying pregnancy is an example of such a behavior. The problem is whether and in what ways such changes in identity affect moral considerations. While a great deal has been written about the non-identity problem, relatively little has been written about the implications for physicians and how they should understand their duties. We argue that the non-identity problem can make a crucial moral difference in (...)
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  25.  56
    Daniel Strech, Govind Persad, Georg Marckmann & Marion Danis (2009). Are Physicians Willing to Ration Health Care? Conflicting Findings in a Systematic Review of Survey Research. Health Policy 90 (2):113-124.
    Several quantitative surveys have been conducted internationally to gather empirical information about physicians’ general attitudes towards health care rationing. Are physicians ready to accept and implement rationing, or are they rather reluctant? Do they prefer implicit bedside rationing that allows the physician–patient relationship broad leeway in individual decisions? Or do physicians prefer strategies that apply explicit criteria and rules?
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  26.  82
    D. A. Barr (1996). The Ethics of Soviet Medical Practice: Behaviours and Attitudes of Physicians in Soviet Estonia. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (1):33-40.
    OBJECTIVES: To study and report the attitudes and practices of physicians in a former Soviet republic regarding issues pertaining to patients' rights, physician negligence and the acceptance of gratuities from patients. DESIGN: Survey questionnaire administered to physicians in 1991 at the time of the Soviet breakup. SETTING: Estonia, formerly a Soviet republic, now an independent state. SURVEY SAMPLE: A stratified, random sample of 1,000 physicians, representing approximately 20 per cent of practicing physicians under the age of (...)
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  27.  10
    Nicolas Tavaglione & Samia A. Hurst (2012). Why Physicians Ought to Lie for Their Patients. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):4-12.
    Sometimes physicians lie to third-party payers in order to grant their patients treatment they would otherwise not receive. This strategy, commonly known as gaming the system, is generally condemned for three reasons. First, it may hurt the patient for the sake of whom gaming was intended. Second, it may hurt other patients. Third, it offends contractual and distributive justice. Hence, gaming is considered to be immoral behavior. This article is an attempt to show that, on the contrary, gaming may (...)
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  28.  18
    Simon N. Whitney & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). Physicians' Silent Decisions: Because Patient Autonomy Does Not Always Come First. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):33 – 38.
    Physicians make some medical decisions without disclosure to their patients. Nondisclosure is possible because these are silent decisions to refrain from screening, diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Nondisclosure is ethically permissible when the usual presumption that the patient should be involved in decisions is defeated by considerations of clinical utility or patient emotional and physical well-being. Some silent decisions - not all - are ethically justified by this standard. Justified silent decisions are typically dependent on the physician's professional judgment, experience (...)
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  29.  15
    Rachel M. Werner, G. Caleb Alexander, Angela Fagerlin & Peter A. Ubel (2004). Lying to Insurance Companies: The Desire to Deceive Among Physicians and the Public. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):53-59.
    This study examines the public's and physicians' willingness to support deception of insurance companies in order to obtain necessary healthcare services and how this support varies based on perceptions of physicians' time pressures. Based on surveys of 700 prospective jurors and 1617 physicians, the public was more than twice as likely as physicians to sanction deception (26% versus 11%) and half as likely to believe that physicians have adequate time to appeal coverage decisions (22% versus (...)
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  30. Chalmers C. Clark (2005). In Harm's Way: AMA Physicians and the Duty to Treat. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):65 – 87.
    In June 2001, the American Medical Association (AMA) issued a revised and expanded version of the Principles of Medical Ethics (last published in 1980). In light of the new and more comprehensive document, the present essay is geared to consideration of a longstanding tension between physician's autonomy rights and societal obligations in the AMA Code. In particular, it will be argued that a duty to treat overrides AMA autonomy rights in social emergencies, even in cases that involve personal risk to (...)
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  31.  38
    Sam Rys, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Reginald Deschepper, Margaret Pabst Battin & Johan Bilsen (2013). Continuous Sedation Until Death: Moral Justifications of Physicians and Nurses—a Content Analysis of Opinion Pieces. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):533-542.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical-ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. A content analysis of opinion pieces in medical and nursing literature was conducted to examine how clinicians define and describe CSD, and how they justify this practice morally. Most publications were written by physicians and published in palliative or general medicine journals. Terminal Sedation and Palliative Sedation (...)
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  32.  10
    S. A. Hurst (2005). How Physicians Face Ethical Difficulties: A Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):7-14.
    Next SectionBackground: Physicians face ethical difficulties daily, yet they seek ethics consultation infrequently. To date, no systematic data have been collected on the strategies they use to resolve such difficulties when they do so without the help of ethics consultation. Thus, our understanding of ethical decision making in day to day medical practice is poor. We report findings from the qualitative analysis of 310 ethically difficult situations described to us by physicians who encountered them in their practice. When (...)
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  33. Philip Charles Hebert (2009). Doing Right: A Practical Guide to Ethics for Medical Trainees and Physicians. Oxford University Press.
    Doing Right: A Practical Guide to Ethics for Medical Trainees and Physicians is a concise and practical guide to ethical decision-making in medicine. The text is aimed at second- and third-year one-semester ethics courses offered in medical schools, health sciences departments, and nursing programs. By taking an applied approach rather than a theoretical approach, this text serves the needs of medical and nursing students, residents, and practicing physicians by sorting through questions of moral principles relevant to the diverse (...)
     
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  34.  14
    D. Strech, M. Synofzik & G. Marckmann (2008). How Physicians Allocate Scarce Resources at the Bedside: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):80-99.
    Although rationing of scarce health-care resources is inevitable in clinical practice, there is still limited and scattered information about how physicians perceive and execute this bedside rationing (BSR) and how it can be performed in an ethically fair way. This review gives a systematic overview on physicians’ perspectives on influences, strategies, and consequences of health-care rationing. Relevant references as identified by systematically screening major electronic databases and manuscript references were synthesized by thematic analysis. Retrieved studies focused on themes (...)
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  35.  7
    D. Wendler (2010). Are Physicians Obligated Always to Act in the Patient's Best Interests? Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):66-70.
    The principle that physicians should always act in the best interests of the present patient is widely endorsed. At the same time, and often within the same document, it is recognised that there are appropriate exceptions to this principle. Unfortunately, little, if any, guidance is provided regarding which exceptions are appropriate and how they should be handled. These circumstances might be tenable if the appropriate exceptions were rare. Yet, evaluation of the literature reveals that there are numerous exceptions, several (...)
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  36.  6
    E. Chwang, D. C. Landy & R. R. Sharp (2007). Views Regarding the Training of Ethics Consultants: A Survey of Physicians Caring for Patients in ICU. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (6):320-324.
    Background: Despite the expansion of ethics consultation services, questions remain about the aims of clinical ethics consultation, its methods and the expertise of those who provide such services.Objective: To describe physicians’ expectations regarding the training and skills necessary for ethics consultants to contribute effectively to the care of patients in intensive care unit .Design: Mailed survey.Participants: Physicians responsible for the care of at least 10 patients in ICU over a 6-month period at a 921-bed private teaching hospital with (...)
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  37.  5
    A. Ahmadi (2014). Ethical Issues in Hymenoplasty: Views From Tehran's Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):429-430.
    Hymenoplasty, practiced in societies wherein a woman's virginity signifies honour, is a controversial surgery raising a multitude of ethical issues. There is a dearth of research uncovering the views of physicians who perform hymenoplasty, especially in sexually conservative cultures, such as Iran. Interviews were conducted with five Iranian physicians who perform hymenoplasty to determine their ethical views on the surgery. The interview findings suggest that Iranian physicians risk punitive consequences if they are discovered to be offering hymenoplasty. (...)
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  38.  9
    G. K. Silverman, G. F. Loewenstein, B. L. Anderson, P. A. Ubel, S. Zinberg & J. Schulkin (2010). Failure to Discount for Conflict of Interest When Evaluating Medical Literature: A Randomised Trial of Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):265-270.
    Context Physicians are regularly confronted with research that is funded or presented by industry. Objective To assess whether physicians discount for conflicts of interest when weighing evidence for prescribing a new drug. Design and setting Participants were presented with an abstract from a single clinical trial finding positive results for a fictitious new drug. Physicians were randomly assigned one version of a hypothetical scenario, which varied on conflict of interest: ‘presenter conflict’, ‘researcher conflict’ and ‘no conflict’. Participants (...)
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  39. A. Asai, S. Fukuhara, O. Inoshita, Y. Miura, N. Tanabe & K. Kurokawa (1997). Medical Decisions Concerning the End of Life: A Discussion with Japanese Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):323-327.
    OBJECTIVES: Life-sustaining treatment at the end of life gives rise to many ethical problems in Japan. Recent surveys of Japanese physicians suggested that they tend to treat terminally ill patients aggressively. We studied why Japanese physicians were reluctant to withhold or withdraw life-support from terminally ill patients and what affected their decisions. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A qualitative study design was employed, using a focus group interview with seven physicians, to gain an in-depth understanding of attitudes and rationales (...)
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  40.  21
    Robert M. Veatch (2000). Doctor Does Not Know Best: Why in the New Century Physicians Must Stop Trying to Benefit Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even (...)
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  41.  13
    H. M. Buiting, A. van der Heide, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, M. L. Rurup, J. A. C. Rietjens, G. Borsboom, P. J. van der Maas & J. J. M. van Delden (2010). Physicians' Labelling of End-of-Life Practices: A Hypothetical Case Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):24-29.
    Objectives: To investigate why physicians label end-of-life acts as either ‘euthanasia/ending of life’ or ‘alleviation of symptoms/palliative or terminal sedation’, and to study the association of such labelling with intended reporting of these acts. Methods: Questionnaires were sent to a random, stratified sample of 2100 Dutch physicians. They were asked to label six hypothetical end-of-life cases: three ‘standard’ cases and three cases randomly selected, that varied according to type of medication, physician’s intention, type of patient request, patient’s life (...)
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  42.  4
    Joshua E. Perry, Dena Cox & Anthony D. Cox (2014). Trust and Transparency: Patient Perceptions of Physicians' Financial Relationships with Pharmaceutical Companies. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (4):475-491.
    Financial ties between physicians and pharmaceutical companies are pervasive and controversial. However, little is known about how patients perceive such ties. This paper describes an experiment examining how a national sample of U.S. adults perceived a variety of financial relationships between physicians and drug companies. Each respondent read a single scenario about a hypothetical physician and his financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry; scenarios varied in terms of payment type of and amount. Respondents then evaluated the physician on (...)
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  43.  5
    Rebecca Bamford (2014). Getting Even More Specific About Physicians' Obligations: Justice, Responsibility, and Professionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (9):46-47.
    (2014). Getting Even More Specific About Physicians’ Obligations: Justice, Responsibility, and Professionalism. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 14, No. 9, pp. 46-47.
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  44.  4
    Sabine Beck, Andreas van de Loo & Stella Reiter-Theil (2008). A “Little Bit Illegal”? Withholding and Withdrawing of Mechanical Ventilation in the Eyes of German Intensive Care Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):7-16.
    Research questions and backgroundThis study explores a highly controversial issue of medical care in Germany: the decision to withhold or withdraw mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients. It analyzes difficulties in making these decisions and the physicians’ uncertainty in understanding the German terminology of Sterbehilfe, which is used in the context of treatment limitation. Used in everyday language, the word Sterbehilfe carries connotations such as helping the patient in the dying process or helping the patient to enter the dying (...)
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  45.  90
    C. Meyers & R. D. Woods (1996). An Obligation to Provide Abortion Services: What Happens When Physicians Refuse? Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (2):115-120.
    Access to abortion services in the United States continues to decline. It does so not because of significant changes in legislation or court rulings but because fewer and fewer physicians wish to perform abortions and because most states now have "conscientious objection" legislation that makes it easy for physicians to refuse to do so. We argue in this paper that physicians have an obligation to perform all socially sanctioned medical services, including abortions, and thus that the burden (...)
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  46.  9
    Aaron D. Levine & Leslie E. Wolf (2012). The Roles and Responsibilities of Physicians in Patients' Decisions About Unproven Stem Cell Therapies. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (1):122-134.
    Capitalizing on the hype surrounding stem cell research, numerous clinics around the world offer “stem cell therapies” for a variety of medical conditions. Despite questions about the safety and efficacy of these interventions, anecdotal evidence suggests a relatively large number of patients are traveling to receive these unproven treatments — a practice called “stem cell tourism.” Because these unproven treatments pose risks to individual patients and to legitimate translational stem cell research, stem cell tourism has generated substantial policy concern and (...)
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  47.  9
    J. Cohen, J. van Delden, F. Mortier, R. Lofmark, M. Norup, C. Cartwright, K. Faisst, C. Canova, B. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & J. Bilsen (2008). Influence of Physicians' Life Stances on Attitudes to End-of-Life Decisions and Actual End-of-Life Decision-Making in Six Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):247-253.
    Aim: To examine how physicians’ life stances affect their attitudes to end-of-life decisions and their actual end-of-life decision-making.Methods: Practising physicians from various specialties involved in the care of dying patients in Belgium, Denmark, The Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland and Australia received structured questionnaires on end-of-life care, which included questions about their life stance. Response rates ranged from 53% in Australia to 68% in Denmark. General attitudes, intended behaviour with respect to two hypothetical patients, and actual behaviour were compared between (...)
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  48.  21
    Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks, Rory Johnston & Shafik Dharamsi (2013). “Do Your Homework…and Then Hope for the Best”: The Challenges That Medical Tourism Poses to Canadian Family Physicians' Support of Patients' Informed Decision-Making. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):37.
    Medical tourism—the practice where patients travel internationally to privately access medical care—may limit patients’ regular physicians’ abilities to contribute to the informed decision-making process. We address this issue by examining ways in which Canadian family doctors’ typical involvement in patients’ informed decision-making is challenged when their patients engage in medical tourism.
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  49.  6
    M. Cetin, M. Ucar, T. Guven, A. Atac & M. Ozer (2012). What Do Patients Expect From Their Physicians? Qualitative Research on the Ethical Aspects of Patient Statements. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (2):112-116.
    This study aimed to examine the thoughts and expectations of patients receiving healthcare from their physicians and evaluate the ethical aspects of these thoughts and expectations. To determine the ethical aspects of the thoughts and expectations of patients, an open-ended question was asked on the web page of the Turkish Armed Forces (TAF) Health Care Command, which is accessible to the users of the TAF intranet system (the internet system used within TAF institutions). The participants were asked to express (...)
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  50.  2
    K. Raus, L. Anquinet, J. Rietjens, L. Deliens, F. Mortier & S. Sterckx (2014). Factors That Facilitate or Constrain the Use of Continuous Sedation at the End of Life by Physicians and Nurses in Belgium: Results From a Focus Group Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):230-234.
    Continuous sedation at the end of life is the practice whereby a physician uses sedatives to reduce or take away a patient's consciousness until death. Although the incidence of CS is rising, as of yet little research has been conducted on how the administration of CS is experienced by medical practitioners. Existing research shows that many differences exist between medical practitioners regarding how and how often they perform CS. We conducted a focus group study to find out which factors may (...)
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