Search results for 'Physicians' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Satish P. Deshpande (2009). A Study of Ethical Decision Making by Physicians and Nurses in Hospitals. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):387 - 397.score: 18.0
    This research investigates the impact of various factors on ethical behavior of 180 not-for-profit hospital employees. Ethical behavior of peers, ethical behavior of successful managers, and emotional intelligence had a significant positive impact on ethical behavior of respondents. Physicians and hospital employees with political connections within the organization were significantly less ethical than other employees. The results have many implications for researchers and healthcare practitioners.
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  2. Marc A. Rodwin (1993). Medicine, Money, and Morals: Physicians' Conflicts of Interest. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Conflicts of interest are rampant in the American medical community. Today it is not uncommon for doctors to refer patients to clinics or labs in which they have a financial interest (40% of physicians in Florida invest in medical centers); for hospitals to offer incentives to physicians who refer patients (a practice that can lead to unnecessary hospitalization); or for drug companies to provide lucrative give-aways to entice doctors to use their "brand name" drugs (which are much more (...)
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  3. Robin R. Radtke (2008). Role Morality in the Accounting Profession – How Do We Compare to Physicians and Attorneys? Journal of Business Ethics 79 (3):279 - 297.score: 18.0
    Role morality can be defined as “claim(ing) a moral permission to harm others in ways that, if not for the role, would be wrong” (A. Applbaum: 1999, Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life (Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ) p. 3). Adversarial situations resulting in role morality occur most frequently in the fields of law, business, and government. Within the realm of accounting, professional obligations may place the accountant in a situation where he/she is susceptible (...)
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  4. Charlotte McDaniel (2010). Assessing Physicians' Roles on Health Care Ethics Committees. HEC Forum 22 (4):275-286.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of physicians on HEC including structural and process features. Four committees were selected from among 12 volunteering to participate with 12 sessions observed. Power analysis (0.8) confirmed an adequate number of communication exchanges, and no statistical significant difference (p < 0.05) among two prior surveys affirmed the sample. Data collection included established questionnaires and communication analyses with a tested method. Results revealed physician presence was robust and similar to prior (...)
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  5. Susan L. Norris, Haley K. Holmer, Lauren A. Ogden, Brittany U. Burda & Rongwei Fu (2012). Characteristics of Physicians Receiving Large Payments From Pharmaceutical Companies and the Accuracy of Their Disclosures in Publications: An Observational Study. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):24-.score: 18.0
    Background Financial relationships between physicians and industry are extensive and public reporting of industry payments to physicians is now occurring. Our objectives were to describe physician recipients of large total payments from these seven companies, and to examine discrepancies between these payments and conflict of interest (COI) disclosures in authors’ concurrent publications. Methods The investigative journalism organization, ProPublica, compiled the Dollars for Docs database of payments to individuals from publically available data from seven US pharmaceutical companies during the (...)
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  6. Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Katherine M. James & Jon C. Tilburt (2013). The Moral Psychology of Rationing Among Physicians: The Role of Harm and Fairness Intuitions in Physician Objections to Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Containment. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):13.score: 18.0
    Physicians vary in their moral judgments about health care costs. Social intuitionism posits that moral judgments arise from gut instincts, called “moral foundations.” The objective of this study was to determine if “harm” and “fairness” intuitions can explain physicians’ judgments about cost-containment in U.S. health care and using cost-effectiveness data in practice, as well as the relative importance of those intuitions compared to “purity”, “authority” and “ingroup” in cost-related judgments.
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  7. D. C. Malloy, P. Sevigny, T. Hadjistavropoulos, M. Jeyaraj, E. Fahey McCarthy, M. Murakami, S. Paholpak, Y. Lee & I. Park (2009). Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Ethical Guidelines: An International Study of Physicians. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):373-383.score: 18.0
    The intent of ethics is to establish a set of standards that will provide a framework to modify, regulate, and possibly enhance moral behaviour. Eleven focus groups were conducted with physicians from six culturally distinct countries to explore their perception of formalized, written ethical guidelines (i.e., codes of ethics, credos, value and mission statements) that attempt to direct their ethical practice. Six themes emerged from the data: lack of awareness, no impact, marginal impact, other codes or value statements supersede, (...)
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  8. Silviya Aleksandrova (2008). Survey on the Experience in Ethical Decision-Making and Attitude of Pleven University Hospital Physicians Towards Ethics Consultation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):35-42.score: 18.0
    BackgroundContemporary medical practice is complicated by many dilemmas requiring ethical sensitivity and moral reasoning.ObjectiveTo investigate physicians’ experience in ethical decision-making and their attitude towards ethics consultation.MethodsIn a cross-sectional survey 126 physicians representing the main clinics of Pleven University hospital were investigated by a self-administered questionnaire. The following variables were measured: occurrence, nature and ways of resolving ethical problems; physicians’ attitudes towards ethics consultation; physicians’ opinions on qualities and skills of an ethics consultant, and socio-demographic characteristics. Data (...)
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  9. Joris Gielen, Sushma Bhatnagar, Seema Mishra, Arvind K. Chaturvedi, Harmala Gupta, Ambika Rajvanshi, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert (2011). Can Curative or Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Withheld or Withdrawn? The Opinions and Views of Indian Palliative-Care Nurses and Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):5-18.score: 18.0
    Introduction: Decisions to withdraw or withhold curative or life-sustaining treatment can have a huge impact on the symptoms which the palliative-care team has to control. Palliative-care patients and their relatives may also turn to palliative-care physicians and nurses for advice regarding these treatments. We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians’ attitudes towards withholding and withdrawal of curative or life-sustaining treatment. Method: From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different (...)
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  10. Samia A. Hurst, Stella Reiter-Theil, Arnaud Perrier, Reidun Forde, Anne-Marie Slowther, Renzo Pegoraro & Marion Danis (2007). Physicians' Access to Ethics Support Services in Four European Countries. Health Care Analysis 15 (4):321-335.score: 18.0
    Clinical ethics support services are developing in Europe. They will be most useful if they are designed to match the ethical concerns of clinicians. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey on random samples of general physicians in Norway, Switzerland, Italy, and the UK, to assess their access to different types of ethics support services, and to describe what makes them more likely to have used available ethics support. Respondents reported access to formal ethics support services such as clinical ethics (...)
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  11. G. K. Kimsma (2010). Death by Request in The Netherlands: Facts, the Legal Context and Effects on Physicians, Patients and Families. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):355-361.score: 18.0
    In this article I intend to describe an issue of the Dutch euthanasia practice that is not common knowledge. After some general introductory descriptions, by way of formulating a frame of reference, I shall describe the effects of this practice on patients, physicians and families, followed by a more philosophical reflection on the significance of these effects for the assessment of the authenticity of a request and the nature of unbearable suffering, two key concepts in the procedure towards euthanasia (...)
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  12. Vicente Medina (1994). HIV and Entrenched Social Roles: Patients' Rights Vs. Physicians' Duties. Public Affairs Quarterly 8 (4):359-375.score: 18.0
    Physicians, so it will be argued have by virtue of their profession a weightier obligation than patients to disclose their HIV infection, and also have a duty to refrain from performing exposure-prone invasive procedures. This argument supports both the AMA and CDC guidelines on HIV infected health care workers (HCWS), while undermining the recommendations against disclosure suggested by the National Commission on AIDS (NCA). The argument is divided into three parts. First, a distinction is made between entrenched and fuzzy (...)
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  13. J. J. Caro, C. N. Coleman, A. Knebel & E. G. DeRenzo (2010). Unaltered Ethical Standards for Individual Physicians in the Face of Drastically Reduced Resources Resulting From an Improvised Nuclear Device Event. Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (1):33-41.score: 15.0
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  14. Reginald P. Sequeira, Khalid A. Jassim, Awatif H. H. Damanhori & Vijay S. Mathur (2002). Prescribing Pattern of Antihypertensive Drugs by Family Physicians and General Practitioners in the Primary Care Setting in Bahrain. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (4):407-414.score: 15.0
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  15. Maria Del Refugio Gonzalez‐Losa, Glendy K. Gongora‐Marfil & Marylin Puerto‐Solis (2009). Knowledge About Cervical Cancer Screening Among Family Physicians: Cross‐Sectional Survey. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):289-291.score: 15.0
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  16. Martine C. de Vries, Mirjam Houtlosser, Jan M. Wit, Dirk P. Engberts, Dorine Bresters, Gertjan Jl Kaspers & Evert van Leeuwen (2011). Ethical Issues at the Interface of Clinical Care and Research Practice in Pediatric Oncology: A Narrative Review of Parents' and Physicians' Experiences. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):18.score: 15.0
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  17. Tacettin Inandi Md, Nalan Sahin Md & Asuman Guraksin Md (2002). A Preliminary Study for the Development of a Scale to Assess Perceptions About Physicians. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):71-75.score: 15.0
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  18. Khalid A. J. Al Khaja PhD, Reginald P. Sequeira PhD, Vijay S. Mathur Md D. Phil Fams, Awatif H. H. Damanhori MBBCh & Abdul Wahab M. Abdul Wahab Frcs (2002). Family Physicians' and General Practitioners' Approaches to Drug Management of Diabetic Hypertension in Primary Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):19-30.score: 15.0
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  19. Raphael Sassower (1990). Medical Education: The Training of Ethical Physicians. Studies in Philosophy and Education 10 (3):251-261.score: 15.0
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  20. R. Stephen Parker & Charles E. Pettijohn (2003). Ethical Considerations in the Use of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Pharmaceutical Promotions: The Impact on Pharmaceutical Sales and Physicians. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):279-290.score: 14.0
    The influence of direct-to-consumer advertising and physician promotions are examined in this study. We further examine some of the ethical issues which may arise when physicians accept promotional products from pharmaceutical companies. The data revealed that direct-to-consumer advertising is likely to increase the request rates of both the drug category and the drug brand choices, as well as the likelihood that those drugs will be prescribed by physicians. The data further revealed that the majority of responding physicians (...)
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  21. Tal Bergman Levy, Shlomi Azar, Ronen Huberfeld, Andrew M. Siegel & Rael D. Strous (2013). Attitudes Towards Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Comparison Between Psychiatrists and Other Physicians. Bioethics 27 (7):402-408.score: 14.0
    Euthanasia and physician assisted-suicide are terms used to describe the process in which a doctor of a sick or disabled individual engages in an activity which directly or indirectly leads to their death. This behavior is engaged by the healthcare provider based on their humanistic desire to end suffering and pain. The psychiatrist's involvement may be requested in several distinct situations including evaluation of patient capacity when an appeal for euthanasia is requested on grounds of terminal somatic illness or when (...)
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  22. Lenny López & Arthur J. Dyck (2009). Educating Physicians for Moral Excellence in the Twenty-First Century. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):651-668.score: 14.0
    Medical professionals are a community of highly educated individuals with a commitment to a core set of ideals and principles. This community provides both technical and ethical socialization. The ideal physician is confident, empathic, forthright, respectful, and thorough. These ideals allow us to define broadly "the excellence" of being a physician. At the core of these ideals is the ability to be empathic. Empathy exhibits itself in attributes of an individual's moral character and also in actions that actualize and support (...)
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  23. William E. Stempsey (1999). The Quarantine of Philosophy in Medical Education: Why Teaching the Humanities May Not Produce Humane Physicians. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):3-9.score: 14.0
    Patients increasingly see physicians not as humane caregivers but as unfeeling technicians. The study of philosophy in medical school has been proposed to foster critical thinking about one's assumptions, perspectives and biases, encourage greater tolerance toward the ideas of others, and cultivate empathy. I suggest that the study of ethics and philosophy by medical students has failed to produce the humane physicians we seek because of the way the subject matter is quarantined in American medical education. First, the (...)
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  24. Greg M. Thibadoux, Marsha Scheidt & Elizabeth Luckey (2007). Accounting and Medicine: An Exploratory Investigation Into Physicians' Attitudes Toward the Use of Standard Cost-Accounting Methods in Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (2):137 - 149.score: 14.0
    Research studies demonstrate wide variation in how physicians diagnose and treat patients with similar medical conditions and suggest that at least some of the variation reflects inefficiencies and unnecessary medical costs. Health care researchers are actively examining ways to reduce variations in practice through standardization of medicine to reduce the cost of treatment and ensure the quality of outcomes. The most widely accepted form of this standardization is Evidence Based Best Practices (EBBP). Furthermore, financial health care providers such as (...)
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  25. B. S. Elger (2009). Factors Influencing Attitudes Towards Medical Confidentiality Among Swiss Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):517-524.score: 14.0
    Medical confidentiality is a core concept of professionalism and should be an integral part of pregraduate and postgraduate medical education. The aim of our study was to define the factors influencing attitudes towards patient confidentiality in everyday situations in order to define the need for offering further education to various subgroups of physicians. All internists and general practitioners who were registered members of the association of physicians in Geneva or who were working in the department of internal medicine (...)
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  26. Jonathan R. Scarff & Steven Lippmann (2012). When Physicians Intervene in Their Relatives' Health Care. HEC Forum 24 (2):127-137.score: 14.0
    Physicians often struggle with ethical issues surrounding intervention in their relatives’ health care. Many editorials, letters, and surveys have been written on this topic, but there is no systematic review of its prevalence. An Ovid Medline search was conducted for articles in English, written between January 1950 and December 2010, using the key words family member, relatives, treatment, prescribing, physician, and ethics. The search identified 41 articles (editorials, letters, and surveys). Surveys were reviewed to explore demographics of these treating (...)
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  27. Dominika W. Wranik & Martine Durier-Copp (2010). Physician Remuneration Methods for Family Physicians in Canada: Expected Outcomes and Lessons Learned. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (1):35-59.score: 14.0
    Canada is a leader in experimenting with alternative, non fee for service provider remuneration methods; all jurisdictions have implemented salaries and payment models that blend fee for service with salary or capitation components. A series of qualitative interviews were held with 27 stakeholders in the Canadian health care system to assess the reasons and expectations behind the implementation of these payment methods for family physicians, as well as the extent to which objectives have been achieved. Results indicate that the (...)
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  28. Bethany Crandell Goodier & Michael Irvin Arrington (2007). Physicians, Patients, and Medical Dialogue in the NYPD Blue Prostate Cancer Story. Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (1):45-58.score: 14.0
    Extending literature on health information to entertainment television, we analyze the prostate cancer narrative presented in the police drama, NYPD Blue. We explain how the physician-patient interaction depicted on the show followed (and sometimes did not follow) the medical dialogue model. Findings reveal that the producers of this show advocate a more dialogic model of medical interaction. Portrayals of incompetent, ineffective physicians are contrasted with the superior, effective efforts of other physicians. The audience learns that a non-dialogic approach (...)
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  29. Dan W. Brock (2008). Conscientious Refusal by Physicians and Pharmacists: Who is Obligated to Do What, and Why? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):187-200.score: 12.0
    Some medical services have long generated deep moral controversy within the medical profession as well as in broader society and have led to conscientious refusals by some physicians to provide those services to their patients. More recently, pharmacists in a number of states have refused on grounds of conscience to fill legal prescriptions for their customers. This paper assesses these controversies. First, I offer a brief account of the basis and limits of the claim to be free to act (...)
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  30. Gary Seay (2005). Euthanasia and Physicians' Moral Duties. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (5):517 – 533.score: 12.0
    Opponents of euthanasia sometimes argue that it is incompatible with the purpose of medicine, since physicians have an unconditional duty never to intentionally cause death. But it is not clear how such a duty could ever actually be unconditional, if due consideration is given to the moral weight of countervailing duties equally fundamental to medicine. Whether physicians' moral duties are understood as correlative with patients' moral rights or construed noncorrelatively, a doctor's obligation to abstain from intentional killing cannot (...)
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  31. J. L. A. Garcia (2007). Health Versus Harm: Euthanasia and Physicians' Duties. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (1):7 – 24.score: 12.0
    This essay rebuts Gary Seay's efforts to show that committing euthanasia need not conflict with a physician's professional duties. First, I try to show how his misunderstanding of the correlativity of rights and duties and his discussion of the foundation of moral rights undermine his case. Second, I show aspects of physicians' professional duties that clash with euthanasia, and that attempts to avoid this clash lead to absurdities. For professional duties are best understood as deriving from professional virtues and (...)
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  32. John Sutton (2003). Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):142 – 144.score: 12.0
    Book Information Psyche And Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem from Antiquity to Enlightenment. Psyche And Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem from Antiquity to Enlightenment John P. Wright Paul Potter Oxford Clarendon Press 2000 xii + 298, Hardback £45.00 Edited by John P. Wright; Paul Potter . Clarendon Press. Oxford. Pp. xii + 298,. Hardback:£45.00.
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  33. David J. Doukas, Using the Family Covenant in Planning End-of-Life Care: Obligations and Promises of Patients, Families, and Physicians.score: 12.0
    Physicians and families need to interact more meaningfully to clarify the values and preferences at stake in advance care planning. The current use of advance directives fails to respect patient autonomy. This paper proposes using the family covenant as a preventive ethics process designed to improve end-of-life planning by incorporating other family members—as agreed to by the patient and those family members—into the medical care dialogue. The family covenant formulates advance directives in conversation with family members and with the (...)
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  34. Gary Seay (2001). Do Physicians Have an Inviolable Duty Not to Kill? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):75 – 91.score: 12.0
    An important part of the debate over physician-assisted suicide concerns moral duties that are specific to physicians. It is sometimes argued that physicians, by virtue of special commitments rooted in the nature of their profession, may never intentionally kill a patient, and that therefore, whether or not assisted suicide may be justifiable, it can never be right for a physician to take part in such an act. I examine four types of argument that have been offered in support (...)
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  35. Delon Human (2002). Conflicts of Interest in Science and Medicine: The Physician's Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):273-276.score: 12.0
    The various statements and declarations of the World Medical Association that address conflicts of interest on the part of physicians as (1) researchers, and (2) practitioners, are examined, with particular reference to the October 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki. Recent contributions to the literature, notably on conflicts of interest in medical research, are noted. Finally, key provisions of the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics (2000–2001 Edition) that address the various forms of conflict of interest that (...)
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  36. Matthew K. Wynia, Emily E. Anderson, Kavita Shah & Timothy D. Hotze (2011). “Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me…?” A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):3 - 13.score: 12.0
    Using medical advances to enhance human athletic, aesthetic, and cognitive performance, rather than to treat disease, has been controversial. Little is known about physicians? experiences, views, and attitudes in this regard. We surveyed a national sample of physicians to determine how often they prescribe enhancements, their views on using medicine for enhancement, and whether they would be willing to prescribe a series of potential interventions that might be considered enhancements. We find that many physicians occasionally prescribe enhancements, (...)
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  37. Atul Gawande, Deborah W. Denno, Robert D. Truog & David Waisel, Physicians and Execution: Highlights From a Discussion of Lethal Injection.score: 12.0
    This article constitutes excerpts of a videotaped discussion hosted by the New England Journal of Medicine on January 14, 2008, concerning a range of topics on lethal injection prompted by the United States Supreme Court's January 7 oral arguments in Baze v. Rees. Dr. Atul Gawande moderated the roundtable that included two anesthesiologists - Dr. Robert Truog and Dr. David Waisel - as well as law professor Deborah Denno. The discussion focused on the drugs used in lethal injection executions, whether (...)
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  38. M. H. Gendel, E. Brooks, S. R. Early, D. C. Gundersen, S. L. Dubovsky, S. L. Dilts & J. H. Shore (2012). Self-Prescribed and Other Informal Care Provided by Physicians: Scope, Correlations and Implications. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):294-298.score: 12.0
    Background While it is generally acknowledged that self-prescribing among physicians poses some risk, research finds such behaviour to be common and in certain cases accepted by the medical community. Largely absent from the literature is knowledge about other activities doctors perform for their own medical care or for the informal treatment of family and friends. This study examined the variety, frequency and association of behaviours doctors report providing informally. Informal care included prescriptions, as well as any other type of (...)
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  39. Robert M. Veatch (2000). Doctor Does Not Know Best: Why in the New Century Physicians Must Stop Trying to Benefit Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.score: 12.0
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even (...)
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  40. Carl H. Coleman (2009). Do Physicians' Legal Duties to Patients Conflict with Public Health Values? The Case of Antibiotic Overprescription. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):181-185.score: 12.0
    Among the many explanations for antibiotic overprescription, some doctors cite the risk of malpractice liability if they deny a patient's request for an antibiotic and the patient's condition worsens. In this paper, I examine the merits of this concern—i.e., whether physicians could, in fact, face malpractice liability for refusing to prescribe an antibiotic when, from a public health perspective, the use of the antibiotic would be considered inappropriate. I conclude that the potential for liability cannot be dismissed entirely, but (...)
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  41. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1999). What is an Oath and Why Should a Physician Swear One? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (4):329-346.score: 12.0
    While there has been much discussion about the role of oaths in medical ethics, this discussion has previously centered on the content of various oaths. Little conceptual work has been done to clarify what an oath is, or to show how an oath differs from a promise or a code of ethics, or to explore what general role oath-taking by physicians might play in medical ethics. Oaths, like promises, are performative utterances. But oaths are generally characterized by their greater (...)
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  42. Jacqueline K. Eastman, Kevin L. Eastman & Michael A. Tolson (2001). The Relationship Between Ethical Ideology and Ethical Behavior Intentions: An Exploratory Look at Physicians' Responses to Managed Care Dilemmas. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 31 (3):209 - 224.score: 12.0
    Within the past few years, managed care health insurance programs have become commonplace. With managed care programs, however, physicians are facing increasing ethical pressures. This paper examines the relationship between physicians'' behavior intentions with respect to four managed care ethical scenarios and their responses to Forsyth''s (1980) Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ). This is one of the first papers to compare this scale to behavioral intentions in the workplace. We provide a literature review of the ethical dilemmas that doctors (...)
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  43. Shaili Jain (2007). Understanding Physician-Pharmaceutical Industry Interactions. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    Physician-pharmaceutical industry interactions continue to generate heated debate in academic and public domains, both in the United States and abroad. Despite this, recent research suggests that physicians and physicians-in-training remain ignorant of the core issues and are ill-prepared to understand pharmaceutical industry promotion. There is a vast medical literature on this topic, but no single, concise resource. This book aims to fill that gap by providing a resource that explains the essential elements of this subject. The text makes (...)
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  44. Simon N. Whitney & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). Physicians' Silent Decisions: Because Patient Autonomy Does Not Always Come First. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):33 – 38.score: 12.0
    Physicians make some medical decisions without disclosure to their patients. Nondisclosure is possible because these are silent decisions to refrain from screening, diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Nondisclosure is ethically permissible when the usual presumption that the patient should be involved in decisions is defeated by considerations of clinical utility or patient emotional and physical well-being. Some silent decisions - not all - are ethically justified by this standard. Justified silent decisions are typically dependent on the physician's professional judgment, experience (...)
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  45. Hani Tamim, Amr Jamal, Huda Al Shamsi, Abdulla Al Sayyari & Fayez Hejaili (2010). Professional Boundary Ethics Attitudes and Awareness Among Nurses and Physicians in a University Hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Ethics and Behavior 20 (1):21-32.score: 12.0
    This study sought to gauge ethical attitudes about professional boundary issues of physicians and nurses in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Respondents scored 10 relevant boundary vignettes as to their ethical acceptability. The group as a whole proved “aware/ ethically conservative,” but with the physicians' score falling on the “less ethically conservative” part of the spectrum compared to nurses. The degree of ethicality was more related to profession than to gender, with nurses being more “ethical” than physicians.
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  46. J. David Hester (2004). Intersex(Es) and Informed Consent: How Physicians' Rhetoric Constrains Choice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):21-49.score: 12.0
    When a child is born with ambiguousgenitalia it is declared a psychosocialemergency, and the policy first proposed byJohn Money (Johns Hopkins University) andadapted by the American Academy of Pediatrics(and more broadly accepted in Canada, the U.K.,and Europe) requires determination ofunderlying condition(s), selection of gender,surgical intervention, and a commitment by allparties to accept the ``real sex'' of thepatient, all no later than 18–24 months,preferably earlier. Ethicists have recentlyquestioned this protocol on several grounds:lack of medical necessity, violation ofinformed consent, uncertainty of (...)
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  47. Gerald Logue (1994). Toleration of Moral Diversity and the Conscientious Refusal by Physicians to Withdraw Life-Sustaining Treatment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (2):147-159.score: 12.0
    The removal of life-sustaining treatment often brings physicians into conflict with patients. Because of their moral beliefs physicians often respond slowly to the request of patients or their families. People in bioethics have been quick to recommend that in cases of conflict the physician should simply sign off the case and "step aside". This is not easily done psychologically or morally. Such a resolution also masks a number of more subtle, quite trouble some problems that conflict with the (...)
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  48. Autumn Fiester (2004). Physicians and Strikes: Can a Walkout Over the Malpractice Crisis Be Ethically Justified? American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):12 – 16.score: 12.0
    Malpractice insurance rates have created a crisis in American medicine. Rates are rising and reimbursements are not keeping pace. In response, physicians in the states hardest hit by this crisis are feeling compelled to take political action, and the current action of choice seems to be physician strikes. While the malpractice insurance crisis is acknowledged to be severe, does it justify the extreme action of a physician walkout? Should physicians engage in this type of collective action, and what (...)
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  49. Carlos López-Beltrán (2004). In the Cradle of Heredity; French Physicians and L'Hérédité Naturelle in the Early 19th Century. Journal of the History of Biology 37 (1):39 - 72.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that our modern concept of biological heredity was first clearly introduced in a theoretical and practical setting by the generation of French physicians that were active between 1810 and 1830. It describes how from a traditional focus on hereditary transmission of disease, influential French medical men like Esquirol, Fodéré, Piorry, Lévy, moved towards considering heredity a central concept for the conception of the human bodily frame, and its set of physical and moral dispositions. The notion of (...)
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  50. Maximiliane Jansky, Gabriella Marx, Friedemann Nauck & Bernd Alt-Epping (2013). Physicians' and Nurses' Expectations and Objections Toward a Clinical Ethics Committee. Nursing Ethics 20 (7):0969733013478308.score: 12.0
    The study aimed to explore the subjective need of healthcare professionals for ethics consultation, their experience with ethical conflicts, and expectations and objections toward a Clinical Ethics Committee. Staff at a university hospital took part in a survey (January to June 2010) using a questionnaire with open and closed questions. Descriptive data for physicians and nurses (response rate = 13.5%, n = 101) are presented. Physicians and nurses reported similar high frequencies of ethical conflicts but rated the relevance (...)
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