Search results for 'Privacy, Right of' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Justina Balčiūnaitė & Lijana Štarienė (2010). Right to Privacy V. European Commission's Expanded Power of Inspection According to Regulation 1/2003. Jurisprudence 121 (3):115-132.score: 648.0
    Regulation No 17: First Regulation implementing Articles 85 and 86 of the Treaty set out that in carrying out the duties assigned to it by Article 89 and by provisions adopted under Article 87 of the Treaty, the officials authorized by the EU Commission were empowered inter alia to enter any premises, land and means of transport of undertakings. Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2003 of 16 December 2002 on the implementation of the rules on competition laid down in Articles 81 (...)
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  2. Birutė Pranevičienė (2011). Limiting of the Right to Privacy in the Context of Protection of National Security. Jurisprudence 18 (4):1609-1622.score: 558.0
    For the last several decades, ensuring human rights and national security have remained an important goal and a condition for existence of every state. The interests of national security often presuppose the need to narrow some natural rights, such as, for example, the right to privacy, the right to secrecy of communication, etc. Traditional concept of security is related to ensuring national security. According to the traditional concept of security, the state is considered the main object of security; (...)
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  3. Michael Cranford (1998). Drug Testing and the Right to Privacy: Arguing the Ethics of Workplace Drug Testing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (16):1805-1815.score: 495.0
    As drug testing has become increasingly used to maximize corporate profits by minimizing the economic impact of employee substance abuse, numerous arguments have been advanced which draw the ethical justification for such testing into question, including the position that testing amounts to a violation of employee privacy by attempting to regulate an employee's behavior in her own home, outside the employer's legitimate sphere of control. This article first proposes that an employee's right to privacy is violated when personal information (...)
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  4. Janet E. Smith (2008). The Right to Privacy. Ignatius Press.score: 441.0
    Foreword by Robert H. Bork -- Culture wars -- A distorted understanding of rights -- The right to privacy -- Griswold and contraception -- Roe and abortion -- Assisted suicide and homosexuality -- Political connections and natural consequences.
     
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  5. J. L. Cohenova (2001). Democracy, Differences and the Right of Privacy. Filosoficky Casopis 49 (2):273-307.score: 435.0
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  6. Kent Greenawalt (1976). Restricting the Right of Privacy: The Burger Court and Claims of Privacy. Hastings Center Report 6 (4):19-20.score: 435.0
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  7. Stephen Coleman (2006). E-Mail, Terrorism, and the Right to Privacy. Ethics and Information Technology 8 (1):17-27.score: 423.0
    This paper discusses privacy and the monitoring of e-mail in the context of the international nature of the modern world. Its three main aims are: (1) to highlight the problems involved in discussing an essentially philosophical question within a legal framework, and thus to show that providing purely legal answers to an ethical question is an inadequate approach to the problem of privacy on the Internet; (2) to discuss and define what privacy in the medium of the Internet actually is; (...)
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  8. J. Burr & P. Reynolds (2008). Thinking Ethically About Genetic Inheritance: Liberal Rights, Communitarianism and the Right to Privacy for Parents of Donor Insemination Children. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):281-284.score: 414.0
  9. Robert Holley (2006). The Ethics of Scholarly Research and the Internet: Issues of Publication, Privacy, and the Right to Speak. Journal of Information Ethics 15 (1):27-34.score: 414.0
  10. David J. Seipp (1983). English Judicial Recognition of a Right to Privacy. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 3 (3):325-370.score: 414.0
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  11. Varvara Z. Mitliaga (2004). Online Privacy: Explaining the Nature and Special Features of the Right to Seek Protection. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 2 (3):159-167.score: 414.0
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  12. Kiyoshi Murata & Yohko Orito (2008). Rethinking the Concept of the Right to Information Privacy: A Japanese Perspective. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 6 (3):233-245.score: 414.0
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  13. Francesca Bignami (2009). Constitutional Patriotism and the Right to Privacy : A Comparison of the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights. In Thérèse Murphy (ed.), New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 408.0
  14. Alexander Rosenberg (2000). Privacy as a Matter of Taste and Right. Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (02):68-.score: 405.0
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  15. Robert B. Hallborg (1986). Principles of Liberty and the Right to Privacy. Law and Philosophy 5 (2):175 - 218.score: 405.0
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  16. Anthony Bendall (2009). A Short History of the 'Right to Privacy'. Agora 44 (1):37.score: 405.0
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  17. Clifford G. Christians (2010). In Nearly Every Survey of Public Opinion and the Media, Privacy is a Premiere Issue If the Press Wishes to Main its Credibility. The Laws Safeguarding Privacy Are Impressive, but Legal Prescriptions Are an Inadequate Foundation for the News Business. Privacy is Not a Legal Right Only but a Moral Good. For All of the Sophistication of Case Law and Tort Law in Protecting Privacy, Legal Definitions Do Not Match Today's Challenges. Merely Following the Letter of the Law Presumes the Law Can Be Determined ... [REVIEW] In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. 203.score: 405.0
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  18. J. Angelo Corlett (2002). The Nature and Value of the Moral Right to Privacy. Public Affairs Quarterly 16 (4):329-350.score: 405.0
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  19. Caroline Danielson (forthcoming). The Gender of Privacy and the Embodied Self: Examining the Origins of the Right to Privacy in US Law. Feminist Studies.score: 405.0
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  20. Willis H. Ware (1977). Impact of Telecommunications Technology on the Right to Privacy. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 8 (4):2-5.score: 405.0
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  21. K. Lützén (2003). The Right to Privacy of E-Mails Raises Many Questions. Nursing Ethics 10 (1):2-3.score: 405.0
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  22. Ferdinand David Schoeman (ed.) (1984). Philosophical Dimensions of Privacy: An Anthology. Cambridge University Press.score: 396.0
    The aim of compiling the various essays presented here is to make readily accessible many of the most significant and influential discussions of privacy to be found in the literature. In addition to being representative of the diversity of attitudes toward privacy, this collection has a coherence that results from the authors' focus on the same issues and theories. The main issue addressed in this book is the moral significance of privacy. Some social science and legal treatments are included because (...)
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  23. Jesper Ryberg (2007). Privacy Rights, Crime Prevention, CCTV, and the Life of Mrs Aremac. Res Publica 13 (2):127-143.score: 386.0
    Over the past decade the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) as a means of crime prevention has reached unprecedented levels. Though critics of this development do not speak with one voice and have pointed to a number of different problems in the use of CCTV, one argument has played a dominant role in the debate, namely, that CCTV constitutes an unacceptable violation of people’s right to privacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine this argument critically. It (...)
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  24. Diane P. Michelfelder (2001). The Moral Value of Informational Privacy in Cyberspace. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):129-135.score: 367.0
    Solutions to the problem ofprotecting informational privacy in cyberspacetend to fall into one of three categories:technological solutions, self-regulatorysolutions, and legislative solutions. In thispaper, I suggest that the legal protection ofthe right to online privacy within the USshould be strengthened. Traditionally, inidentifying where support can be found in theUS Constitution for a right to informationalprivacy, the point of focus has been on theFourth Amendment; protection in this contextfinds its moral basis in personal liberty,personal dignity, self-esteem, and othervalues. On the (...)
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  25. Bo Brinkman (2013). An Analysis of Student Privacy Rights in the Use of Plagiarism Detection Systems. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1255-1266.score: 366.0
    Plagiarism detection services are a powerful tool to help encourage academic integrity. Adoption of these services has proven to be controversial due to ethical concerns about students’ rights. Central to these concerns is the fact that most such systems make permanent archives of student work to be re-used in plagiarism detection. This computerization and automation of plagiarism detection is changing the relationships of trust and responsibility between students, educators, educational institutions, and private corporations. Educators must respect student privacy rights when (...)
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  26. Carol J. Gill (2004). Depression in the Context of Disability and the “Right to Die”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (3):171-198.score: 333.0
    Arguments in favor of legalized assisted suicide often center on issues of personal privacy and freedom of choice over one's body. Many disability advocates assert, however, that autonomy arguments neglect the complex sociopolitical determinants of despair for people with disabilities. Specifically, they argue that social approval of suicide for individuals with irreversible conditions is discriminatory and that relaxing restrictions on assisted suicide would jeopardize, not advance, the freedom of persons with disabilities to direct the lives they choose. This paper examines (...)
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  27. G. T. Laurie (2002). Genetic Privacy: A Challenge to Medico-Legal Norms. Cambridge University Press.score: 306.0
    The phenomenon of the New Genetics raises complex social problems, particularly those of privacy. This book offers ethical and legal perspectives on the questions of a right to know and not to know genetic information from the standpoint of individuals, their relatives, employers, insurers and the state. Graeme Laurie provides a unique definition of privacy, including a concept of property rights in the person, and argues for stronger legal protection of privacy in the shadow of developments in human genetics. (...)
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  28. George E. Panichas (2014). An Intrusion Theory of Privacy. Res Publica 20 (2):145-161.score: 303.0
    This paper offers a general theory of privacy, a theory that takes privacy to consist in being free from certain kinds of intrusions. On this understanding, privacy interests are distinct and distinguishable from those in solitude, anonymity, and property, for example, or from the fact that others possess, with neither consent nor permission, personal information about oneself. Privacy intrusions have both epistemic and psychological components, and can range in value from relatively trivial considerations to those of profound consequence for an (...)
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  29. Annabelle Lever, Feminism, Democracy and the Right to Privacy.score: 299.0
    This article argues that people have legitimate interests in privacy that deserve legal protection on democratic principles. It describes the right to privacy as a bundle of rights of personal choice, association and expression and shows that, so described, people have legitimate political interests in privacy. These interests reflect the ways that privacy rights can supplement the protection for people’s freedom and equality provided by rights of political choice, association and expression, and can help to make sure that these (...)
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  30. Claudia Wiesemann (2011). Is There a Right Not to Know One's Sex? The Ethics of 'Gender Verification' in Women's Sports Competitions. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):216-220.score: 294.0
    The paper discusses the current medical practice of "gender verification" in sports from an ethical point of view. It takes the recent public discussion about 800-meter runner Caster Semenya as a starting point. At the World Championships in Athletics 2009 in Berlin, Germany, Semenya was challenged by competitors as being a so called "sex impostor". A medical examination to verify her sex ensued. The author analyses whether athletes like Semenya could claim a right not to know that is generally (...)
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  31. Edita Gruodytė (2012). Legal Aspects of Regulation of Abortion in the Context of Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (2):739-752.score: 288.0
    Regulatory approach to the right to abortion in Europe is diverse and basically related to the issue of when the right to life begins and how this question is reflected in national legislation. Such an approach and diversity is tolerated by the European Court of Human Rights, but only if some specific standards and criteria formulated in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights are reflected in national legislation. Research of the Lithuanian legal acts conducted in (...)
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  32. Lars Øystein Ursin (2008). Biobank Research and the Right to Privacy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (4):267-285.score: 285.0
    What is privacy? What does privacy mean in relation to biobanking, in what way do the participants have an interest in privacy, (why) is there a right to privacy, and how should the privacy issue be regulated when it comes to biobank research? A relational view of privacy is argued for in this article, which takes as its basis a general discussion of several concepts of privacy and attempts at grounding privacy rights. In promoting and protecting the rights that (...)
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  33. Janice Richardson (2011). The Changing Meaning of Privacy, Identity and Contemporary Feminist Philosophy. Minds and Machines 21 (4):517-532.score: 279.0
    This paper draws upon contemporary feminist philosophy in order to consider the changing meaning of privacy and its relationship to identity, both online and offline. For example, privacy is now viewed by European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) as a right, which when breached can harm us by undermining our ability to maintain social relations. I briefly outline the meaning of privacy in common law and under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in order to show the relevance (...)
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  34. Ludvig Beckman (2005). Democracy and Genetic Privacy: The Value of Bodily Integrity. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):97-103.score: 279.0
    The right to genetic privacy is presently being incorporated in legal systems all over the world. It remains largely unclear however what interests and values this right serves to protect. There are many different arguments made in the literature, yet none takes into account the problem of how particular values can be justified given the plurality of moral and religious doctrines in our societies. In this article theories of public reason are used in order to explore how genetic (...)
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  35. Alan L. Lockwood (1977). Values Education and the Right to Privacy. Journal of Moral Education 7 (1):9-26.score: 277.0
    Abstract Values education is occasionally attacked as violative of the privacy rights of students and others. Stipulating a definition of the right to privacy, the author develops some general reasons for protecting the right to privacy. General criteria for judging the extent to which values education curricula violate privacy are established and applied to two approaches to values education. One conclusion is that not all approaches to values education should be seen as violative of privacy rights.
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  36. James J. Cappel (1995). A Study of Individuals' Ethical Beliefs and Perceptions of Electronic Mail Privacy. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):819 - 827.score: 276.0
    While electronic mail has enjoyed rapid growth in the workplace, many companies have failed to establish clear expectations among employees about their e-mail privacy rights. This has resulted in controversy and even lawsuits against employers where employees later learned that management personnel monitored or read their electronic communications. It has been speculated that most employees underestimate the legal right of their employer to engage in e-mail monitoring activities. However, this issue has been virtually unexplored from a research perspective. Consequently, (...)
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  37. Laura Lally (1996). Privacy Versus Accessibility: The Impact of Situationally Conditioned Belief. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (11):1221 - 1226.score: 276.0
    The information age we are living in and the technology that supports it, raises new ethical concerns. Among these concerns are privacy — the rights of individuals to withold information they consider sensitive, and accessibility — the rights of individuals to obtain information that is relevant to the decisions they must make. Arguments about potential impacts of information technology on privacy and accessibility mask and underlying conflict — that one person's beliefs about their right to relevant information is likely (...)
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  38. Jay Black (1994). Privacy in America: The Frontier of Duty and Restraint. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (4):213 – 234.score: 272.0
    Topics at a Poynter Institute privacy conference in December 1992 ranged from the role and obligations of the journalist to the rights of victims. Journalists' responsibility to fulfill a dual role of truthtelling and minimizing harm to vulnerable people in society framed the discussion. The public' s curiosity and media obsessions with information about victims of sex crimes are the first topics to be explored. Bob Steele of the Poynter Institute sets the stage for the delicate balance. Helen Benedict, author (...)
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  39. Edmund Wall (2011). Privacy and the Moral Right to Personal Autonomy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):69-85.score: 270.0
    I argue that the moral right to privacy is the moral right to consent to access by others to one’s personal information. Although this thesis is relatively simple and already implicit in considerations about privacy, it has, nevertheless, been overlooked by philosophers. In the paper, I present and defend my account of the moral right to privacy, respond to possible objections to it, and attempt to show its advantages over two recent accounts: one by Steve Matthews and (...)
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  40. J. V. McHale & J. Jones (2012). Privacy, Confidentiality and Abortion Statistics: A Question of Public Interest? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):31-34.score: 270.0
    Next SectionThe precise nature and scope of healthcare confidentiality has long been the subject of debate. While the obligation of confidentiality is integral to professional ethical codes and is also safeguarded under English law through the equitable remedy of breach of confidence, underpinned by the right to privacy enshrined in Article 8 of the Human Rights Act 1998, it has never been regarded as absolute. But when can and should personal information be made available for statistical and research purposes (...)
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  41. Benjamin J. Goold (2002). Privacy Rights and Public Spaces: CCTV and the Problem of the “Unobservable Observer”. Criminal Justice Ethics 21 (1):21-27.score: 270.0
    (2002). Privacy rights and public spaces: CCTV and the problem of the “unobservable observer”. Criminal Justice Ethics: Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 21-27. doi: 10.1080/0731129X.2002.9992113.
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  42. Judith Andre (1986). Privacy as a Value and as a Right. Journal of Value Inquiry 20 (4):309-317.score: 270.0
    Knowledge of others, then, has value; so does immunity from being known. The ability to extend one's knowledge has value; so does the ability to limit other's knowledge of oneself. I have claimed that no interest can count as a right unless it clearly outweighs opposing interests whose presence is logically entailed. I see no way to establish that my interest in not being known, simply as such, outweighs your desire to know about me. I acknowledge the intuitive attractiveness (...)
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  43. Deborah L. Kidder & William P. Smith (2011). Slave to Facebook? How Technology is Changing the Balance Between Right to Privacy and Right to Know. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:52-61.score: 270.0
    Have social media sites like Facebook become such a significant part of our social fabric that people face negative consequences for not joining and sharing? What role does a right to privacy play in circumstances where self-disclosure is the norm? We surveyed students about teammate preferences for team members based on information availability and Facebook membership. Students report a strong preference for teammates for whom there is information and Facebook participation.
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  44. Robert Streiffer, Alan P. Rubel & Julie R. Fagan (2006). Medical Privacy and the Public's Right to Vote: What Presidential Candidates Should Disclose. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4):417 – 439.score: 270.0
    We argue that while presidential candidates have the right to medical privacy, the public nature and importance of the presidency generates a moral requirement that candidates waive those rights in certain circumstances. Specifically, candidates are required to disclose information about medical conditions that are likely to seriously undermine their ability to fulfill what we call the "core functions" of the office of the presidency. This requirement exists because (1) people have the right to be governed only with their (...)
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  45. Samuel C. Rickless (2007). The Right to Privacy Unveiled. San Diego Law Review 44 (1):773-799.score: 267.0
    The vast majority of philosophers and legal theorists who have thought about the issue agree that there is such a thing as a moral right to privacy. However, there is little or no theoretical consensus about the nature of this right. According to reductionists, the right to privacy amounts to nothing more than a cluster of property rights and rights over the person, and therefore plays no autonomous explanatory role in moral theory (Thomson 1975, Davis 1959). Among (...)
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  46. Dan L. Burk (2008). Information Ethics and the Law of Data Representations. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):135-147.score: 267.0
    The theories of information ethics articulated by Luciano Floridi and his collaborators have clear implications for law. Information law, including the law of privacy and of intellectual property, is especially likely to benefit from a coherent and comprehensive theory of information ethics. This article illustrates how information ethics might apply to legal doctrine, by examining legal questions related to the ownership and control of the personal data representations, including photographs, game avatars, and consumer profiles, that have become ubiquitous with the (...)
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  47. Michael R. Curry (1997). Digital People, Digital Places: Rethinking Privacy in a World of Geographic Information. Ethics and Behavior 7 (3):253 – 263.score: 267.0
    With respect to the right of privacy, some of the most difficult concerns arise from the map, and especially the modern, computer-generated map. Maps support a view in which the local--and the private--are unimportant, as they represent the world in ways that make places seem fundamentally alike. By geocoding he location of people, places, and events, maps offer a universal set of identifiers, one much more difficult to regulate than traditional identifiers like the social security number. At the same (...)
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  48. Anita Allen, Natural Law, Slavery, and the Right to Privacy Tort.score: 267.0
    In 1905 the Supreme Court of Georgia became the first state high court to recognize a freestanding “right to privacy” tort in the common law. The landmark case was Pavesich v. New England Life Insurance Co. Must it be a cause for deep jurisprudential concern that the common law right to privacy in wide currency today originated in Pavesich’s explicit judicial interpretation of the requirements of natural law? Must it be an additional worry that the court which originated (...)
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  49. Kenneth Einar Himma, Privacy Vs. Security: Why Privacy is Not an Absolute Value or Right.score: 263.0
    In this essay, I consider the relationship between the rights to privacy and security and argue that, in a sense to be made somewhat more precise below, that threats to the right to security outweighs comparable threats to privacy. My argument begins with an assessment of ordinary case judgments and an explanation of the important moral distinction between intrinsic value (i.e., value as an end) and instrumental value (i.e., value as a means), arguing that each approach assigns more moral (...)
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  50. Steven Davis (2009). Is There a Right to Privacy? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (4):450-475.score: 261.0
    It is widely held that there is a legal right to privacy that plays such a central role in a number of important US Supreme Court decisions. There is however a great deal of dispute about whether there is a moral right to privacy and if there is, what grounds the right. Before this can be determined, we must be clear about the nature of privacy, something that is not clearly understood and that, as we shall see, (...)
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