Search results for 'eleatic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark Colyvan (1998). Can the Eleatic Principle Be Justified? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):313 - 335.score: 12.0
    The Eleatic Principle or causal criterion is a causal test that entities must pass in order to gain admission to some philosophers’ ontology.1 This principle justifies belief in only those entities to which causal power can be attributed, that is, to those entities which can bring about changes in the world. The idea of such a test is rather important in modern ontology, since it is neither without intuitive appeal nor without influential supporters. Its supporters have included David Armstrong (...)
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  2. Michael Rea (2001). How to Be an Eleatic Monist. Noûs 35 (s15):129-151.score: 12.0
    There is a tradition according to which Parmenides of Elea endorsed the following set of counterintuitive doctrines: (a) There exists exactly one material thing. (b) What exists does not change. (g) Nothing is generated or destroyed. (d) What exists is undivided. For convenience, I will use the label ‘Eleatic monism’ to refer to the conjunction of a–d.
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  3. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2011). Why Spinoza is Not an Eleatic Monist (Or Why Diversity Exists). In Philip Goff (ed.), Spinoza on Monism. Palgrave.score: 9.0
    “Why did God create the World?” is one of the traditional questions of theology. In the twentieth century this question was rephrased in a secularized manner as “Why is there something rather than nothing?” While creation - at least in its traditional, temporal, sense - has little place in Spinoza’s system, a variant of the same questions puts Spinoza’s system under significant pressure. According to Spinoza, God, or the substance, has infinitely many modes. This infinity of modes follow from the (...)
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  4. Montgomery Furth (1968). Elements of Eleatic Ontology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 6 (2).score: 9.0
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  5. Graham Oddie (1982). Armstrong on the Eleatic Principle and Abstract Entities. Philosophical Studies 41 (2):285 - 295.score: 9.0
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  6. Josh Parsons (2004). The Eleatic Hangover Cure. Analysis 64 (4):364–366.score: 9.0
    It’s well known that one way to cure a hangover is by a “hair of the dog” — another alcoholic drink. The drawback of this method is that, so it would appear, it cannot be used to completely cure a hangover, since the cure simply induces a further hangover at a later time, which must in turn either be cured or suffered through.
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  7. G. E. L. Owen (1960). Eleatic Questions. Classical Quarterly 10 (1-2):84-.score: 9.0
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  8. Thomas M. Lennon (2007). The Eleatic Descartes. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):29-45.score: 9.0
    : Given Descartes's conception of extension, space and body, there are deep problems about how there can be any real motion. The argument here is that in fact Descartes takes motion to be only phenomenal. The paper sets out the problems generated by taking motion to be real, the solution to them found in the Cartesian texts, and an explanation of those texts in which Descartes appears on the contrary to regard motion as real.
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  9. Jonathan Barnes (1979). Parmenides and the Eleatic One. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 61 (1):1-21.score: 9.0
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  10. Kenneth Neil M. Dorter, Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues.score: 9.0
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  11. Eric C. Sanday (2009). Eleatic Metaphysics in Plato's Parmenides : Zeno's Puzzle of Plurality. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (3):pp. 208-226.score: 9.0
  12. Simon Prosser (2006). The Eleatic Non-Stick Frying Pan. Analysis 66 (291):187–194.score: 9.0
    A novel way of making a non-stick frying pan using a topologically open surface is described. While the article has a slight humorous element to it, it is also intended to contain some serious philosophical points concerning the nature of infinitely divisible matter and the kind of contact that must occur between objects in order for them to interact.
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  13. Gustavo E. Romero (2013). From Change to Spacetime: An Eleatic Journey. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (1):139-148.score: 9.0
    I present a formal ontological theory where the basic building blocks of the world can be either things or events. In any case, the result is a Parmenidean worldview where change is not a global property. What we understand by change manifests as asymmetries in the pattern of the world-lines that constitute 4-dimensional existents. I maintain that such a view is in accord with current scientific knowledge.
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  14. Patricia Kenig Curd (1993). Eleatic Monism in Zeno and Melissus. Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):1-22.score: 9.0
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  15. Scott Berman (1996). Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues. Ancient Philosophy 16 (2):487-491.score: 9.0
  16. Laura Grams (2012). The Eleatic Visitor's Method of Division. Apeiron 45 (2):130-156.score: 9.0
  17. V. Tejera (1978). Plato's Politicus, an Eleatic Sophist on Politics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (1):106-125.score: 9.0
  18. R. B. B. Wardy (1988). Eleatic Pluralism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 70 (2):125-146.score: 9.0
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  19. V. Tejera (1978). Plato's Politicus: An Eleatic Sophist on Politics (Part II). Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (2):106-125.score: 9.0
  20. G. B. Kerferd (1961). Eleatic Philosophy J. H. M. M. Loenen: Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias. A Reinterpretation of Eleatic Philosophy. Pp. 207. Assen: Van Gorcum, 1959. Paper, Fl. 14.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (01):26-27.score: 9.0
  21. M. Schofield (1998). The Legacy of Parmenides. Eleatic Monism and Later Presocratic Thought. P Curd. The Classical Review 48 (2):347-348.score: 9.0
  22. Jacob Howland (1996). Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues. Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):646-648.score: 9.0
  23. Wallace Matson (1984). Eleatic Motions. Philosophical Inquiry 6 (3-4):184-201.score: 9.0
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  24. Mitchell H. Miller (1999). The Legacy of Parmenides, Eleatic Monism and Later Presocratic Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):157-159.score: 9.0
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  25. Samuel C. Wheeler (1983). Megarian Paradoxes as Eleatic Arguments. American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (3):287-295.score: 9.0
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  26. Luis Andres Bredlow (2011). Plato and Invention of the Eleatic School (Sof. 242 D). Convivium 24:25-42.score: 9.0
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  27. R. S. B. (1960). Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias. A Reinterpretation of Eleatic Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 14 (1):173-174.score: 9.0
  28. P. Curd (1998). Eleatic Arguments. In Jyl Gentzler (ed.), Method in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 1--28.score: 9.0
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  29. Adam Drozdek (forthcoming). Eleatic Being: Finite or Infinite? Hermes.score: 9.0
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  30. Denis Grey & J. H. M. M. Loenen (1961). Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias: A Reinterpretation of Eleatic Philosophy. Journal of Hellenic Studies 81:184.score: 9.0
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  31. Jacob Howland (1993). The Eleatic Stranger's Socratic Condemnation of Socrates. Polis 12:15-36.score: 9.0
     
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  32. Samuel C. Wheeler Iii (1983). Megarian Paradoxes as Eleatic Arguments. American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (3):287 - 295.score: 9.0
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  33. Donna Jones (2008). The Eleatic Bergson. Diacritics 37 (1):21-31.score: 9.0
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  34. M. C. Scholar (1965). Parmenides, Melissus and Gorgias. A Reinterpretation of Eleatic Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 3 (2):255-260.score: 9.0
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  35. David Sedley (2008). Atomism's Eleatic Roots. In Patricia Curd & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
     
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  36. H. Tarrant (2000). The Legacy of Parmenides: Eleatic Monism and Later Presocratic Thought. By Patricia Curd. The European Legacy 5 (2):322-322.score: 9.0
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  37. Bradley Dowden, Zeno’s Paradoxes. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 6.0
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  38. Author unknown, Parmenides. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 6.0
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  39. Michael Patzia, Xenophanes. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 6.0
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  40. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2010). Acosmism or Weak Individuals?: Hegel, Spinoza, and the Reality of the Finite. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 77-92.score: 5.0
    Like many of his contemporaries, Hegel considered Spinoza a modern reviver of ancient Eleatic monism, in whose system “all determinate content is swallowed up as radically null and void”. This characterization of Spinoza as denying the reality of the world of finite things had a lasting influence on the perception of Spinoza in the two centuries that followed. In this article, I take these claims of Hegel to task and evaluate their validity. Although Hegel’s official argument for the unreality (...)
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  41. J. E. Raven (1948). Pythagoreans and Eleatics. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.score: 5.0
  42. Mark Jago & Stephen Barker (2012). Being Positive About Negative Facts. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):117-138.score: 3.0
    Negative facts get a bad press. One reason for this is that it is not clear what negative facts are. We provide a theory of negative facts on which they are no stranger than positive atomic facts. We show that none of the usual arguments hold water against this account. Negative facts exist in the usual sense of existence and conform to an acceptable Eleatic principle. Furthermore, there are good reasons to want them around, including their roles in causation, (...)
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  43. Sam Cowling (2014). No Simples, No Gunk, No Nothing. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 95 (1):246-260.score: 3.0
    Mereological realism holds that the world has a mereological structure – i.e. a distribution of mereological properties and relations. In this article, I defend Eleaticism about properties, according to which there are no causally inert non-logical properties. I then present an Eleatic argument for mereological anti-realism, which denies the existence of both mereological composites and mereological simples. After defending Eleaticism and mereological anti-realism, I argue that mereological anti-realism is preferable to mereological nihilism. I then conclude by examining the thesis (...)
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  44. Paul Benacerraf (1962). Tasks, Super-Tasks, and the Modern Eleatics. Journal of Philosophy 59 (24):765-784.score: 3.0
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  45. Ryan Wasserman (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Problem of Change. Philosophy Compass 5 (3):283-286.score: 3.0
    Our world is a world of change. Children are born and grow into adults. Material possessions rust and decay with age and ultimately perish. Yet scepticism about change is as old as philosophy itself. Heraclitus, for example, argued that nothing could survive the replacement of parts, so that it is impossible to step into the same river twice. Zeno argued that motion is paradoxical, so that nothing can alter its location. Parmenides and his followers went even further, arguing that the (...)
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  46. Ryan Wasserman (2006). The Problem of Change. Philosophy Compass 1 (1):48–57.score: 3.0
    Our world is a world of change. Children are born and grow into adults. Material possessions rust and decay with age and ultimately perish. Yet scepticism about change is as old as philosophy itself. Heraclitus, for example, argued that nothing could survive the replacement of parts, so that it is impossible to step into the same river twice. Zeno argued that motion is paradoxical, so that nothing can alter its location. Parmenides and his followers went even further, arguing that the (...)
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  47. Charles Kahn (2007). Why Is the Sophist a Sequel to the Theaetetus? Phronesis 52 (1):33-57.score: 3.0
    The "Theaetetus" and the "Sophist" both stand in the shadow of the "Parmenides," to which they refer. I propose to interpret these two dialogues as Plato's first move in the project of reshaping his metaphysics with the double aim of avoiding problems raised in the "Parmenides" and applying his general theory to the philosophy of nature. The classical doctrine of Forms is subject to revision, but Plato's fundamental metaphysics is preserved in the "Philebus" as well as in the "Timaeus." The (...)
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  48. George Harvey (2009). Technê and the Good in Plato's Statesman and Philebus. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 1-33.score: 3.0
    My paper addresses a number of questions raised in the Statesman by the Eleatic Visitor’s identification of certain ontological conditions for the existence of art of due measure, and therefore of all the technai . My view is that evidence relevant to these questions can be found in the Philebus , and specifically, in an ontological doctrine presented at 23c–27c. What emerges from an examination of the Statesman and Philebus is a highly developed conception of technê , one that (...)
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  49. Andrew Newman, The Bundle Theory, the Principle of Unity for Elementary Particulars, and Some Issues.score: 3.0
    1 See for example, E. J. Lowe, The Possibility of Metaphysics, pp. 51-3, 210-220, and David Lewis, The Plurality of Worlds on the notion of concrete object. 2 The properties that are constituents of a particular should be intrinsic properties, though it need not be assumed that all its intrinsic properties are constituents. The notion of intrinsic property is easier if a sparse view (as opposed to an abundant view) of properties is assumed. A sparse view requires a criterion for (...)
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  50. Alexander Nehamas (1979). Self-Predication and Plato's Theory of Forms. American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (2):93 - 103.score: 3.0
    This paper offers an interpretation of self-Predication (the idea that justice is just) in plato, Given that self-Predication is accepted as obvious both by plato and by his audience, Which entails that "all" self-Predications are clearly, Though not trivially, True. More strongly, It is suggested that "only" self-Predications can be accepted as clearly true by plato. This is to deny that plato had at his disposal an articulated notion of predication, And his middle theory of forms, Primarily the relation of (...)
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