Results for 'Comic, The'

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  1.  18
    The Comic, the Tragic, and the Cynical: Some Notes on Their Ethical Dimensions.Israel Knox - 1951 - Ethics 62 (3):210-214.
  2. Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor.John Morreall - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Philosophy of Humor develops an inclusive theory that integrates psychological, aesthetic, and ethical issues relating to humor Offers an enlightening and accessible foray into the serious business of humor Reveals how standard theories of humor fail to explain its true nature and actually support traditional prejudices against humor as being antisocial, irrational, and foolish Argues that humor’s benefits overlap significantly with those of philosophy Includes a foreword by Robert Mankoff, Cartoon Editor of The New Yorker.
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  3.  47
    Moderate Comic Immoralism and the Genetic Approach to the Ethical Criticism of Art.Ted Nannicelli - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):169-179.
    According to comic moralism, moral flaws make comic works less funny or not funny at all. In contrast, comic immoralism is the view that moral flaws make comic works funnier. In this article, I argue for a moderate version of comic immoralism. I claim that, sometimes, comic works are funny partly in virtue of their moral flaws. I argue for this claim—and artistic immoralism more generally—by identifying artistically valuable moral flaws in relevant actions undertaken in the creation of those works. (...)
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  4. The Immortal Comedy: The Comic Phenomenon in Art, Literature, and Life.Agnes Heller - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    This book is the first attempt to think philosophically about the comic phenomenon in literature, art, and life. Working across a substantial collection of comic works author Agnes Heller makes seminal observations on the comic in the work of both classical and contemporary figures. Whether she's discussing Shakespeare, Kafka, Rabelais, or the paintings of Brueghel and Daumier Heller's Immortal Comedy makes a characteristic contribution to modern thought across the humanities.
     
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  5.  60
    Comic Immoralism and Relatively Funny Jokes.Scott Woodcock - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (2):203-216.
    A widely accepted view in the philosophy of humour is that immoral jokes, like racist, sexist or homophobic jokes, can nevertheless be funny. What remains controversial is whether the moral flaws in these jokes can sometimes increase their humour. Moderate comic immoralism claims that it is possible, in at least some cases, for moral flaws to increase the humour of jokes. Critics of moderate comic immoralism deny that this ever occurs. They recognise that some jokes are both funny and immoral, (...)
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  6. The Salacious and the Satirical: In Defense of Symmetric Comic Moralism. Smuts - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):45-62.
    A common view holds that humor and morality are antithetical: Moral flaws enhance amusement, and moral virtues detract. I reject both of these claims. If we distinguish between merely outrageous jokes and immoral jokes, the problems with the common view become apparent. What we find is that genuine morals flaws tend to inhibit amusement. Further, by looking at satire, we can see that moral virtues sometimes enhance amusement. The position I defend is called symmetric comic moralism. It is widely regarded (...)
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  7.  5
    A Total Write-Off. Aristophanes, Cratinus, and the Rhetoric of Comic Competition.I. Comic Intertextualities - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52:138-163.
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  8.  21
    Comic-Book Superheroes and Prosocial Agency: A Large-Scale Quantitative Analysis of the Effects of Cognitive Factors on Popular Representations.James Carney & Pádraig Mac Carron - 2017 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 17 (3-4):306-330.
    We argue that the counterfactual representations of popular culture, like their religious cognates, are shaped by cognitive constraints that become visible when considered in aggregate. In particular, we argue that comic-book literature embodies core intuitions about sociality and its maintenance that are activated by the cognitive problem of living in large groups. This leads to four predictions: comic-book enforcers should be punitively prosocial, be quasi-omniscient, exhibit kin-signalling proxies and be minimally counterintuitive. We gauge these predictions against a large sample of (...)
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  9.  50
    Two Comic Plot Structures.Noël Carroll - 2005 - The Monist 88 (1):154-183.
    A great deal of the humor that we encounter is narrative in form. This is obviously the case with many, if not most, jokes. But humor also occurs in more expanded narrative frameworks, including plays, novels, films, short stories, TV programs, comic books, and so forth. The purpose of this paper is to explore the question of whether there are any plot structures—of magnitudes greater than that of the joke—that might be thought of as comic in virtue of their narrative (...)
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  10.  65
    Comic Normativity and the Ethics of Humour.Philip Percival - 2005 - The Monist 88 (1):93-120.
    Comic moralism holds that some moral properties impact negatively on the funniness of certain items that possess them. Strong versions of the doctrine deem the impact to be devastating: the possession of such a property by one of these items ensures the item is not funny. Weak versions deem the impact merely damaging: any funniness one of the items possesses is diminished, but not destroyed, by its possession of the property. Various species of comic moralism hold, respectively, various moral properties (...)
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  11. Ethics and Comic Amusement.Noël Carroll - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):241-253.
    This article explores several views on the relation of humour, especially tendentious humour, to morality, including comic amoralism, comic ethicism, comic immoralism, and moderate comic moralism. The essay concludes by defending moderate comic moralism.
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  12.  37
    The Learned Monk as a Comic Figure: On Reading a Buddhist Vinaya as Indian Literature. [REVIEW]Gregory Schopen - 2007 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (3):201-226.
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  13. Laughter an Essay on the Meaning of the Comic.Henri Bergson, Cloudesley Shovell Henry Brereton & Fred Rothwell - 1999
     
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  14.  11
    The Comic Nature of Ecce Homo.Matthew Meyer - 2012 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (1):32-43.
  15.  12
    Irony in the Age of Empire: Comic Perspectives on Democracy and Freedom.Cynthia Willett - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    Comedy, from social ridicule to the unruly laughter of the carnival, provides effective tools for reinforcing social patterns of domination as well as weapons for emancipation. In Irony in the Age of Empire, Cynthia Willett asks: What could embody liberation better than laughter? Why do the oppressed laugh? What vision does the comic world prescribe? For Willett, the comic trumps standard liberal accounts of freedom by drawing attention to bodies, affects, and intimate relationships, topics which are usually neglected by political (...)
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  16. The Pleasures of the Comic and of Socratic Inquiry.Mitchell Miller - 2008 - Arethusa 41 (2):263-289.
    At Apology 33c Socrates explains that "some people enjoy … my company" because "they … enjoy hearing those questioned who think they are wise but are not." At Philebus 48a-50b he makes central to his account of the pleasure of laughing at comedy the exposé of the self-ignorance of those who presume themselves wise. Does the latter passage explain the pleasure of watching Socrates at work? I explore this by tracing the admixture of pain, the causes, and the "natural harmony" (...)
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  17.  80
    X-Men Ethics: Using Comic Books to Teach Business Ethics.Virginia W. Gerde & R. Spencer Foster - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):245-258.
    A modern form of narrative, comic books are used to communicate, discuss, and critique issues in business ethics and social issues in management. A description of comic books as a legitimate medium is followed by a discussion of the pedagogical uses of comic books and assessment techniques. The strengths of the pedagogy include crossing cultural barriers, understanding the complexity of individual decision-making and organizational influences, and the universality of dilemmas and values. We provide an initial source for educators on the (...)
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  18.  7
    Sophocles the Kōmōidoumenos: Two Forgotten Comic Fragments.Sebastiana Nervegna - 2016 - Classical Quarterly 66 (1):32-45.
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  19. Comic Racism and Violence.Michael Billig - 2005 - In Sharon Lockyer & Michael Pickering (eds.), Beyond a Joke: The Limits of Humour. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 25--44.
     
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  20. Comic Relief for Anankastic Conditionals.Tim Fernando - manuscript
    Anankastic conditionals are analyzed in terms of events conceived as sequences of snapshots – roughly, comics. Quantification is applied not to worlds (sets of which are customarily identified with propositions) but to strings that record observations of actions. The account generalizes to other types of conditionals, sidestepping certain well-known problems that beset possible worlds treatments, such as logical omniscience and irrelevance. A refinement for anankastic conditionals is considered, incorporating action relations.
     
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  21.  62
    Mill in Parliament: The View From the Comic Papers: John M. Robson.John M. Robson - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (1):102-143.
    So, on 22 July 1865, under the title ‘Philosophy and Punch’, did England's premier comic weekly greet the election of J. S. Mill as MP for Westminster. Mill held his seat for only one term, until the general election of 1868, when his Whig-Liberal colleague Robert Wellesley Grosvenor was re-elected, but Mill was replaced by the loser in 1865, the Conservative W. H. Smith, Jr., who, though he never went to sea, became the ruler of the Queen's navy. The reasons (...)
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  22.  7
    Health Education and the Control of Urogenital Schistosomiasis: Assessing the Impact of the Juma Na Kichocho Comic-Strip Medical Booklet in Zanzibar.J. R. Stothard, A. N. Khamis, I. S. Khamis, C. H. E. Neo, I. Wei & D. Rollinson - 2016 - Journal of Biosocial Science 48 (S1):S40-S55.
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  23.  19
    Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic.Richard Smith - 1913 - International Journal of Ethics 23 (2):216-218.
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  24.  29
    The Ancient Zen Master as Clown-Figure and Comic Midwife.M. Conrad Hyers - 1970 - Philosophy East and West 20 (1):3-18.
  25. Comic Laughter.Marie Taylor Swabey - 1961 - Archon Books.
     
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  26. The Development of Comic Theory in Germany During the Eighteenth Century.Paul Mallory Haberland - 1971 - Göppingen, A. Kümmerle.
     
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  27. The Absolute Comic.Edith Kern - 1980 - Columbia University Press.
     
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  28.  6
    Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic.H. M. Kallen - 1912 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 9 (11):303-305.
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  29.  4
    The Philosophic Significance of the ComicZen and the Comic Spirit.Karen J. Lee & Conrad Hyers - 1976 - Philosophy East and West 26 (2):237.
  30.  8
    Aristophanes and the Comic Hero. [REVIEW]Nav V. Dunbar & C. H. Whitman - 1966 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 86:182-183.
  31. The Triumph of Wit: A Study of Victorian Comic Theory.Robert Bernard Martin - 1974 - Clarendon Press.
     
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  32.  5
    The Multimodal Construction of Acceptability: Marvel's Civil War Comic Books and the PATRIOT Act.Francisco Veloso & John Bateman - 2013 - Critical Discourse Studies 10 (4):427-443.
    The 9/11 attacks in the USA had profound political consequences at both domestic and international levels. Specific and controversial policy developments were pursued requiring substantial legitimation to find acceptance. A prime example was the USA PATRIOT Act, which was passed in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 and subsequently received considerable critique due to the sweeping nature of its redefinition of what was acceptable in the cause of ‘fighting terror’. The media, and their construal of events and policies, played a significant (...)
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  33. Self-Dissolving Seriousness: On the Comic in the Hegelian Conception of Tragedy.Rodolphe Gasché - 2000 - In Miguel de Beistegui & Simon Sparks (eds.), Philosophy and Tragedy. Routledge.
     
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  34.  6
    The Comic Poet Pherecrates, a War-Casualty of the Late 410s BC.S. Douglas Olson - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:49-50.
    The comic poet Pherecrates does not appear to have been active after the mid 410s. I suggest that he is to be identified with an epigraphically-attested war-casualty from a few years later.
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  35.  5
    The Concept of the Comic in Esthetics.T. B. Liubimova - 1980 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 19 (3):70-94.
    The comic is one of the principal esthetic categories; it unites the multifaceted experience of the social mind as it assimilates and cognizes the world, particularly the social world, on the basis of axioms of common sense, or even of public opinion about these axioms. Boldly violating the laws of logic and the verisimilitude of images, of normal connections and notions, and playing upon these violations, the comic nonetheless remains firmly on the side of common sense. The comic is inexhaustible (...)
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  36.  30
    The Comic Character of Confucius.Katrin Froese - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (4):295-312.
    This article examines the comic portrayal of Confucius in the Analects and the Zhuangzi, maintaining that there is a humorous aspect to the character of Confucius that is often overlooked. Conventional interpretations of the Analects downplay the pranks and mocking comments that are sprinkled throughout them. Many of the humorous words Confucius utters are directed at ritualistic behaviour which has become mechanistic, suggesting that in order to take ritual seriously, we must also be prepared to take it in jest. Furthermore, (...)
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  37.  3
    Comic Authority in Aristophanes’ Knights.John Lombardini - 2012 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 29 (1):130-149.
    This article investigates the relationship between comic speech and political authority in democratic Athens through a reading of Aristophanes’ Knights. The article surveys three different interpretations of how Aristophanes constructs the authority of his comic persona in the play: he contrasts comic speech with rhetorical speech to illustrate the superiority of the former ; he reflexively reveals to the audience the potential deceptiveness of comic speech ; and he mocks his own claims to authority through the construction of a comically (...)
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  38.  18
    Social Psychology and the Comic-Book Superhero: A Darwinian Approach.James Carney, Robin Dunbar, Anna Machin & Tamás Dávid-Barrett - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):195-215.
    One of the more compelling features of Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct is its theoretical parsimony. Utilizing what essentially amounts to one explanatory principle—that of Darwinian selection—Dutton advances a theory of aesthetics that is at once general enough to account for cross-cultural variations in artistic production and sufficiently nuanced to promote insights into individual artworks. In doing this, Dutton’s work could not offer a greater contrast to some of the more vocal trends in contemporary aesthetic theory, where ponderous theorizing and (...)
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  39.  36
    The Comic Vision of Life.John Morreall - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):125-140.
    Tragedy has traditionally been ranked higher than comedy, and critics often valorize the ‘tragic vision of life’. Using twenty contrasts between tragedy and comedy, I argue that there is a ‘comic vision of life’ which is superior to the tragic vision, especially in the post-heroic era in which we live.
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  40.  19
    Americanized Comic Braggarts.Walter Blair - 1977 - Critical Inquiry 4 (2):331-349.
    During nearly two centuries, American storytellers have celebrated comic figures, ebullient showoffs who turned up on one frontier after another—in the old South, in Kentucky and Tennessee, along the great inland rivers, in the mountains and the mines and on the prairies. Often, the stories went, when these characters engaged in a favorite pastime—playfully bragging about their strength, their skill and their exploits—they used animal metaphors such as Opossum, Screamer, Half-Horse Half-Alligator, the Big Bear of Arkansas or Gamecock of the (...)
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  41.  29
    Comic Relief: Nietzsche’s Gay Science.Robert Burch - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (1):174-176.
    In his “Translator’s Introduction” to The Gay Science, Walter Kaufmann writes: “This book … mirrors all of Nietzsche’s thought and could be related in a hundred ways to his other books, his notes and his letters. And yet it is complete in itself. For it is a work of art.” Judging by their actual treatment of The Gay Science, few commentators have taken this claim to artistic completeness seriously. Instead, the usual practice has been to abstract passages from the book, (...)
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  42.  15
    Comic Laughter. [REVIEW]D. C. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 17 (2):310-310.
    Explaining and classifying attitudes and art forms related to comic laughter, Swabey defends the kind of comic laughter which perceives the laughable as less than the perfect and true. Bad or false pretenders to "comedy" or humor, e.g., apparently all modern art reputed to be comic and playful, are rather bitterly scolded. The thesis might have been more credibly argued if more positive examples had been used.--C. D.
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  43. El cómic en España: 1977-2007.Pablo Vergara Díaz - 2009 - Aposta 42:3.
    This article aims to review the last three decades of the comic Spain. The study is evaluating the evolution of the comics industry, from its beginnings during the dictatorship and its expansion with the advent of democracy until the present times of difficulties and changes. The rise of the comic can be seen in its growing importance within the press, the acceptance of a public that matures over time and especially in the sales of an industry that has to adapt (...)
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  44.  45
    Comic and Tragic Interlocutors and Socratic Method.Janet McCracken - 1999 - Teaching Philosophy 22 (4):361-375.
    Teaching is often framed in terms of performance: an orator stands before a crowd, attempting to capture attention and to deliver material prepared in advance. This analogy falls apart, however, when one considers the extent to which teaching is a dialogical endeavor. Looking to the Meno, the Symposium, and the Republic, this paper offers an interpretation of these texts which deepens our understanding of Plato’s theory of education. First, a Platonic view of education recommends a view of educators not as (...)
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  45. The Comic Side of Gender Trouble and Bert Williams’ Signature Act.Michelle Ann Stephens - 2008 - Feminist Review 90 (1):128-146.
    Using the turn of the century blackface performer Bert Williams as a case study, this essay explores how we might think about black male performativity in the New World as a historical formation, one that extends both over the time of modernity and across the space of diaspora. I draw from contemporary theories of circum-atlantic performance and black feminist studies of the impact of slavery on black racial and gendered identities, to argue that performance affords a unique window into how (...)
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  46.  10
    Serious Comedy: The Philosophical and Theological Significance of Tragic and Comic Writing in the Western Tradition.Patrick Downey - 2000 - Lexington Books.
    Patrick Downey finds comedy at the heart of the Western philosophical and theological tradition. In Serious Comedy Downey tracks tragedy and comedy from the beginning of Western thought to the twentieth century, beginning with an in-depth examination of Aristotle and three Platonic dialogues: the Republic, the Phaedrus, and the Symposium. In the book's second section Downey argues that the Bible is at heart a comedic narrative and analyzes the philosophical and theological implications of this comedy. In the third section Downey (...)
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  47.  19
    Comic Theory in the Sixteenth Century. [REVIEW]W. Beare - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (3-4):232-233.
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  48.  29
    The Fragments of Athenian Comic Didascaliae Found in Rome. By W. A. Dittmer. One Vol. Pp. 54; Three Plates. Leiden: Brill, 1923. [REVIEW]A. W. Pickard-Cambridge - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (3-4):88-88.
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  49.  26
    The Birth Of Comedy Rusten The Birth of Comedy. Texts, Documents, and Art From Athenian Comic Competitions, 486–280. Translated by Jeffrey Henderson, David Konstan, Ralph Rosen, Jeffrey Rusten, and Niall W. Slater. Pp. Xxii + 794, Ills. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. Cased, £57, US$110. ISBN: 978-0-8018-9448-0. [REVIEW]Carl Shaw - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (2):376-378.
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  50. The Telling Face in Comic Strip and Graphic Novel.Ed S. Tan - 2001 - In Jan Baetens (ed.), The Graphic Novel. Leuven University Press. pp. 212.
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