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  1. added 2018-09-16
    Tragedies of Spirit: Tracing Finitude in Hegel's Phenomenology.Theodore D. George - 2006 - Albany, NY, USA: State University of New York Press.
    In Tragedies of Spirit, Theodore D. George engages Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit to explore the philosophical significance of tragedy in post-Kantian continental thought. George follows lines of inquiry originally developed by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Gadamer, and Derrida, and takes as his point of departure the concern that Hegel’s speculative philosophy forms a summit of modernity that the present historical time is called to interrogate. Yet, George argues that Hegel’s larger speculative ambitions in the Phenomenology compel him to turn to the resource (...)
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  2. added 2018-09-16
    Hegel's Speculative Theory of Political Life: Community and Tragedy in the "Phenomenology of Spirit".Theodore Dennis George - 2000 - Dissertation, Villanova University
    This dissertation provides a careful interpretation of Hegel's conception of political community in the Phenomenology of Spirit. It is often accepted by commentators that for Hegel in this text the highest achievements of community life are to be associated with the realization of 'absolute spirit' and 'the concept.' The author of this dissertation, however, develops a conception of political community based not upon this view, but instead upon a number of crucial, if somewhat oblique, passages within the Phenomenology dedicated to (...)
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  3. added 2017-08-11
    "And Why Not?" Hegel, Comedy, and the End of Art.Lydia L. Moland - 2016 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane (1-2):73-104.
    Towards the very end of his wide-ranging lectures on the philosophy of art, Hegel unexpectedly expresses a preference for comedy over tragedy. More surprisingly, given his systematic claims for his aesthetic theory, he suggests that this preference is arbitrary. This essay suggests that this arbitrariness is itself systematic, given Hegel’s broader claims about unity and necessity in art generally and his analysis of ancient as opposed to modern drama in particular. With the emergence of modern subjectivity, tragic plots lose their (...)
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  4. added 2015-04-20
    Review of Engel, The Problem of Tragedy. [REVIEW]D. C. B. - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):723-723.
  5. added 2014-03-28
    Beyond Tragedy: Tracing the Aristophanian Subtext of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.Karin de Boer - 2010 - In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  6. added 2014-03-07
    Hegel, Antigone, and First-Person Authority.Victoria I. Burke - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):373-380.
    Hegel thought Sophocles' Antigone was the finest tragedy, and he put drama atop his hierarchy of the arts, precisely at the point where his system transitions from aesthetics to the philosophy of religion. Hegel concluded his Aesthetics by writing, "Of all the masterpieces of the classical and modern world, the Antigone seems to me to be the most magnificent and satisfying work of art."1The Antigone owes its place in Hegel's hierarchy to its focus on Antigone's uncanny self-certainty. Positioned at the (...)
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  7. added 2013-09-20
    Tragedy, Recognition and the Death of God. [REVIEW]Paul Redding - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201307.
  8. added 2013-09-20
    Antigone’s Transgression: Hegel and Bataille on the Divine and the Human.Victoria I. Burke - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):535-.
    I maintain that Hegel’s reading of the Antigone underestimates the power of the negativity to which Antigone’s action is dedicated. I argue that the negativity of death and the sacred cannot, contrary to Hegel, to be sublated and thus incorporated into the progression of Spirit. Bataille’s treatment of the sacred better characterizes the unworldly force and the otherness with which Antigone and Creon are confronted when their actions bring the divine and the human into conflict. Antigone’s obedience to what she (...)
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