Results for 'Daniel S. Zisk'

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  1.  44
    Attitudes About Corporate Social Responsibility: Business Student Predictors.Robert W. Kolodinsky, Timothy M. Madden, Daniel S. Zisk & Eric T. Henkel - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):167-181.
    Four predictors were posited to affect business student attitudes about the social responsibilities of business, also known as corporate social responsibility (CSR). Applying Forsyth's (1980, "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology" 39, 175–184, 1992, "Journal of Business Ethics" 11, 461–470) personal moral philosophy model, we found that ethical idealism had a positive relationship with CSR attitudes, and ethical relativism a negative relationship. We also found materialism to be negatively related to CSR attitudes. Spirituality among business students did not significantly predict (...)
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  2.  47
    Deriving Collingwood's Metaethics: Absolute Presuppositions as Fundamental Principles of Morality.S. Daniel - 2016 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 22 (1):63-85.
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  3. The Problem of Identity of Objects in Hume's Philosophy.S. C. Daniel - 1985 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 12 (2):191.
  4.  13
    Some Observations on Meyer's Study of Reaction Time and Muscle Tension.Robert S. Daniel - 1949 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (6):896-898.
  5. Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2008 - In New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This view of mind, I (...)
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  6. Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - In Bertil Belfrage & Timo Airaksinen (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this is surprising, (...)
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  7. God Meets Satan’s Apple: The Paradox of Creation.Rubio Daniel - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (12):2987-3004.
    It is now the majority view amongst philosophers and theologians that any world could have been better. This places the choice of which world to create into an especially challenging class of decision problems: those that are discontinuous in the limit. I argue that combining some weak, plausible norms governing this type of problem with a creator who has the attributes of the god of classical theism results in a paradox: no world is possible. After exploring some ways out of (...)
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  8.  75
    Berkeley on God's Knowledge of Pain.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 136-145.
    Since nothing about God is passive, and the perception of pain is inherently passive, then it seems that God does not know what it is like to experience pain. Nor would he be able to cause us to experience pain, for his experience would then be a sensation (which would require God to have senses, which he does not). My suggestion is that Berkeley avoids this situation by describing how God knows about pain “among other things” (i.e. as something whose (...)
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  9. Berkeley's Pantheistic Discourse.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (3):179-194.
    Berkeley's immaterialism has more in common with views developed by Henry More, the mathematician Joseph Raphson, John Toland, and Jonathan Edwards than those of thinkers with whom he is commonly associated (e.g., Malebranche and Locke). The key for recognizing their similarities lies in appreciating how they understand St. Paul's remark that in God "we live and move and have our being" as an invitation to think to God as the space of discourse in which minds and ideas are identified. This (...)
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  10. Berkeley's Christian Neoplatonism, Archetypes, and Divine Ideas.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):239-258.
    Berkeley's doctrine of archetypes explains how God perceives and can have the same ideas as finite minds. His appeal of Christian neo-Platonism opens up a way to understand how the relation of mind, ideas, and their union is modeled on the Cappadocian church fathers' account of the persons of the trinity. This way of understanding Berkeley indicates why he, in contrast to Descartes or Locke, thinks that mind (spiritual substance) and ideas (the object of mind) cannot exist or be thought (...)
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  11. The Ramist Context of Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):487 – 505.
    Berkeley's doctrines about mind, the language of nature, substance, minima sensibilia, notions, abstract ideas, inference, and freedom appropriate principles developed by the 16th-century logician Peter Ramus and his 17th-century followers (e.g., Alexander Richardson, William Ames, John Milton). Even though Berkeley expresses himself in Cartesian or Lockean terms, he relies on a Ramist way of thinking that is not a form of mere rhetoric or pedagogy but a logic and ontology grounded in Stoicism. This article summarizes the central features of Ramism, (...)
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  12.  24
    Crucial Instances and Francis Bacon’s Quest for Certainty.Schwartz Daniel - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):130-150.
    Francis Bacon’s method of induction is often understood as a form of eliminative induction. The idea, on this interpretation, is to list the possible formal causes of a phenomenon and, by reference to a copious and reliable natural history, to falsify all of them but one. Whatever remains must be the formal cause. Bacon’s crucial instances are often seen as the crowning example of this method. In this article, I argue that this interpretation of crucial instances is mistaken, and it (...)
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  13. An Unsolved Problem for Slote's Agent-Based Virtue Ethics.Jacobson Daniel - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 111 (1):53 - 67.
    According to Slote's ``agent-based'' virtue ethics, the rightness orwrongness of an act is determined by the motive it expresses. Thistheory has a problem with cases where an agent can do her duty onlyby expressing some vicious motive and thereby acting wrongly. In sucha situation, an agent can only act wrongly; hence, the theory seemsincompatible with the maxim that `ought' implies `can'. I argue thatSlote's attempt to circumvent this problem by appealing to compatibilism is inadequate. In a wide range of psychologically (...)
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  14.  16
    Berkeley's Non-Cartesian Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):659-682.
    As central as the notion of mind is for Berkeley, it is not surprising that what he means by mind stirs debate. At issue are questions about not only what kind of thing a mind is but also how we can know it. This convergence of ontological and epistemological interests in discussing mind has led some commentators to argue that Berkeley's appeal to the Cartesian vocabulary of 'spiritual substance' signals his appropriation of elements of Descartes's theory of mind. But in (...)
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  15. Berkeley's Doctrine of Mind and the “Black List Hypothesis”: A Dialogue.Stephen H. Daniel - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):24-41.
    Clues about what Berkeley was planning to say about mind in his now-lost second volume of the Principles seem to abound in his Notebooks. However, commentators have been reluctant to use his unpublished entries to explicate his remarks about spiritual substances in the Principles and Dialogues for three reasons. First, it has proven difficult to reconcile the seemingly Humean bundle theory of the self in the Notebooks with Berkeley's published characterization of spirits as “active beings or principles.” Second, the fact (...)
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  16.  6
    Philosophy for Children: The Continuation of Dewey's Democratic Project.Marie-France Daniel, Michael Schleifer & Pierre Lebouis - 1992 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 13 (1).
    Matthew Lipman is an American philosopher who conceived, in the 1970s, a method to help children think in an autonomous, critical and reasonable way. This method is a global approach which aims to develop the personal as well as the intellectual, the moral and the social aspects of the person; it is an educative project in the broad sense of the term. This holistic project takes the form of a program of philosophy for students from five to fifteen years old. (...)
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  17. New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought.Stephen H. Daniel (ed.) - 2007 - Humanity Books.
    In this set of previously unpublished essays, noted scholars from North America and Europe describe how the Irish philosopher George Berkeley (1684-1753) continues to inspire debates about his views on knowledge, reality, God, freedom, mathematics, and religion. Here discussions about Berkeley's account of physical objects, minds, and God's role in human experience are resolved within explicitly ethical and theological contexts. This collection uses debates about Berkeley's immaterialism and theory of ideas to open up a discussion of how divine activity and (...)
     
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  18.  36
    H. Richard Niebuhr's Reading of George Herbert Mead: Correcting, Completing, and Looking Ahead.Joshua Daniel - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (1):92-115.
    In this essay, I reconstruct H. Richard Niebuhr's interpretation of George Herbert Mead's account of the social constitution of the self. Specifically, I correct Niebuhr's interpretation, because it mischaracterizes Mead's understanding of social constitution as more dialogical than ecological. I also argue that Niebuhr's interpretation needs completing because it fails to engage one of Mead's more significant notions, the I/me distinction within the self. By reconstructing Niebuhr's account of faith and responsibility as theologically self-constitutive through Mead's I/me distinction, I demonstrate (...)
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  19.  39
    Vico's Historicism and the Ontology of Arguments.Stephen H. Daniel - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):431-446.
    Vico's historicist claims (1) that different ages are intelligible only in their own terms and (2) that the certainty and authority of history depend on its narrative formulation seem at odds with his doctrines of ideal eternal history and divine providence. He resolves these issues, however, in his treatment of ideal eternal history by using the distinction between the certain and the true to show how rhetorical expression generates meaning in and as history. Specifically, by appealing to an ontology that (...)
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  20.  7
    The Double Procession of the Holy Spirit in Joachim of Fiore's Understanding of History.E. Daniel - 1980 - Speculum 55 (3):469-483.
    Since the composition of the Expositio super Hieremiam in the 1240s, Joachim's disciples as well as many scholars less sympathetic to him have been fascinated by his vision of a third status, identified with the Holy Spirit, surpassing or even superseding the status of the Father and that of the Son. By unanimous agreement the three status are the historical expression of the relationships within the three persons of the trinity. Consequently, it is impossible to understand Joachim's historical patterns without (...)
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  21.  9
    Typology in the Passion Narratives: Daniel, Elijah, Melchizedek.J. S. - 1965 - Heythrop Journal 6 (3):302–309.
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  22. Daniel Dennett's Intuition Pumps. [REVIEW]Brendan Shea - 2015 - Reason Papers 37 (2).
    A review of Daniel Dennett's Intuition Pumps (W.V. Norton: 2013).
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  23.  10
    A Feminist Sociologist Responds to Daniel's "Exclusion and Emphasis Reframed as a Matter of Ethics".Gail Dines - 1995 - Ethics and Behavior 5 (4):369 – 371.
    (1995). A Feminist Sociologist Responds to Daniel's 'Exclusion and Emphasis Reframed as a Matter of Ethics' Ethics & Behavior: Vol. 5, No. 4, pp. 369-371.
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  24.  46
    Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus by Daniel S. Werner (Review).Doug Al-Maini - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):161-162.
    The Phaedrus continues to fascinate. But then, that seems to be precisely the point, and scholars are doing an ever-better job of showing how the Phaedrus accomplishes the interest it generates, both in itself and in philosophy generally. The latest commentary to unravel the propaedeutic nature of the Phaedrus is Daniel Werner’s monograph, and it is a well-written, meticulous, and insightful examination. As his title suggests, Werner limits himself to the topic of myths in the Phaedrus, but that lens (...)
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  25. RoboMary, Blue Banana Tricks, and the Metaphysics of Consciousness: A Critique of Daniel Dennett's Apology for Physicalism.John M. DePoe - 2013 - Philosophia Christi 15 (1):119-132.
    Daniel Dennett has argued that consciousness can be satisfactorily accounted for in terms of physical entities and processes. In some of his most recent publications, he has made this case by casting doubts on purely conceptual thought experiments and proposing his own thought experiments to "pump" the intuition that consciousness can be physical. In this paper, I will summarize Dennett's recent defenses of physicalism, followed by a careful critique of his position. The critique presses two flaws in Dennett's defense (...)
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  26. The Mystical Stance: The Experience of Self‐Loss and Daniel Dennett's “Center of Narrative Gravity”.William Simpson - 2014 - Zygon 49 (2):458-475.
    For centuries, mystically inclined practitioners from various religious traditions have articulated anomalous and mystical experiences. One common aspect of these experiences is the feeling of the loss of the sense of self, referred to as “self-loss.” The occurrence of “self-loss” can be understood as the feeling of losing the subject/object distinction in one's phenomenal experience. In this article, the author attempts to incorporate these anomalous experiences into modern understandings of the mind and “self” from philosophy and psychology. Accounts of self-loss (...)
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  27.  25
    Whitehead's Religious Thought: From Mechanism to Organism, From Force to Persuasion by Daniel A. Dombrowski.Brandon Daniel-Hughes - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (3):499-503.
    Most theisms and atheisms share an assumption about what divine action would look like; if God is real and acts in the world, then God acts through intervention, invading the mechanistic world as an alien agent. Whitehead's Religious Thought takes dead aim at this contention, arguing that such conceptions of divine intervention emerge from and reinforce a problematic dualism that permeates western theological discourse. Throughout his text Daniel A. Dombrowski links dualistic conceptions of human experience with metaphysical dualism, but (...)
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  28.  61
    The Virtues (and a Few Vices) of Daniel Russell's Practical Intelligence and the Virtues.Christopher Toner - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):453-468.
    Daniel Russell's Practical Intelligence and the Virtues is principally a defense of the Aristotelian claim that phronesis is part of every unqualified virtue—a defense of what Russell calls "hard virtue theory" and "hard virtue ethics." The main support for this is the further claim that we would be unable to act well reliably, or form our character reliably, without phronesis performing its "twin roles": correctly identifying the mean of each virtue, and integrating the mean of each virtue with those (...)
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  29.  44
    Comments on Daniel E. Flage’s “Berkeley’s Contingent Necessities”.Giovanni Battista Grandi - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):373-378.
    According to Daniel Flage, Berkeley thinks that all necessary truths are founded on acts of will that assign meanings to words. After briefly commenting on the air of paradox contained in the title of Flage’s paper, and on the historical accuracy of Berkeley’s understanding of the abstractionist tradition, I make some remarks on two points made by Flage. Firstly, I discuss Flage’s distinction between the ontological ground of a necessary truth and our knowledge of a necessary truth. Secondly, I (...)
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  30. When Consciousness Matters: A Critical Review of Daniel Wegner's the Illusion of Conscious Will. [REVIEW]Eddy A. Nahmias - 2002 - Philosophical Psychology 15 (4):527-541.
    In The illusion of conscious will , Daniel Wegner offers an exciting, informative, and potentially threatening treatise on the psychology of action. I offer several interpretations of the thesis that conscious will is an illusion. The one Wegner seems to suggest is "modular epiphenomenalism": conscious experience of will is produced by a brain system distinct from the system that produces action; it interprets our behavior but does not, as it seems to us, cause it. I argue that the evidence (...)
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  31.  27
    Is Attention Really Effort? Revisiting Daniel Kahneman’s Influential 1973 Book Attention and Effort.Brian Bruya & Yi-Yuan Tang - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Daniel Kahneman was not the first to suggest that attention and effort are closely associated, but his 1973 book Attention and Effort, which claimed that attention can be identified with effort, cemented the association as a research paradigm in the cognitive sciences. Since then, the paradigm has rarely been questioned and appears to have set the research agenda so that it is self-reinforcing. In this article, we retrace Kahneman's argument to understand its strengths and weaknesses. The central notion of (...)
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  32.  64
    Daniel Bell’s ‘Disjunction of the Realms’.Jordan McKenzie - 2013 - Thesis Eleven 118 (1):96-104.
    Daniel Bell’s multidimensional view of modern social life as a disjunction of differing realms provides an effective example of a sociological analysis that defies typical notions of Left/Right and radical/conservative. Within this framework, Bell moves between traditional alliances, and his unwillingness to take sides makes it difficult to place him within traditional categories. Using Bell as an example, this paper will question the relevance of Right and Left in sociological discourse, and suggest that the distinction between conservative and radical (...)
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  33. Deliberation, Reason, and Indigestion: Response to Daniel Dombrowski's Rawls and Religion: The Case for Political Liberalism.Zandra Wagoner - 2010 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 31 (3):179-195.
    Democracy requires a rather large tolerance for confusion and a secret relish for dissent. I am delighted to respond to Daniel Dombrowski’s book Rawls and Religion. Dombrowski and I share a number of what he would call comprehensive doctrine, such as the ethical treatment of animals, the relational worldview of process thought, and the idiosyncratic love of pacifism. So, immediately I was drawn in and claimed Dombrowski as a kindred spirit. With so many commonalities, including an interest in political (...)
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  34.  18
    Migration Crisis and Christian Response: From Daniel De Groody’s Image of God Theological Prism in Migration Theology to a Migration Practical Theology Ministerial Approach and Operative Ecclesiology.Vhumani Magezi & Christopher Magezi - 2018 - Hts Theological Studies 74 (1):1-12.
    This article identifies a need to develop an operational theology that responds to migrants in a real and constructive way. It discusses Daniel Groody's image of God prism in migration theology in order to develop an integrated understanding of the image of God. It argues that Groody's image of God prism in migration theology is assumed rather than explicit and does not proceed to inform migrant ministry design. To ensure an encompassing understanding of the notion of the image of (...)
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  35.  29
    Daniel Sennert’s Slow Conversion From Hylemorphism to Atomism.Christoph Lüthy - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):99-121.
    Daniel Sennert is one of the more neglected big figures of that seventeenth-century process that goes by the shorthand name of Scientific Revolution. Born in Breslau/wroclaw in 1572, he was professor of medicine at the University of Wittenberg from 1602 until his death in 1637. However, his fame and importance were not due to his classroom teaching but to his writings, which were reprinted throughout the century in Germany, France, England, Italy, and the Netherlands, and partially translated into English. (...)
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  36. A New Mixed View of Virtue Ethics, Based on Daniel Doviak’s New Virtue Calculus.Michelle Ciurria - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):259-269.
    In A New Form of Agent-Based Virtue Ethics , Daniel Doviak develops a novel agent-based theory of right action that treats the rightness (or deontic status) of an action as a matter of the action’s net intrinsic virtue value (net-IVV)—that is, its balance of virtue over vice. This view is designed to accommodate three basic tenets of commonsense morality: (i) the maxim that “ought” implies “can,” (ii) the idea that a person can do the right thing for the wrong (...)
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  37.  32
    Corpuscular Alchemy and the Tradition of Aristotle's Meteorology, with Special Reference to Daniel Sennert.William R. Newman - 2001 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (2):145 – 153.
    (2001). Corpuscular alchemy and the tradition of Aristotle's Meteorology, with special reference to Daniel Sennert. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 145-153. doi: 10.1080/02698590120059013.
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  38.  42
    What Setting Limits May Mean: A Feminist Critique of Daniel Callahan's "Setting Limits". [REVIEW]Nora K. Bell - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (2):169 - 178.
    In Setting Limits, Daniel Callahan advances the provocative thesis that age be a limiting factor in decisions to allocate certain kinds of health services to the elderly. However, when one looks at available data, one discovers that there are many more elderly women than there are elderly men, and these older women are poorer, more apt to live alone, and less likely to have informal social and personal supports than their male counterparts. Older women, therefore, will make the heaviest (...)
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  39.  15
    Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation Reconsidered Ed. By Daniel Breazeale and Tom Rockmore.F. Scott Scribner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):548-549.
    Interpretation always takes place in the present tense. It is worth reminding ourselves of this, because few philosophical texts or treatises have suffered the rise and fall of the vagaries of their own contemporary Weltanschauung as Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation. Few texts in history have been simultaneously so overestimated and underestimated in their impact and importance as Fichte's Addresses; and therefore few texts can be said to be so misunderstood—and so need in of reassessment. This collection, Fichte's Addresses (...)
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  40.  31
    A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China's Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future by Jiang Qing, Translated by Edmund Ryden, Edited by Daniel A. Bell and Ruiping Fan (Review).Stephen C. Angle - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):502-506.
    How important is Jiang Qing, whose extraordinary proposals for political change make up the core of the new book A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China’s Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future? In his Introduction to the volume, co-editor Daniel Bell maintains that Jiang’s views are “intensely controversial” and that conversations about political reform in China rarely fail to turn to Jiang’s proposals. At least in my experience, this is something of an exaggeration. Chinese political thinking today is highly (...)
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  41.  28
    The Culture Crunch Daniel Bell's The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism.Andrew Gilbert - 2013 - Thesis Eleven 118 (1):83-95.
    Daniel Bell’s The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism lies at the intersection of the three main theoretical currents of sociological thought, those of Karl Marx, Émile Durkheim and Max Weber. His ‘three realms’ methodology moves away from deterministic accounts that subordinate the political and cultural to the economic realm. By granting each realm an autonomy and principles of their own, Bell locates the contradictions of capitalism in the friction between them. With constant innovation, individual expressiveness and libertarian social values becoming (...)
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  42.  10
    Introduction to Symposium on Daniel Hausman’s Valuing Health: Well-Being, Freedom and Suffering.James Wilson - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (2):105-108.
    This article introduces a symposium on Daniel Hausman’s Valuing Health: Well-Being, Suffering and Freedom. The symposium contains papers by Elselijn Kingma, Adam Oliver, Anna Alexandrova, Erik Nord, Alex Voorhoeve and James Wilson, with replies by Daniel Hausman. In Valuing Health, Hausman argues that, despite apparently measuring health, projects such as the Global Burden of Disease Study in fact measure judgments about the value of health. Once this has been clarified, the key question is how the value of health (...)
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  43. Comments on Daniel Garber's Leibniz: Body, Substance Monad for the Eastern.Jeffrey McDonough - unknown
    Daniel Garber’s Leibniz: Body, Substance and Monad . When I first entered graduate school Dan’s previous book Descartes’s Metaphysical Physics had recently appeared, and it made a huge and lasting impression on me. All of a sudden I saw Descartes’s project in a much different, more intriguing light. This Garber fella had managed to open up a new area of Descartes’s thought to me, to tease out with great care his philosophical arguments, and to situate both in a broader (...)
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  44.  5
    Daniel Stern′s Developmental Psychology and its Relation to Gestalt Psychology.Anna Arfelli Galli - 2017 - Gestalt Theory 39 (1):54-63.
    Summary Daniel N. Stern’s research on the first years of life offers the view of an active newborn, developing in a continuous dialogue with the Other. The mother places the infant feelings at the center of her attention. The infant gets in tune with the mother, and learns that she welcomes and understands his inner states. Such attunement is a primary holistic experience, taking place because of the infant innate ability to perceive the “interpersonal happenings” as a unitary Gestalt, (...)
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  45.  13
    Some Sociological Contemplations on Daniel J. Goldhagen's Hitler's Willing Executioners.M. Brennan - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (4):83-109.
    In this article I examine recent debates surrounding the publication of Daniel J. Goldhagen's controversial book Hitler's Willing Executioners. I do so against the `backdrop' of contention regarding the centrality of the Nazi Holocaust and the role played by Holocaust Studies - a burgeoning area of academic special interest, involving mainly historians, but also sociologists, theologians and philosophers. In particular I consider the charged disputation which have flowed from Norman G. Finkelstein's critique of Hitler's Willing Executioners and ponder what (...)
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  46. "Chequer Works of Providence": Skeptical Providentialism in Daniel Defoe's Fiction.Bridget C. Donnelly - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):107-120.
    I mention this story also as the best method I can advise any person to take in such a case, especially if he be one that makes conscience of his duty, and would be directed what to do in it, namely, that he should keep his eye upon the particular providences which occur at that time, and look upon them complexly, as they regard one another, and as all together regard the question before him: and then, I think, he may (...)
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  47.  5
    Sigrid Schmalzer; Daniel S. Chard; Alyssa Botelho . Science for the People: Documents From America’s Movement of Radical Scientists. Ix + 236 Pp., Index. Amherst/Boston: University of Massachusetts Press, 2018. $90 . ISBN 9781625343178. [REVIEW]Sean Gilleran - 2019 - Isis 110 (1):220-221.
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  48.  5
    Bringing Statistical Methods to Community and Evolutionary Ecology: Daniel S. Simberloff.William Dritschilo - 2008 - In Oren Harman & Michael Dietrich (eds.), Rebels, Mavericks, and Heretics in Biology. Yale University Press. pp. 356.
  49.  23
    Daniel S. Robinson, "Royce and Hocking: American Idealists". [REVIEW]Ignas K. Skrupskelis - 1969 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 7 (3):343.
  50.  19
    David B. Resnik. The Price of Truth: How Money Affects the Norms of Science. Xiii + 224 Pp., Bibl., Index. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. $29.95 .Daniel S. Greenberg. Science for Sale: The Perils, Rewards, and Delusions of Campus Capitalism. Viii + 324 Pp., Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2007. $25. [REVIEW]John W. Servos - 2009 - Isis 100 (1):199-200.
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