51 found
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  1. Technology with No Human Responsibility?Deborah G. Johnson - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (4):707-715.
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  2. Why robots should not be treated like animals.Deborah G. Johnson & Mario Verdicchio - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (4):291-301.
    Responsible Robotics is about developing robots in ways that take their social implications into account, which includes conceptually framing robots and their role in the world accurately. We are now in the process of incorporating robots into our world and we are trying to figure out what to make of them and where to put them in our conceptual, physical, economic, legal, emotional and moral world. How humans think about robots, especially humanoid social robots, which elicit complex and sometimes disconcerting (...)
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  3. Reframing AI Discourse.Deborah G. Johnson & Mario Verdicchio - 2017 - Minds and Machines 27 (4):575-590.
    A critically important ethical issue facing the AI research community is how AI research and AI products can be responsibly conceptualised and presented to the public. A good deal of fear and concern about uncontrollable AI is now being displayed in public discourse. Public understanding of AI is being shaped in a way that may ultimately impede AI research. The public discourse as well as discourse among AI researchers leads to at least two problems: a confusion about the notion of (...)
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  4. Un-making artificial moral agents.Deborah G. Johnson & Keith W. Miller - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):123-133.
    Floridi and Sanders, seminal work, “On the morality of artificial agents” has catalyzed attention around the moral status of computer systems that perform tasks for humans, effectively acting as “artificial agents.” Floridi and Sanders argue that the class of entities considered moral agents can be expanded to include computers if we adopt the appropriate level of abstraction. In this paper we argue that the move to distinguish levels of abstraction is far from decisive on this issue. We also argue that (...)
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  5. AI, agency and responsibility: the VW fraud case and beyond.Deborah G. Johnson & Mario Verdicchio - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (3):639-647.
    The concept of agency as applied to technological artifacts has become an object of heated debate in the context of AI research because some AI researchers ascribe to programs the type of agency traditionally associated with humans. Confusion about agency is at the root of misconceptions about the possibilities for future AI. We introduce the concept of a triadic agency that includes the causal agency of artifacts and the intentional agency of humans to better describe what happens in AI as (...)
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  6.  19
    The sociotechnical entanglement of AI and values.Deborah G. Johnson & Mario Verdicchio - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-10.
    Scholarship on embedding values in AI is growing. In what follows, we distinguish two concepts of AI and argue that neither is amenable to values being ‘embedded’. If we think of AI as computational artifacts, then values and AI cannot be added together because they are ontologically distinct. If we think of AI as sociotechnical systems, then components of values and AI are in the same ontologic category—they are both social. However, even here thinking about the relationship as one of (...)
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  7.  64
    Negotiating autonomy and responsibility in military robots.Merel Noorman & Deborah G. Johnson - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (1):51-62.
    Central to the ethical concerns raised by the prospect of increasingly autonomous military robots are issues of responsibility. In this paper we examine different conceptions of autonomy within the discourse on these robots to bring into focus what is at stake when it comes to the autonomous nature of military robots. We argue that due to the metaphorical use of the concept of autonomy, the autonomy of robots is often treated as a black box in discussions about autonomous military robots. (...)
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  8. Computer systems and responsibility: A normative look at technological complexity.Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):99-107.
    In this paper, we focus attention on the role of computer system complexity in ascribing responsibility. We begin by introducing the notion of technological moral action (TMA). TMA is carried out by the combination of a computer system user, a system designer (developers, programmers, and testers), and a computer system (hardware and software). We discuss three sometimes overlapping types of responsibility: causal responsibility, moral responsibility, and role responsibility. Our analysis is informed by the well-known accounts provided by Hart and Hart (...)
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  9.  53
    Computers as surrogate agents.Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers - 2008 - In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 251.
  10.  58
    Collective responsibility and professional roles.Albert Flores & Deborah G. Johnson - 1982 - Ethics 93 (3):537-545.
  11.  66
    Computer ethics: philosophical enquiry.Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani - 2000 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (4):6-9.
  12.  45
    Is the global information infrastructure a democratic technology?Deborah G. Johnson - 1997 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 27 (3):20-26.
  13.  43
    Computer Ethics.Deborah G. Johnson - 2003 - In Luciano Floridi (ed.), The Blackwell guide to the philosophy of computing and information. Blackwell. pp. 63–75.
    The prelims comprise: Introduction Metatheoretical and Methodological Issues Applied and Synthetic Ethics Traditional and Emerging Issues Conclusion Websites and Other Resources.
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  14.  26
    Introduction.Deborah G. Johnson, Norman E. Bowie & Thomas Donaldson - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (4):695-697.
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  15.  28
    Should computer programs be owned?Deborah G. Johnson - 1985 - Metaphilosophy 16 (4):276-288.
  16.  62
    Forbidden Knowledge and Science as Professional Activity.Deborah G. Johnson - 1996 - The Monist 79 (2):197-217.
    Since the idea of forbidden knowledge is rooted in the biblical story of Adam and Eve eating from the forbidden tree of knowledge, its meaning today, in particular as a metaphor for scientific knowledge, is not so obvious. We can and should ask questions about the autonomy of science.
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  17.  21
    Algorithmic Accountability In the Making.Deborah G. Johnson - 2021 - Social Philosophy and Policy 38 (2):111-127.
    Algorithms are now routinely used in decision-making; they are potent components in decisions that affect the lives of individuals and the activities of public and private institutions. Although use of algorithms has many benefits, a number of problems have been identified with their use in certain domains, most notably in domains where safety and fairness are important. Awareness of these problems has generated public discourse calling for algorithmic accountability. However, the current discourse focuses largely on algorithms and their opacity. I (...)
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  18.  20
    Engineering Ethics: Contemporary and Enduring Debates.Deborah G. Johnson - 2020 - New Haven [Connecticut]: Yale University Press.
    _An engaging, accessible survey of the ethical issues faced by engineers, designed for students_ The first engineering ethics textbook to use debates as the framework for presenting engineering ethics topics, this engaging, accessible survey explores the most difficult and controversial issues that engineers face in daily practice. Written by a leading scholar in the field of engineering and computer ethics, Deborah Johnson approaches engineering ethics with three premises: that engineering is both a technical and a social endeavor; that engineers don’t (...)
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  19.  23
    Corporate Excellence, Ethics, and the Role of IT.Deborah G. Johnson - 2006 - Business and Society Review 111 (4):457-470.
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  20.  49
    Reframing the question of forbidden knowledge for modern science.Deborah G. Johnson - 1999 - Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):445-461.
    In this paper I use the concept of forbidden knowledge to explore questions about putting limits on science. Science has generally been understood to seek and produce objective truth, and this understanding of science has grounded its claim to freedom of inquiry. What happens to decision making about science when this claim to objective, disinterested truth is rejected? There are two changes that must be made to update the idea of forbidden knowledge for modern science. The first is to shift (...)
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  21. Computer systems: Moral entities but not moral agents. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):195-204.
    After discussing the distinction between artifacts and natural entities, and the distinction between artifacts and technology, the conditions of the traditional account of moral agency are identified. While computer system behavior meets four of the five conditions, it does not and cannot meet a key condition. Computer systems do not have mental states, and even if they could be construed as having mental states, they do not have intendings to act, which arise from an agent’s freedom. On the other hand, (...)
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  22.  45
    Do Engineers have Social Responsibilities?Deborah G. Johnson - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):21-34.
    ABSTRACT Most American engineers believe that they have a responsibility for the safety and well‐being of society, but whence does this responsibility arise? What does it entail? After describing engineering practice in America as compared with the practice of other professions, this paper examines two standard types of accounts of the social responsibilities of professionals. While neither provides a satisfactory account of the social responsibilities of American engineers, several lessons are learned by uncovering their weaknesses. Identifying the framework in which (...)
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  23.  23
    Equal Access to Computing, Computing Expertise, and Decision Making About Computers.Deborah G. Johnson - 1985 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (3-4):95-104.
  24.  12
    Computer Ethics.Deborah G. Johnson - 2003 - In R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.), A Companion to Applied Ethics. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 608–619.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Technology, Ethics, and the Instrumentation of Human Action The Genus‐Species Account Avoiding the Mistake of Unique Technology Avoiding the Mistake of the Applied Ethics Model Conclusion Acknowledgment.
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  25.  16
    Computer ethics.Deborah G. Johnson - 1985 - Prentice-Hall.
  26.  51
    Why teach ethics in science and engineering?Rachelle D. Hollander, Deborah G. Johnson, Jonathan R. Beckwith & Betsy Fader - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):83-87.
    The following views were presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Seminar “Teaching Ethics in Science and Engineering”, 10–11 February 1993 organized by Stephanie J. Bird , Penny J. Gilmer and Terrell W. Bynum . Opragen Publications thanks the AAAS, seminar organizers and authors for permission to publish extracts from the conference. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not reflect the opinions of AAAS or its Board of Directors.
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  27. Ethics and technology: a program for future research.Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers - 2009 - In M. Winston and R. Edelbach (ed.), Society, Ethics, and Technology, 4th edition.
    This chapter is reprinted from our lead essay in the Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics, ed. C. Mitcham, Gale, 2005.
     
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  28. Editorial.Deborah G. Johnson - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):373-375.
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  29. Sorting out the question of feminist technology.Deborah G. Johnson - 2010 - In Linda L. Layne, Sharra Louise Vostral & Kate Boyer (eds.), Feminist Technology. University of Illinois Press. pp. 21--58.
  30.  34
    Cryptography, data retention, and the panopticon society (abstract).Jean-François Blanchette & Deborah G. Johnson - 1998 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (2):1-2.
    As we move our social institutions from paper and ink based operations to the electronic medium, we invisibly create a type of surveillance society, a panopticon society. It is not the traditional surveillance society in which government officials follow citizens around because they are concerned about threats to the political order. Instead it is piecemeal surveillance by public and private organizations. Piecemeal though it is, It creates the potential for the old kind of surveillance on an even grander scale. The (...)
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  31.  4
    A Brief Communication On Job Information.Deborah G. Johnson - unknown
  32.  36
    Anonymity, pseudonymity, or inescapable identity on the net (abstract).Deborah G. Johnson & Keith Miller - 1998 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (2):37-38.
    The first topic of concern is anonymity, specifically the anonymity that is available in communications on the Internet. An earlier paper argues that anonymity in electronic communication is problematic because: it makes law enforcement difficult ; it frees individuals to behave in socially undesirable and harmful ways ; it diminishes the integrity of information since one can't be sure who information is coming from, whether it has been altered on the way, etc.; and all three of the above contribute to (...)
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  33.  14
    A Reply to “Should Computer Programs Be Ownable?”.Deborah G. Johnson - 1993 - Metaphilosophy 24 (1-2):85-90.
  34.  82
    Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994).Deborah G. Johnson - 1993 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
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  35.  40
    Chapter 20: Ethics in Engineering and Computing Technology.Deborah G. Johnson - 2006 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 10 (2):191-201.
  36.  22
    Chapter 20: Ethics in Engineering and Computing Technology.Deborah G. Johnson - 2006 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 10 (2):191-201.
  37.  32
    Commentary on “Sherry's secret”.Deborah G. Johnson - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):151-152.
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  38.  36
    Ethical issues in computing.Deborah G. Johnson - 1984 - Metaphilosophy 15 (1):68–73.
  39.  4
    Ethical Issues Surrounding Toxic Substances.Deborah G. Johnson - 1985 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (4):43-48.
  40. Legal Responsibility, Legal Liability and the Explanation of Action.Deborah G. Johnson - 1976 - Dissertation, University of Kansas
  41.  30
    Moral Accountability in Corporations.Deborah G. Johnson - 1982 - Philosophical Topics 13 (9999):143-151.
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  42.  23
    Philosophy and Design From Engineering to Architecture.Deborah G. Johnson - 2009 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 13 (2):162-164.
  43.  8
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute: The Department of Science and Technology Studies.Deborah G. Johnson - 1997 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 17 (5-6):305-306.
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  44.  8
    A Reply to “Should Computer Programs Be Ownable?”.Deborah G. Johnson - 1993 - Metaphilosophy 24 (1-2):85-90.
  45.  10
    Section 3. Local Boundaries.Deborah G. Johnson, Paul Thompson & Albert Borgmann - 2020 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 24 (4):28-30.
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  46.  16
    Case Studies: Health Risks and Equal Opportunity.Robert E. Stevenson, Deborah G. Johnson & Knut Ringen - 1980 - Hastings Center Report 10 (6):25.
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  47.  72
    Ethics and technology 'in the making': An essay on the challenge of nanoethics. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (1):21-30.
    After reviewing portions of the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act that call for examination of societal and ethical issues, this essay seeks to understand how nanoethics can play a role in nanotechnology development. What can and should nanoethics aim to achieve? The focus of the essay is on the challenges of examining ethical issues with regard to a technology that is still emerging, still ‘in the making.’ The literature of science and technology studies (STS) is used to understand (...)
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  48.  68
    Book reviews. [REVIEW]Eric A. Weiss, Justin Leiber, Judith Felson Duchan, Mallory Selfridge, Eric Dietrich, Peter A. Facione, Timothy Joseph Day, Johan M. Lammens, Andrew Feenberg, Deborah G. Johnson, Daniel S. Levine & Ted A. Warfield - 1995 - Minds and Machines 5 (1):109-155.
  49.  7
    Book Reviews : Saints and Scamps: Ethics in Academia, by Steven M. Cahn. Iotowa, NJ: Rowman & Littlefield, 1986, xii + 112 pp. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson - 1989 - Science, Technology and Human Values 14 (2):213-214.
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  50. Introduction to computer ethics: Philosophy enquiry. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):1-2.
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