Results for 'Divine Comedy'

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  1.  99
    The Divine Comedy’s Construction of its Audience in Paradiso 2.1-18.Jason Aleksander - 2015 - Essays in Medieval Studies 30:1-10.
    Paradiso 2’s sustained direct address warns readers unprepared for its complexities to “turn back to see your shores again…for perhaps losing me, you would be lost,” but then offers the “other few” who crave “the bread of angels” the promise of a marvel that would rival the deeds of the mythological hero Jason. I will argue that, by appearing to impose this choice on its readers, this direct address in fact activates the craving for the bread of angels (for who, (...)
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  2. The Divine Comedy. Dante - 2006 - In Thomas L. Cooksey (ed.), Masterpieces of Philosophical Literature. Greenwood Press.
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  3. The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Inferno. [REVIEW]John Scott - 1998 - The Medieval Review 12.
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  4.  5
    Divine Comedies: Post-Theology and Laughter in the Films of Bruno Dumont.Chelsea Birks & Lisa Coulthard - 2019 - Film-Philosophy 23 (3):247-263.
    The films of Bruno Dumont are tied to unwatchability, austerity, and a post-theological seriousness. Recently, however, Dumont has taken a surprising turn towards comedy; and yet these comedies are not without the post-theological despair that characterizes his earlier films. Taking Dumont's comedy seriously, this article frames Dumont's comedic turn not as a deviation but rather as a realignment that requires retroactive reconsideration of his oeuvre's post-theological orientation. We interrogate the philosophical implications of laughter in Dumont's work and argue (...)
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  5. Teaching the Divine Comedy's Understanding of Philosophy.Jason Aleksander - 2012 - Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture 13 (1):67-76.
    This essay discusses five main topoi in the Divine Comedy through which teachers might encourage students to explore the question of the Divine Comedy’s treatment of philosophy. These topoi are: (1) The Divine Comedy’s representations in Inferno of noble pagans who are allegorically or historically associated with philosophy or natural reason; (2) its treatment of the relationship between faith and reason and that relationship’s consequences for the text’s understanding of the respective authoritativeness of theology (...)
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  6.  46
    The Divine Comedy and the “Spiritual Exercises”.Dominic Cirigliano - 1935 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 10 (3):410-436.
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  7.  23
    Divine Comedy.Allan Gotthelf - 1982 - Ancient Philosophy 2 (2):160-160.
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  8.  42
    The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: A Poetic Translation in Iambic Pentameter and Terza Rima. [REVIEW]Robert S. Dupree - 1998 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 72 (1):123-124.
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  9.  15
    The Divine Comedy: connections between Dante and Agamben.Célio Antonio Sardagna - 2014 - Synesis 6 (2):21-48.
  10.  14
    Human Tragedy, Divine Comedy: The Painfulness of Conversion in Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited.Rosemary C. Johnson - 2012 - Renascence 64 (2):161-175.
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  11.  18
    Illuminated Manuscripts Of The Divine Comedy, I: Text, Ii: Plates. [REVIEW]J. Alexander - 1972 - Speculum 47 (2):514-517.
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  12.  14
    Dante's Divine Comedy, Augustine's Confessions, and the Redemption of Beauty.Nancy Enright - 2007 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 10 (1):32-55.
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  13.  3
    Dante Theologian: The Divine Comedy[REVIEW]J. J. Rolbiecki - 1949 - New Scholasticism 23 (1):121-122.
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  14.  9
    Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, A Verse Translation: “Paradiso,” 1: Introduction, Italian Text and Translation, Trans. Allen Mandelbaum. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1982. Pp. Xxi, 307; Illustrated. $29.95. [REVIEW]Richard H. Lansing - 1986 - Speculum 61 (2):495-496.
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  15.  7
    Dante’s Divine Comedy: A Journey Without End. By Ian Thomson. Pp. 288, London, Head of Zeus, 2018, £18.99.Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):525-525.
  16.  5
    Islam and the Divine Comedy. Miguel Asin, Harold Sunderland.George Sarton - 1928 - Isis 10 (1):65-69.
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  17.  5
    Islam and the Divine Comedy by Miguel Asin; Harold Sunderland. [REVIEW]George Sarton - 1928 - Isis 10:65-69.
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  18.  14
    Medicine in the Divine Comedy and Early Commentaries.Dr Plinio Prioreschi - 1994 - Journal of Medical Humanities 15 (1):51-72.
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  19.  18
    Medicine in the Divine Comedy and Early Commentaries.Plinio Prioreschi - 1994 - Journal of Medical Humanities 15 (1):51-72.
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  20.  62
    The Uncanonical Dante: The Divine Comedy and Islamic Philosophy.Paul Arthur Cantor - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (1):138-153.
  21.  45
    Dante, La Divine Comédie.Gerald G. Walsh - 1952 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 27 (3):450-454.
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  22. The Aporetic Ground of Revelation’s Authority in the Divine Comedy and Dante’s Demarcation and Defense of Philosophical Authority.Jason Aleksander - 2010 - Essays in Medieval Studies 26:1-14.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how, for Dante, this understanding defines philosophy’s and revelation’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. Specifically, I show that, although Dante subordinates our earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude in a way that seems to suggest the subordination of the authority of philosophy to that of revelation, he in fact limits philosophy’s scope to an arena in which its authority is not only legitimate but also (...)
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  23.  4
    Secularization of the Fall Into Sin Based on Dante's Divine Comedy.A. U. Yagodina, I. A. Serova & A. V. Petrov - 2020 - Bioethics 25 (1):31-34.
    The article presents the results of an interview in a student’s group on the problem of the fall into sin based on the discussion at the seminar of Dante's «divine Comedy». The authors consider human as an image and likeness of God, who creates himself, choosing between good and harm. There were changes in the perception of the structure of Inferno: the number of circles of hell in the minds of young people interviewed decreased: all respondents do not (...)
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  24. Movement and Meaning in the Divine Comedy: Toward an Understanding of Dante's Processional Poetics: Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 14.Sandro Sticca (ed.) - 2005 - The Bernardo Lecture Series.
    _Argues that the analysis of movement and its correlative procession in the Divine Comedy is fundamental to an understanding of how Dante generates meaning in his poetic text._.
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  25. Diagram and Metaphor in Design: The Divine Comedy as a Spatial Model.Aarati Kanekar - 2002 - Philosophica 70.
    Translations across symbolic forms necessarily involve shifts and transformations of meaning due to the logic of the medium. They challenge us to examine fundamental metaphors as an aspect of design reasoning, particularly in relation to the construction of spatial relationships and meanings. They also involve the exploration of diagrams as a way of moving from the space of linguistic description to architectural space where topology and visual image are tightly interfaced. In this paper, Terragni's unrealized design for a monument to (...)
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  26. Movement and Meaning in the Divine Comedy: Toward an Understanding of Dante's Processional Poetics: Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 14.Christopher Kleinhenz - 2005 - The Bernardo Lecture Series.
    Argues that the analysis of movement and its correlative procession in the Divine Comedy is fundamental to an understanding of how Dante generates meaning in his poetic text.
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  27. Figures de l’indicible dans la Divine Comédie.Hélène Leblanc - 2013 - In J. Dünne/M.-J. Schäfer/M. Suchet/J. Wilker (ed.), Les Intraduisibles en poésie. Paris, France: pp. 161-170.
     
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  28. Number and Geometrical Design in the Divine Comedy.H. D. Austin - 1935 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 16 (4):310.
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  29. Freedom and Necessity in the Divine Comedy.Thomas Lyle Collins - 1942 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 23 (1):62.
     
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  30. Error Left Me and Fear Came in its Place" : The Arrested Sublime of the Giants in Divine Comedy, Canto XXXI.Eleonora Stoppino - 2010 - In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  31. Karla Taylor, Chaucer Reads “The Divine Comedy.” Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1989. Pp. Ix, 289. $29.50. [REVIEW]Piero Boitani - 1992 - Speculum 67 (3):750-752.
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  32. The Aristotelian Structure of Justice in the Divine Comedy.Anne M. Wiles - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:145-153.
    The argument of this paper is that the Aristotelian analysis of justice and related concepts provides the best framework for understanding the structure and importance of justice in Dante’s Commedia. After giving a synopsis of the principle features of Aristotle’s account of justice in Book 5 of the Nicomachean Ethics, I consider a few scenes from the Inferno, the Purgatorio, and the Paradiso, showing how the punishments and rewards Dante describes are based on the Aristotelian analysis of justice. Finally, I (...)
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  33. Goethe's Faust and Dante's Divine Comedy.F. Mceachran - 1931 - Hibbert Journal 30:638.
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  34. Dante Between Hope and Despair: The Tradition of Lamentations in the Divine Comedy.Ronald L. Martinez - 2002 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 5 (3).
     
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  35. Hermeneutics, Historicity, and Poetry as Theological Revelation in Dante's Divine Comedy.William Franke - 2007 - In Jan Lloyd Jones (ed.), Art and Time. Australian Scholarly Publishing. pp. 39.
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  36.  48
    Can We Inhabit the Moral Universe of Dante's Divine Comedy?Brian Horne - 2003 - Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (1):61-71.
    This paper maintains that, for all his ethical interests, his philosophical and theological essays, political treatises and linguistic studies, Dante was primarily a poet; a poet who, moreover, believed that poetry could change the world, and that the Comedy must be read, first, as a poem. This is not a trivial point, because the Comedy remains a text that is endlessly fascinating to philosophers and theologians as well as moralists who read it for its philosophy, theology and ethics (...)
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  37.  30
    Semiotic Insights of the Absolute Paradox in the Divine Comedy.Raffaele DeBenedictis - 2014 - Semiotics:29-46.
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  38.  37
    Modern Aesthetics and the Poetry of the Divine Comedy.Don Luigi Sturzo - 1990 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 65 (3):400-414.
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  39.  42
    Modern Aesthetics and the Poetry of the Divine Comedy.Luigi Sturzo - 1942 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 17 (3):412-432.
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  40.  23
    The Original Plan of the Divine Comedy.Hiram Peri - 1955 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 18 (3/4):189-210.
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  41.  4
    “Dante’s Preparation For The ‘Divine Comedy’,”.W. H. V. Reade - 1937 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 21 (1):215-243.
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  42.  13
    Dante’s Sacred Poem: Flesh and the Centrality of the Eucharist to the Divine Comedy.Michael Moore - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (8):862-865.
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  43.  79
    The Aristotelian Structure of Justice in the Divine Comedy.Anne M. Wiles - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:145-153.
    The argument of this paper is that the Aristotelian analysis of justice and related concepts provides the best framework for understanding the structure and importance of justice in Dante’s Commedia. After giving a synopsis of the principle features of Aristotle’s account of justice in Book 5 of the Nicomachean Ethics, I consider a few scenes from the Inferno, the Purgatorio, and the Paradiso, showing how the punishments and rewards Dante describes are based on the Aristotelian analysis of justice. Finally, I (...)
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  44.  2
    The Divine Average: A View of Comedy.William G. Mccollom - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (3):438-439.
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  45. Diviners and Divination in Aristophanic Comedy.Nicholas D. Smith - 1989 - Classical Antiquity 8 (1):140-158.
  46. From Divine to Human: Dante's Circle Vs. Boccaccio's Parodic Centers: Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 16.Dino S. Cervigni - 2009 - The Bernardo Lecture Series.
    In Boccacio's Decameron, Cervigni sees a parodic echo of the circles of Dante's Divine Comedy, and asks whether Bocaccio envisions the voyage of the brigata as similar to Dante the Pilgrim's journey toward the center, first the abysmal center of Lucifer, then towards the highest center, God.
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  47.  1
    The Divine Vision of Dante's Paradiso: The Metaphysics of Representation.William Franke - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Canto XVIII of Paradiso, Dante sees thirty-five letters of Scripture - LOVE JUSTICE, YOU WHO RULE THE EARTH - 'painted' one after the other in the sky. It is an epiphany that encapsulates the Paradiso, staging its ultimate goal - the divine vision. This book offers a fresh, intensive reading of this extraordinary passage at the heart of the third canticle of the Divine Comedy. While adapting in novel ways the methods of the traditional lectura Dantis, (...)
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  48. From Divine to Human: Dante's Circle Vs. Boccaccio's Parodic Centers: Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 16.Dana E. Stewart (ed.) - 2009 - The Bernardo Lecture Series.
    _In Boccacio's Decameron, Cervigni sees a parodic echo of the circles of Dante's Divine Comedy, and asks whether Bocaccio envisions the voyage of the brigata as similar to Dante the Pilgrim's journey toward the center, first the abysmal center of Lucifer, then towards the highest center, God._.
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  49.  1
    The Divine Manifold.Roland Faber - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    In an intricate play on Dante’s Divine Comedy, this book engages questions of religion and philosophy through the aporetic dynamics of love and power, locating its discussions in the midst of, and in between the spheres of a genuine philosophy of multiplicity.
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  50. "And Why Not?" Hegel, Comedy, and the End of Art.Lydia L. Moland - 2016 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane (1-2):73-104.
    Towards the very end of his wide-ranging lectures on the philosophy of art, Hegel unexpectedly expresses a preference for comedy over tragedy. More surprisingly, given his systematic claims for his aesthetic theory, he suggests that this preference is arbitrary. This essay suggests that this arbitrariness is itself systematic, given Hegel’s broader claims about unity and necessity in art generally and his analysis of ancient as opposed to modern drama in particular. With the emergence of modern subjectivity, tragic plots lose (...)
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