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  1. Daniel Howard-Snyder, Frances Howard-Snyder & Ryan Wasserman (2013). The Power of Logic, 5th Edition. McGraw-Hill.
    This is a basic logic text for first-time logic students. Custom-made texts from the chapters is an option as well. And there is a website to go with text too: http://www.poweroflogic.com/cgi/menu.cgi .
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  2. Frances Howard-Snyder (2012). Book Reviews Portmore , Douglas . Commonsense Consequentialism: Wherein Morality Meets Rationality Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 266. $74.00 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (1):179-183.
  3. Frances Howard-Snyder (2012). The Power of Logic. Mcgraw-Hill.
    Basic concepts -- Identifying arguments -- Logic and language -- Informal fallacies -- Categorical logic: statements -- Categorical logic: syllogisms -- Statement logic: truth tables -- Statement logic: proofs -- Predicate logic -- Induction -- Probability.
     
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  4. Frances Howard-Snyder (2011). A Puzzle About Hypocrisy. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion: Vol. 3 3:89.
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  5. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (2010). The Puzzle of Petitionary Prayer. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (2):43 - 68.
    The fact that our asking God to do something can make a difference to what he does underwrites the point of petitionary prayer. Here, however, a puzzle arises: Either doing what we ask is the best God can do or it is not. If it is, then our asking won’t make any difference to whether he does it. If it is not, then our asking won’t make any difference to whether he does it. So, our asking won’t make any difference (...)
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  6. Frances Howard-Snyder (2008). Damned If You Do; Damned If You Don't! Philosophia 36 (1):1-15.
    This paper discusses the Principle of Normative Invariance: ‘An action’s moral status does not depend on whether or not it is performed.’ I show the importance of this principle for arguments regarding actualism and other variations on the person-affecting restriction, discuss and rebut arguments in favor of the principle, and then discuss five counterexamples to it. I conclude that the principle as it stands is false; and that if it is modified to avoid the counterexamples, it is gutted of any (...)
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  7. Frances Howard-Snyder (2006). “Cannot” Implies “Not Ought”. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):233 - 246.
    I argue for a version of “ought” implies “can”. In particular, I argue that it is necessarily true that if an agent, S, ultima facie ought to do A at T’, then there is a time T* such that S can at T* do A at T’. In support of this principle, I have argued that without it, we cannot explain how it is that, in cases where agents cannot do the best thing, they often ought to do some alternative (...)
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  8. Frances Howard-snyder (2005). It's the Thought That Counts. Utilitas 17 (3):265-281.
    Agnes's brakes fail. Should she continue straight into the busy intersection or should she swerve into the field? Add to the story, what Agnes does not and cannot know, that continuing into the intersection will cause no harm, whereas swerving into the apparently empty field will cause a death. I evaluate arguments for the claim that she should enter the intersection, i.e. for objectivism about right and wrong; and arguments for the claim that she should swerve, i.e. for subjectivism about (...)
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  9. Frances Howard-Snyder (2005). On These Two Commandments Hang All the Law and the Prophets. Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):3-20.
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  10. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (199x). Review of Peter van Inwagen, God, Mystery, and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy:xxx.
    This volume collects nine essays published by Peter van Inwagen between 1977 and 1995. Part I features, among other things, modal skepticism with respect to ontological arguments and arguments from evil. Part II addresses certain tensions Christians may feel between modern biology, critical studies of the New Testament, and the comparative study of religions, on the one hand, and Christian orthodoxy, on the other. Part III deploys a formal logic of relative identity to model the internal consistency of the orthodox (...)
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  11. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (1999). Is Theism Compatible with Gratuitous Evil? American Philosophical Quarterly 36 (2):115 - 130.
    We argue that Michael Peterson's and William Hasker's attempts to show that God and gratuitous evil are compatible constitute miserable failures. We then sketch Peter van Inwagen's attempt to do the same and conclude that, to date, no one has shown his attempt a failure.
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  12. Frances Howard-Snyder (1999). Christianity and Ethics. In Michael Murray (ed.), Reason for the Hope Within. Eerdmans.
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  13. Frances Howard-Snyder (1999). Response to Carlson and Qizilbash. Utilitas 11 (01):106-111.
  14. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (1998). God, Knowledge, and Mystery. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy 15 (3):397-399.
    This is a review of Peter van Inwagen's collection of essays.
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  15. Frances Howard-Snyder & Daniel Howard-Snyder (1998). God, Knowledge & Mystery. Faith and Philosophy 15 (3):397-399.
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  16. Michael B. Burke, Hugh S. Chandler Roderick M. Chisholm, Frederick C. Doepke, Peter T. Geach, Allan Gibbard, Mark Heller, Frances Howard-Snyder, Peter van Inwagen, Mark Johnston, David Lewis, George Myro, Terence Parsons, Ernest Sosa, JudithJarvis Thomson, Peter Unger & David Wiggins (1997). Material Constitution: A Reader. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  17. Frances Howard-Snyder (1997). The Rejection of Objective Consequentialism. Utilitas 9 (02):241-248.
    Objective consequentialism is often criticized because it is impossible to know which of our actions will have the best consequences. Why exactly does this undermine objective consequentialism? I offer a new link between the claim that our knowledge of the future is limited and the rejection of objective consequentialism: that ‘ought’ implies ‘can’ and we cannot produce the best consequences available to us. I support this apparently paradoxical contention by way of an analogy. I cannot beat Karpov at chess in (...)
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  18. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (1996). The Real Problem of No Best World. Faith and Philosophy 13 (3):422-425.
    This is a reply to William Rowe, "The Problem of No Best World," Faith and Philosophy (1994).
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  19. Frances Howard-Snyder (1996). A New Argument for Consequentialism? A Reply to Sinnott-Armstrong. Analysis 56 (2):111–115.
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  20. Frances Howard-Snyder (1995). The Problem of Hell. Faith and Philosophy 12 (3):442-450.
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  21. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (1994). How an Unsurpassable Being Can Create a Surpassable World. Faith and Philosophy 11 (2):260-268.
    Imagine that there exists a good, essentially omniscient and omnipotent being named Jove, and that there exists nothing else. No possible being is more powerful or knowledgable. Out of his goodness, Jove decides to create. Since he is all-powerful, there is nothing but the bounds of possibility to prevent him from getting what he wants. Unfortunately, as he holds before his mind the host of worlds, Jove sees that for each there is a better one. Although he can create any (...)
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  22. Frances Howard-Snyder (1994). The Heart of Consequentialism. Philosophical Studies 76 (1):107 - 129.
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  23. Frances Howard-Snyder (1994). The Love Commandments. Faith and Philosophy 11 (3):500-507.
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  24. Daniel & Frances Howard-Snyder (1993). The Christian Theodicist's Appeal to Love. Religious Studies 29 (2):185.
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  25. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Frances Howard-Snyder (1993). The Christian Theodicist's Appeal to Love. Religious Studies 29 (2):185 - 192.
    Many Christian theodicists believe that God's creating us with the capacity to love Him and each other justifies, in large part, God's permitting evil. For example, after reminding us that, according to Christian doctrine, the supreme good for human beings is to enter into a reciprocal love relationship with God, Vincent Brummer recently wrote: In creating human persons in order to love them, God necessarily assumes vulnerability in relation to them. In fact, in this relation, he becomes even more vulnerable (...)
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  26. Frances Howard-Snyder (1993). Rule Consequentialism Is a Rubber Duck. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (3):271 - 278.
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  27. Frances Howard-Snyder & Alastair Norcross (1993). A Consequentialist Case for Rejecting the Right. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:109-125.
    Satisficing and maximizing versions of consequentialism have both assumed that rightness is an alI-or-nothing property. We argue thal this is inimical to the spirit of consequentialism, and that, from the point of view of the consequentialist, actions should be evaluated purely in terms that admit of degree. We first consider the suggestion that rightness and wrongness are a matter of degree. If so, this raises the question of whether the claim that something is wrong says any more than that it (...)
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  28. Frances Howard-Snyder (1992). Elbow-Room for Consequentialists. Analysis 52 (4):249 - 253.
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  29. Frances Howard-Snyder (1992). Is It Less Wrong to Harm the Vulnerable Than the Secure? Journal of Philosophy 89 (12):643-647.
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