Search results for 'Self in literature' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Joshua Landy (2004). Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical--in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art--and literary, in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent, Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Walter Bernhart & Werner Wolf (eds.) (2010). Self-Reference in Literature and Other Media. Rodopi.score: 115.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.score: 105.0
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Sarah Chaney (2011). “A Hideous Torture on Himself”: Madness and Self-Mutilation in Victorian Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):279-289.score: 99.0
    This paper suggests that late nineteenth-century definitions of self-mutilation, a new category of psychiatric symptomatology, were heavily influenced by the use of self-injury as a rhetorical device in the novel, for the literary text held a high status in Victorian psychology. In exploring Dimmesdale’s “self-mutilation” in The Scarlet Letter in conjunction with psychiatric case histories, the paper indicates a number of common techniques and themes in literary and psychiatric texts. As well as illuminating key elements of nineteenth-century (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christian Quendler (2001). From Romantic Irony to Postmodernist Metafiction: A Contribution to the History of Literary Self-Reflexivity in its Philosophical Context. P. Lang.score: 94.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Linda Marie Brooks (forthcoming). Alternative Identities: The Self in Literature. History, Theory.score: 90.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Carolyn D. Williams (1997). Another Self in Case" : Gender, Marriage, and the Individual in Augustan Literature. In Roy Porter (ed.), Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.score: 90.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Genevieve Lloyd (1993). Being in Time: Selves and Narrators in Philosophy and Literature. Routledge.score: 89.0
    Being in Time is a provocative and accessible essay on the fragmentation of the self as explored in philosophy and literature. This original study is unique in its focus on the literary aspects of philosophical writing and their interactions with philosophical content. It explores the emotional aspects of the human experience of time commonly neglected in philosophical investigation by looking at how narrative creates and treats the experience of the self as fragmented and the past as "lost." (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Javier Saavedra Macías & Rafael Velez Núñez (2011). The Other Self: Psychopathology and Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):257-267.score: 89.0
    The figure of the “double” or the other self is an important topic in the history of literature. Many centuries before Jean Paul Richter coined the term, “doppelgänger,” at the beginning of the Romantic Movement in the year 1796, it is possible to find the figure of the double in myths and legends. The issue of the double emphaszses the contradictory character of the human being and invokes a sinister dimension of the psychological world, what has been called (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Shadi Bartsch (2005). Ancient Depression P. Toohey: Melancholy, Love, and Time. Boundaries of the Self in Ancient Literature . Pp. X + 386, Ills. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2004. Cased, US$70, £44. ISBN: 0-472-11302-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):498-.score: 87.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Moshe Idel (2010). The Camouflaged Sacred in Mircea Eliade's Self-Perception, Literature, and Scholarship. In Christian K. Wedemeyer & Wendy Doniger (eds.), Hermeneutics, Politics, and the History of Religions: The Contested Legacies of Joachim Wach and Mircea Eliade. Oxford University Press.score: 87.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John R. Reed (1988). The Victorian Renaissance Self in The Renaissance in Victorian Literature. Clio 17 (2):187-208.score: 87.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Irven Resnick (2006). Ineke Van't Spijker, Fictions of the Inner Life: Religious Literature and Formation of the Self in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. (Disputatio, 4.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2004. Pp. Ix, 264. €60. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):285-286.score: 87.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Tim Whitmarsh (2005). Melancholy, Love, and Time: Boundaries of the Self in Ancient Literature. American Journal of Philology 126 (2):281-294.score: 87.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Laura Inez Deavenport Barge (2009). Exploring Worldviews in Literature: From William Wordsworth to Edward Albee. Abilene Christian University Press.score: 84.0
    Numinous spaces in British literature from William Wordsworth to Samuel Beckett -- Jesus figures in American literature from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Edward Albee -- Using Bakhtin's definitions to discover ethical voices in Solzhenitsyn and Tolstoy -- René Girard's categories of scapegoats in literature of the American South -- Hopkins's metaphysics of nature as sacred disclosure -- The book of job as mirrored in Hopkins's metaphysics -- Beckett's mythos of the absence of God.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Roy Porter (ed.) (1997). Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.score: 81.0
    Rewriting the Self is an exploration of ideas of the self in the western cultural tradition from the Renaissance to the present. The contributors analyze different religious, philosophical, psychological, political, psychoanalytical and literary models of personal identity from a number of viewpoints, including the history of ideas, contemporary gender politics, and post-modernist literary theory. Challenging the received version of the "ascent of western man," they assess the discursive construction of the self in the light of political, technological (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. H. C. Baldry (1968). Sophrosyne Helen North: Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, Xxxv.) Pp. Xx+391. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1966. Cloth, 80s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (02):192-194.score: 81.0
  18. Aj Argyros (1989). From Passion to Self-Reflexivity. A Holistic Approach to Consciousness and Literature in The Elemental Passions of the Soul. Poetics of the Elements in the Human Conditions: Part 3. [REVIEW] Analecta Husserliana 28:617-626.score: 81.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. J. Kemp & Helen North (1968). Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):359.score: 81.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dominic J. O'Meara (1997). Paul A. Olson, The Journey to Wisdom: Self-Education in Patristic and Medieval Literature. Lincoln, Nebr., and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1995. Pp. Xxi, 297. $40. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (4):1205-1206.score: 81.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Yasmin Syed (1997). Creating Roman Identity: Subjectivity and Self-Fashioning in Latin Literature The 1995 Berkeley Conference. Classical Antiquity 16 (1).score: 81.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei (2011). Exotic Spaces in German Modernism. Oxford University Press.score: 79.0
    Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei demonstrates that the exotic, as reflected in major works of German literature and in the philosophy and art that inspires it, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Blakey Vermeule (2000). The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 79.0
    What is the relationship between the self and society? Where do moral judgments come from? As Blakey Vermeule demonstrates in The Party of Humanity, such questions about sociability and moral philosophy were central to eighteenth-century writers and artists. Vermeule focuses on a group of aesthetically complicated moral texts: Alexander Pope's character sketches and Dunciad , Samuel Johnson's Life of Savage, and David Hume's self-consciously theatrical writings on pride and his autobiographical writings on religious melancholia. These writers and their (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 78.0
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue in (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Andreea Tereza Nitisor (2010). Speaking the Despicable: Blasphemy in Literature. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (16):69-79.score: 77.0
    This article examines the controversial issue of blasphemy in literature from the viewpoint of reception inside and outside the academia. The thesis of the article is that blasphemy in literature, though inherently related to religion and language, has a plurality of connotations and interpretations (dissidence, intertextuality, critique of colonialism, discursive strategy, alterity/Otherness, ethnicity, subversive text). Consequently, blasphemy in literature is an incentive for fruitful discussions regarding tolerance, freedom of expression, and the re-situation of the (post)modern self (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Catherine Osborne (2007/2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Hsuan L. Hsu (2010). Geography and the Production of Space in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Cambridge University Press.score: 76.0
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgments; Introduction: scales of identification; 1. Democratic expansionism, gothic geographies, and Charles Brockden Brown; 2. Urban apartments, global cities: the enlargement of private space in Poe and James; 3. Cultural orphans: domesticity, missionaries, and China from Stowe to Sui Sin Far; 4. 'The Checkered Globe': cosmopolitan despair in the American Pacific; 5. Literature and regional production; Epilogue: scales of resistance.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Marina Frasca-Spada (1998). Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise. Cambridge University Press.score: 75.0
    Hume's discussion of the idea of space in his Treatise on Human Nature is fundamental to an understanding of his treatment of such central issues as the existence of external objects, the unity of the self, the relation between certainty and belief, and abstract ideas. Marina Frasca-Spada's rich and original study examines this difficult part of Hume's philosophical writings and connects it to eighteenth-century works in natural philosophy, mathematics and literature. Focusing on Hume's discussions of the infinite divisibility (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Brett Bourbon (2004). Finding a Replacement for the Soul: Mind and Meaning in Literature and Philosophy. Harvard University Press.score: 73.0
    Approaching the study of literature as a unique form of the philosophy of language and mind--as a study of how we produce nonsense and imagine it as sense--this ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Phyllis Carey (ed.) (1997). Wagering on Transcendence: The Search for Meaning in Literature. Sheed & Ward.score: 73.0
    Through essays, Mount Mary College professors from various disciplines analyze several pieces of literature from a variety of genres and authors to show how ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Walter Pape & Frederick Burwick (eds.) (1995). Reflecting Senses: Perception and Appearance in Literature, Culture, and the Arts. W. De Gruyter.score: 73.0
    Introduction In "search of instances where the American imagination demands the real thing, and, to attain it, must fabricate the absolute fake," Umberto ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Margaret S. Hrezo & John M. Parrish (eds.) (2010). Damned If You Do: Dilemmas of Action in Literature and Popular Culture. Lexington Books.score: 73.0
    These essays showcase the value of the narrative arts in investigating complex conflicts of value in moral and political life, and explore the philosophical problem of moral dilemmas as expressed in ancient drama, classic and contemporary ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert Schroer (2013). Reductionism in Personal Identity and the Phenomenological Sense of Being a Temporally Extended Self. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):339-356.score: 72.0
    The special and unique attitudes that we take towards events in our futures/pasts—e.g., attitudes like the dread of an impeding pain—create a challenge for “Reductionist” accounts that reduce persons to aggregates of interconnected person stages: if the person stage currently dreading tomorrow’s pain is numerically distinct from the person stage that will actually suffer the pain, what reason could the current person stage have for thinking of that future pain as being his? One reason everyday subjects believe they have a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Miriam Kyselo (2013). Locked-in Syndrome and BCI - Towards an Enactive Approach to the Self. Neuroethics 6 (3):579-591.score: 72.0
    It has been argued that Extended Cognition (EXT), a recently much discussed framework in the philosophy of cognition, would serve as the theoretical basis to account for the impact of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) on the self and life of patients with Locked-in Syndrome (LIS). In this paper I will argue that this claim is unsubstantiated, EXT is not the appropriate theoretical background for understanding the role of BCI in LIS. I will critically assess what a theory of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Aaron L. Mishara (2010). Kafka, Paranoic Doubles and the Brain: Hypnagogic Vs. Hyper-Reflexive Models of Disrupted Self in Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Anomalous Conscious States. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):13.score: 72.0
    Kafka's writings are frequently interpreted as representing the historical period of modernism in which he was writing. Little attention has been paid, however, to the possibility that his writings may reflect neural mechanisms in the processing of self during hypnagogic (i.e., between waking and sleep) states. Kafka suffered from dream-like, hypnagogic hallucinations during a sleep-deprived state while writing. This paper discusses reasons (phenomenological and neurobiological) why the self projects an imaginary double (autoscopy) in its spontaneous hallucinations and how (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jennifer Ann Bates (2010). Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination. State University of New York Press.score: 72.0
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Chad R. Galley (2007). Gravitational Self-Force From Quantized Linear Metric Perturbations in Curved Space. Foundations of Physics 37 (4-5):460-479.score: 72.0
    We present a formal derivation of the Mino–Sasaki–Tanaka–Quinn–Wald (MSTQW) equation describing the self-force on a (semi-) classical relativistic point mass moving under the influence of quantized linear metric perturbations on a curved background space–time. The curvature of the space–time implies that the dynamics of the particle and the field is history-dependent and as such requires a non-equilibrium formalism to ensure the consistent evolution of both particle and field, viz., the worldline influence functional and the closed- time-path (CTP) coarse-grained effective (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Christopher Castiglia (2008). Interior States: Institutional Consciousness and the Inner Life of Democracy in the Antebellum United States. Duke University Press.score: 72.0
    "This book combines scope and depth in a way that will remind readers of some of the classics--F. O. Matthiessen, Leo Marx, Ann Douglas, Jane Tompkins.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli Judson A. Brewer, Kathleen A. Garrison (2013). What About the “Self” is Processed in the Posterior Cingulate Cortex? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 72.0
    In the past decade, neuroimaging research has begun to identify key brain regions involved in self-referential processing, most consistently midline structures such as the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). The majority of studies have employed cognitive tasks such as judgment about trait adjectives or mind-wandering, that have been associated with increased PCC activity. Conversely, tasks that share an element of present centered attention (being “on task”), ranging from working memory to meditation, have been associated with decreased PCC activity. Given the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ayna Baladi Nejad, Philippe Fossati & Cédric Lemogne (2013). Self-Referential Processing, Rumination, and Cortical Midline Structures in Major Depression. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 72.0
    Major depression is associated with a bias towards negative emotional processing and increased self-focus, i.e. the process by which one engages in self-referential processing. The increased self-focus in depression is suggested to be of a persistent, repetitive and self-critical nature and is conceptualised as ruminative brooding. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in self-referential processing has been previously emphasised in acute major depression. There is increasing evidence that self-referential processing as well as the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Rosa Slegers (2010). Courageous Vulnerability: Ethics and Knowledge in Proust, Bergson, Marcel, and James. Brill.score: 70.0
    This work develops the ethical attitude of courageous vulnerability through the integration of the phenomenon of involuntary memory in Marcel Proust's work and ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Ullrich Langer (1994). Perfect Friendship: Studies in Literature and Moral Philosophy From Boccaccio to Corneille. Librairie Droz.score: 70.0
    I am grateful to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a year-long fellowship that enabled me to write major portions of this book; ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. P. Rochat (ed.) (1995). The Self in Infancy: Theory and Research. Elsevier.score: 70.0
    This book is a collection of current theoretical views and research on the self in early infancy, prior to self-identification and the well-documented emergence ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Julian Lenhart[from old catalog] Ross (1950). Philosophy in Literature. Thought 25 (1):141-142.score: 70.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Angus Fletcher (1991). Colors of the Mind: Conjectures on Thinking in Literature. Harvard University Press.score: 70.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Josef Früchtl (2009). The Impertinent Self: A Heroic History of Modernity and Film. Stanford University Press.score: 70.0
    Introduction : heroes like us -- Hegel, the western and classical modernity -- The myth and the frontier -- The hero in the epochs of mythical and the bourgeois -- The end of the individual -- The end of the subject -- Romanticism, crime and agonal modernity -- The return of tragedy in modernity -- Heroes of coolness and the ironist -- Nietzsche, science fiction and hybrid modernity -- Heroic individualismus and metaphysics -- Superhumans, supermen, cyborgs -- Heroes of the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Josef Früchtl (2009). The Impertinent Self: A Heroic History of Modernity. Stanford University Press.score: 70.0
    Hegel, the western and classical modernity. The myth and the frontier ; The hero in the epochs of mythical and the bourgeois ; The end of the individual ; The end of the subject -- Romanticism, crime and agonal modernity. The return of tragedy in modernity ; Heroes of coolness and the ironist -- Nietzsche, science fiction and hybrid modernity. Heroic individualismus and metaphysics ; Superhumans, supermen, cyborgs ; Heroes of the future.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Patrick Grant (1996). Personalism and the Politics of Culture: Readings in Literature and Religion From the New Testament to the Poetry of Northern Ireland. St. Martin's Press.score: 70.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Simon Haines (2005). Poetry and Philosophy From Homer to Rousseau: Romantic Souls, Realist Lives. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 70.0
    This book features readings of over twenty key texts and authors in Western poetry and philosophy, including Homer, Plato, Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare and Rousseau. Simon Haines argues that the history of both can be seen as a struggle between two different conceptions of the self: the "romantic" vs. the "realist".
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Konstantin Kolenda (1982). Philosophy in Literature: Metaphysical Darkness and Ethical Light. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 70.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000