Search results for 'Self in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joshua Landy (2004). Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust. Oxford University Press.score: 378.0
    Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical--in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art--and literary, in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent, Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should (...)
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  2. Walter Bernhart & Werner Wolf (eds.) (2010). Self-Reference in Literature and Other Media. Rodopi.score: 345.0
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  3. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.score: 315.0
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological and (...)
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  4. Sarah Chaney (2011). “A Hideous Torture on Himself”: Madness and Self-Mutilation in Victorian Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):279-289.score: 297.0
    This paper suggests that late nineteenth-century definitions of self-mutilation, a new category of psychiatric symptomatology, were heavily influenced by the use of self-injury as a rhetorical device in the novel, for the literary text held a high status in Victorian psychology. In exploring Dimmesdale’s “self-mutilation” in The Scarlet Letter in conjunction with psychiatric case histories, the paper indicates a number of common techniques and themes in literary and psychiatric texts. As well as illuminating key elements of nineteenth-century (...)
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  5. Christian Quendler (2001). From Romantic Irony to Postmodernist Metafiction: A Contribution to the History of Literary Self-Reflexivity in its Philosophical Context. P. Lang.score: 282.0
     
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  6. Linda Marie Brooks (forthcoming). Alternative Identities: The Self in Literature. History, Theory.score: 270.0
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  7. Carolyn D. Williams (1997). Another Self in Case" : Gender, Marriage, and the Individual in Augustan Literature. In Roy Porter (ed.), Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.score: 270.0
     
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  8. Genevieve Lloyd (1993). Being in Time: Selves and Narrators in Philosophy and Literature. Routledge.score: 267.0
    Being in Time is a provocative and accessible essay on the fragmentation of the self as explored in philosophy and literature. This original study is unique in its focus on the literary aspects of philosophical writing and their interactions with philosophical content. It explores the emotional aspects of the human experience of time commonly neglected in philosophical investigation by looking at how narrative creates and treats the experience of the self as fragmented and the past as "lost." (...)
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  9. Javier Saavedra Macías & Rafael Velez Núñez (2011). The Other Self: Psychopathology and Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):257-267.score: 267.0
    The figure of the “double” or the other self is an important topic in the history of literature. Many centuries before Jean Paul Richter coined the term, “doppelgänger,” at the beginning of the Romantic Movement in the year 1796, it is possible to find the figure of the double in myths and legends. The issue of the double emphaszses the contradictory character of the human being and invokes a sinister dimension of the psychological world, what has been called (...)
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  10. Shadi Bartsch (2005). Ancient Depression P. Toohey: Melancholy, Love, and Time. Boundaries of the Self in Ancient Literature . Pp. X + 386, Ills. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2004. Cased, US$70, £44. ISBN: 0-472-11302-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):498-.score: 261.0
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  11. Moshe Idel (2010). The Camouflaged Sacred in Mircea Eliade's Self-Perception, Literature, and Scholarship. In Christian K. Wedemeyer & Wendy Doniger (eds.), Hermeneutics, Politics, and the History of Religions: The Contested Legacies of Joachim Wach and Mircea Eliade. Oxford University Press.score: 261.0
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  12. John R. Reed (1988). The Victorian Renaissance Self in The Renaissance in Victorian Literature. Clio 17 (2):187-208.score: 261.0
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  13. Irven Resnick (2006). Ineke Van't Spijker, Fictions of the Inner Life: Religious Literature and Formation of the Self in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. (Disputatio, 4.) Turnhout: Brepols, 2004. Pp. Ix, 264. €60. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):285-286.score: 261.0
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  14. Tim Whitmarsh (2005). Melancholy, Love, and Time: Boundaries of the Self in Ancient Literature. American Journal of Philology 126 (2):281-294.score: 261.0
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  15. Roy Porter (ed.) (1997). Rewriting the Self: Histories From the Renaissance to the Present. Routledge.score: 243.0
    Rewriting the Self is an exploration of ideas of the self in the western cultural tradition from the Renaissance to the present. The contributors analyze different religious, philosophical, psychological, political, psychoanalytical and literary models of personal identity from a number of viewpoints, including the history of ideas, contemporary gender politics, and post-modernist literary theory. Challenging the received version of the "ascent of western man," they assess the discursive construction of the self in the light of political, technological (...)
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  16. H. C. Baldry (1968). Sophrosyne Helen North: Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, Xxxv.) Pp. Xx+391. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1966. Cloth, 80s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (02):192-194.score: 243.0
  17. Aj Argyros (1989). From Passion to Self-Reflexivity. A Holistic Approach to Consciousness and Literature in The Elemental Passions of the Soul. Poetics of the Elements in the Human Conditions: Part 3. [REVIEW] Analecta Husserliana 28:617-626.score: 243.0
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  18. J. Kemp & Helen North (1968). Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):359.score: 243.0
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  19. Dominic J. O'Meara (1997). Paul A. Olson, The Journey to Wisdom: Self-Education in Patristic and Medieval Literature. Lincoln, Nebr., and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1995. Pp. Xxi, 297. $40. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (4):1205-1206.score: 243.0
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  20. Yasmin Syed (1997). Creating Roman Identity: Subjectivity and Self-Fashioning in Latin Literature The 1995 Berkeley Conference. Classical Antiquity 16 (1).score: 243.0
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  21. Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei (2011). Exotic Spaces in German Modernism. Oxford University Press.score: 237.0
    Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei demonstrates that the exotic, as reflected in major works of German literature and in the philosophy and art that inspires it, ...
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  22. Blakey Vermeule (2000). The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 237.0
    What is the relationship between the self and society? Where do moral judgments come from? As Blakey Vermeule demonstrates in The Party of Humanity, such questions about sociability and moral philosophy were central to eighteenth-century writers and artists. Vermeule focuses on a group of aesthetically complicated moral texts: Alexander Pope's character sketches and Dunciad , Samuel Johnson's Life of Savage, and David Hume's self-consciously theatrical writings on pride and his autobiographical writings on religious melancholia. These writers and their (...)
     
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  23. Andreea Tereza Nitisor (2010). Speaking the Despicable: Blasphemy in Literature. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (16):69-79.score: 231.0
    This article examines the controversial issue of blasphemy in literature from the viewpoint of reception inside and outside the academia. The thesis of the article is that blasphemy in literature, though inherently related to religion and language, has a plurality of connotations and interpretations (dissidence, intertextuality, critique of colonialism, discursive strategy, alterity/Otherness, ethnicity, subversive text). Consequently, blasphemy in literature is an incentive for fruitful discussions regarding tolerance, freedom of expression, and the re-situation of the (post)modern self (...)
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  24. Marina Frasca-Spada (1998). Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise. Cambridge University Press.score: 225.0
    Hume's discussion of the idea of space in his Treatise on Human Nature is fundamental to an understanding of his treatment of such central issues as the existence of external objects, the unity of the self, the relation between certainty and belief, and abstract ideas. Marina Frasca-Spada's rich and original study examines this difficult part of Hume's philosophical writings and connects it to eighteenth-century works in natural philosophy, mathematics and literature. Focusing on Hume's discussions of the infinite divisibility (...)
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  25. Aaron L. Mishara (2010). Kafka, Paranoic Doubles and the Brain: Hypnagogic Vs. Hyper-Reflexive Models of Disrupted Self in Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Anomalous Conscious States. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):13.score: 216.0
    Kafka's writings are frequently interpreted as representing the historical period of modernism in which he was writing. Little attention has been paid, however, to the possibility that his writings may reflect neural mechanisms in the processing of self during hypnagogic (i.e., between waking and sleep) states. Kafka suffered from dream-like, hypnagogic hallucinations during a sleep-deprived state while writing. This paper discusses reasons (phenomenological and neurobiological) why the self projects an imaginary double (autoscopy) in its spontaneous hallucinations and how (...)
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  26. Jennifer Ann Bates (2010). Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination. State University of New York Press.score: 216.0
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
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  27. Christopher Castiglia (2008). Interior States: Institutional Consciousness and the Inner Life of Democracy in the Antebellum United States. Duke University Press.score: 216.0
    "This book combines scope and depth in a way that will remind readers of some of the classics--F. O. Matthiessen, Leo Marx, Ann Douglas, Jane Tompkins.
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  28. Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli Judson A. Brewer, Kathleen A. Garrison (2013). What About the “Self” is Processed in the Posterior Cingulate Cortex? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 216.0
    In the past decade, neuroimaging research has begun to identify key brain regions involved in self-referential processing, most consistently midline structures such as the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). The majority of studies have employed cognitive tasks such as judgment about trait adjectives or mind-wandering, that have been associated with increased PCC activity. Conversely, tasks that share an element of present centered attention (being “on task”), ranging from working memory to meditation, have been associated with decreased PCC activity. Given the (...)
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  29. Ayna Baladi Nejad, Philippe Fossati & Cédric Lemogne (2013). Self-Referential Processing, Rumination, and Cortical Midline Structures in Major Depression. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 216.0
    Major depression is associated with a bias towards negative emotional processing and increased self-focus, i.e. the process by which one engages in self-referential processing. The increased self-focus in depression is suggested to be of a persistent, repetitive and self-critical nature and is conceptualised as ruminative brooding. The role of the medial prefrontal cortex in self-referential processing has been previously emphasised in acute major depression. There is increasing evidence that self-referential processing as well as the (...)
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  30. Rosa Slegers (2010). Courageous Vulnerability: Ethics and Knowledge in Proust, Bergson, Marcel, and James. Brill.score: 210.0
    This work develops the ethical attitude of courageous vulnerability through the integration of the phenomenon of involuntary memory in Marcel Proust's work and ...
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  31. Josef Früchtl (2009). The Impertinent Self: A Heroic History of Modernity and Film. Stanford University Press.score: 210.0
    Introduction : heroes like us -- Hegel, the western and classical modernity -- The myth and the frontier -- The hero in the epochs of mythical and the bourgeois -- The end of the individual -- The end of the subject -- Romanticism, crime and agonal modernity -- The return of tragedy in modernity -- Heroes of coolness and the ironist -- Nietzsche, science fiction and hybrid modernity -- Heroic individualismus and metaphysics -- Superhumans, supermen, cyborgs -- Heroes of the (...)
     
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  32. Josef Früchtl (2009). The Impertinent Self: A Heroic History of Modernity. Stanford University Press.score: 210.0
    Hegel, the western and classical modernity. The myth and the frontier ; The hero in the epochs of mythical and the bourgeois ; The end of the individual ; The end of the subject -- Romanticism, crime and agonal modernity. The return of tragedy in modernity ; Heroes of coolness and the ironist -- Nietzsche, science fiction and hybrid modernity. Heroic individualismus and metaphysics ; Superhumans, supermen, cyborgs ; Heroes of the future.
     
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  33. Simon Haines (2005). Poetry and Philosophy From Homer to Rousseau: Romantic Souls, Realist Lives. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 210.0
    This book features readings of over twenty key texts and authors in Western poetry and philosophy, including Homer, Plato, Dante, Chaucer, Shakespeare and Rousseau. Simon Haines argues that the history of both can be seen as a struggle between two different conceptions of the self: the "romantic" vs. the "realist".
     
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  34. Susan Margaret Hart (2010). Self-Regulation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Business Case: Do They Work in Achieving Workplace Equality and Safety? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):585 - 600.score: 207.0
    The political shift toward an economic liberalism in many developed market economies, emphasizing the importance of the marketplace rather than government intervention in the economy and society (Dorman, Systematic Occupational Health and Safety Management: Perspectives on an International Development, 2000; Tombs, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 3(1): 24-25, 2005; Walters, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 03(2):3-19, 2005), featured a prominent discourse centered on the need for business flexibility and competitiveness in a global economy (Dorman, 2000; Tombs, (...)
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  35. Raymond Martin (1998). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival. Cambridge University Press.score: 207.0
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity, and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a (...)
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  36. Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O'Mathúna & P. Anne Scott (2012). Patient Autonomy and Choice in Healthcare: Self-Testing Devices as a Case in Point. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.score: 207.0
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that (...)-testing provides a specific example how increased patient autonomy and choice within healthcare might not best serve the patient population. We propose that current interpretations of autonomy in healthcare are based on negative accounts of liberty to the detriment of a more relational understanding. We also propose that Kantian philosophy is often applied to the healthcare arena in an inappropriate manner. We draw on the philosophical literature and examples from the self-testing process to support these claims. We conclude by offering an alternative account of autonomy based on the interrelated concepts of relationality, care and responsibility. (shrink)
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  37. Cristina Bicchieri & Hugo Mercier (2013). Self-Serving Biases and Public Justifications in Trust Games. Synthese 190 (5):909-922.score: 207.0
    Often, when several norms are present and may be in conflict, individuals will display a self-serving bias, privileging the norm that best serves their interests. Xiao and Bicchieri (J Econ Psychol 31(3):456–470, 2010) tested the effects of inequality on reciprocating behavior in trust games and showed that—when inequality increases—reciprocity loses its appeal. They hypothesized that self-serving biases in choosing to privilege a particular social norm occur when the choice of that norm is publicly justifiable as reasonable, even if (...)
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  38. Matthias Fink, Rainer Harms & Isabella Hatak (2012). Nanotechnology and Ethics: The Role of Regulation Versus Self-Commitment in Shaping Researchers' Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):569-581.score: 207.0
    The governance of nanotechnology seeks to limit its risks, without constraining opportunities. The literature on the effectiveness of approaches to governance has neglected approaches that impact directly on the behavior of a researcher. We analyze the effectiveness of legal regulations versus regulation via self-commitment. Then, we refine this model by analyzing competition and autonomy as key contingency factors. In the first step, qualitative interviews with nanotechnology researchers are conducted to reflect this model. In the second step, its empirical (...)
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  39. Patrick Crowley, Noreen Humble & Silvia M. Ross (eds.) (2011). Mediterranean Travels: Writing Self and Other From the Ancient World to Contemporary Society. Legenda/ Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Publishing.score: 207.0
     
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  40. Anna Budziak (2008). Text, Body and Indeterminacy: The Doppelgänger Selves in Pater and Wilde. Cambridge Scholars.score: 201.0
     
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  41. Jean-Jacques Defert, Trevor Tchir & Dan Webb (eds.) (2008). Declensions of the Self: A Bestiary of Modernity. Cambridge Scholars Pub..score: 201.0
     
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  42. Rebecca Elliott Erdem Pulcu, Roland Zahn (2013). The Role of Self-Blaming Moral Emotions in Major Depression and Their Impact on Social-Economical Decision Making. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 198.0
    People with major depressive disorder (MDD) are more prone to experiencing moral emotions related to self-blame, such as guilt and shame. DSM-IV-TR recognises excessive or inappropriate guilt as one of the core symptoms of current MDD, whereas excessive shame is not part of the criteria for MDD. However, previous studies specifically assessing shame suggested its involvement in MDD. In the first part of this review, we will consider literature discussing the role of self-blaming moral emotions in MDD. (...)
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  43. Sabine Maasen (2007). Selves in Turmoil - Neurocognitive and Societal Challenges of the Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1-2):252-270.score: 195.0
    As the cognitive neurosciences set out to challenge our understanding of consciousness, the existing conceptual panoply of meanings attached to the term remains largely unaccounted for. By way of bibliometric analysis, the following study first reveals the breadth and shift of meanings over the last decades, the main tendency being a more 'brainy' concept of consciousness. On this basis, the emergence of consciousness studies is regarded as a 'trading zone' (Galison) in which experimental, philosophical and experiential accounts are dialectically engaged. (...)
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  44. Peter Dayan (2010). Medial Self-Reference Between Words and Music in Erik Satie's Piano Pieces. In Walter Bernhart & Werner Wolf (eds.), Self-Reference in Literature and Other Media. Rodopi.score: 195.0
     
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  45. Michael Halliwell (2010). The Play's the Thing' : Self- and Metareference in Contemporary Operatic Adaptation of Twentieth-Century Drama. In Walter Bernhart & Werner Wolf (eds.), Self-Reference in Literature and Other Media. Rodopi.score: 195.0
     
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  46. Simon Williams (2010). Robert Carsen's Production of Les Contes d'Hoffmann : An Exercise in Theatrical Self-Reflection. In Walter Bernhart & Werner Wolf (eds.), Self-Reference in Literature and Other Media. Rodopi.score: 195.0
     
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  47. Martha Craven Nussbaum (1990). Love's Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    This volume brings together Nussbaum's published papers on the relationship between literature and philosophy, especially moral philosophy. The papers, many of them previously inaccessible to non-specialist readers, explore such fundamental issues as the relationship between style and content in the exploration of ethical issues; the nature of ethical attention and ethical knowledge and their relationship to written forms and styles; and the role of the emotions in deliberation and self-knowledge. Nussbaum investigates and defends a conception of ethical understanding (...)
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  48. Albrecht Classen (ed.) (2010). Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences. Walter de Gruyter.score: 192.0
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's laughter and gender politics (...)
     
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  49. Alessandro Monti, Marina Goglio & Esterino Adami (eds.) (2005). Feeding the Self, Feeling the Way in Ancient and Contemporary South Asian Cultures. L'harmattan Italia.score: 192.0
     
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  50. Chandra Sekhar Sripada (2010). The Deep Self Model and Asymmetries in Folk Judgments About Intentional Action. Philosophical Studies 151 (2):159-176.score: 189.0
    Recent studies by experimental philosophers demonstrate puzzling asymmetries in people’s judgments about intentional action, leading many philosophers to propose that normative factors are inappropriately influencing intentionality judgments. In this paper, I present and defend the Deep Self Model of judgments about intentional action that provides a quite different explanation for these judgment asymmetries. The Deep Self Model is based on the idea that people make an intuitive distinction between two parts of an agent’s psychology, an Acting Self (...)
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