Search results for 'Social change' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Social Change (2006). University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law and Social Change. Philosophy 9.score: 1740.0
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  2. Molly Anne Rothenberg (2010). Excessive Subject: A New Theory of Social Change. Polity Press.score: 240.0
    In The Excessive Subject: A New Theory of Social Change, Molly Anne Rothenberg uncovers an innovative theory of social change implicit in the writings of radical social theorists, such as Pierre Bourdieu, Michel de Certeau, Judith Butler, Ernesto Laclau, and Slavoj ?i?ek. Through case studies of these writers' work, Rothenberg illuminates how this new theory calls into question currently accepted views of social practices, subject formation, democratic interaction, hegemony, political solidarity, revolutionary acts, and the (...)
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  3. Eduardo Giannetti Fonsecdaa (1991). Beliefs in Action: Economic Philosophy and Social Change. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    This book is concerned with the role of economic philosophy ("ideas") in the processes of belief-formation and social change. Its aim is to further our understanding of the behavior of the individual economic agent by bringing to light and examining the function of non-rational dispositions and motivations ("passions") in the determination of the agent's beliefs and goals. Drawing on the work of David Hume and Adam Smith, the book spells out the particular ways in which the passions come (...)
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  4. Muhammed Haron (2014). South[Ern] Africa's Dar Ul-'Ulums: Institutions of Social Change for the Common Good? Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (3):251-266.score: 240.0
    Muslim communities in principally non-Muslim nation states (e.g. South Africa, United States of America, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands) established a plethora of Muslim theological institutions. They have done so with the purpose of educating and reinforcing their Muslim identity. These educational structures have given rise to numerous questions that one encounters as one explores the rationale for their formation. Some are: have these institutions contributed towards the growth of Muslim extremism as argued by American and European Think Tanks? (...)
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  5. Roxana Havrici (2010). Gerrie ter Haar Oi James J. Busuttil (Eds.), The Freedom to Do God's Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):244-245.score: 240.0
    Gerrie ter Haar oi James J. Busuttil (eds.), The Freedom to Do God’s Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change Routledge, London and New York, 2003.
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  6. Michael S. Carolan (2006). Social Change and the Adoption and Adaptation of Knowledge Claims: Whose Truth Do You Trust in Regard to Sustainable Agriculture? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):325-339.score: 240.0
    This paper examines sustainable agriculture’s steady rise as a legitimate farm management system. In doing this, it offers an account of social change that centers on trust and its intersection with networks of knowledge. The argument to follow is informed by the works of Foucault and Latour but moves beyond this literature in important ways. Guided by and building upon earlier conceptual framework first forwarded by Carolan and Bell (2003, Environmental Values 12: 225–245), sustainable agriculture is examined through (...)
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  7. Malia Villegas, Theresa Kathleen Sullivan, Shai Fuxman & Marit Dewhurst (2007). Re-Envisioning Research as Social Change: Four Students' Collaborative Journey. Journal of Research Practice 3 (1):Article M7.score: 240.0
    This article describes four doctoral students' process of coming together to support each other's work. What emerged was a powerful space of learning and a framework on research for social change. The authors hosted a 2-hour reflection session, which was recorded and transcribed. Text of that session appears in this article along with discussion of (a) key principles of the social change framework, (b) the ways the students came to take ownership over their work and to (...)
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  8. Aline H. Kalbian (2014). Narrative Quests and Social Change. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (1):146-155.score: 234.0
    In this response to Christian Smith's What Is a Person?, I raise questions about his conception of the human life as a narrative quest and his account of change in social structures and institutions. The metaphor of life as a quest suggests a solid, isolated, and integrated moral agent. I wonder whether the experiences of most moral agents render a different picture—one where life is fragmented and characterized by complex webs of relationships. Smith provides a detailed account of (...)
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  9. Max H. Kirsch (2000). Queer Theory and Social Change. Routledge.score: 216.0
    The emergence of queer theory represents a huge leap in our understanding of lesbian and gay peoples. It embodies a context for treating these people as worthy of consideration in their own rights and not as an appendage to general cultural theory. Max Kirsch argues that the current development of this area is in danger of repeating past mistakes in the construction of analyses, and ultimately, social movements. In this way, the book presents an alternative to the current fascination (...)
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  10. Suzan Ilcan & Anita Lacey (2013). Networks of Social Justice: Transnational Activism and Social Change. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):1-6.score: 216.0
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  11. Adriana M. Manago & Patricia M. Greenfield (2011). The Construction of Independent Values Among Maya Women at the Forefront of Social Change: Four Case Studies. Ethos 39 (1):1-29.score: 210.0
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  12. Isidora Jaric (2002). Synchronicity of Social Change and the Construct of Gender Roles: Traditionalism and Modernity as Contents of Mainstream Model of Female Gender Roles in Women's Magazines During the Last Quarter of 20. Filozofija I Društvo 19:267-278.score: 210.0
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  13. Bernard Barber (ed.) (1978). Medical Ethics and Social Change. American Academy of Political and Social Science.score: 210.0
     
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  14. Oliva Blanchette (1973). For a Fundamental Social Ethic: A Philosophy of Social Change. New York,Philosophical Library.score: 210.0
     
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  15. David Michael Kleinberg-Levin (1989). The Listening Self: Personal Growth, Social Change, and the Closure of Metaphysics. Routledge.score: 210.0
     
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  16. Charles Edward Merriam (1936/1983). The Role of Politics in Social Change. Greenwood Press.score: 210.0
     
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  17. Ajnesh Prasad & Albert J. Mills (2010). Fertilizing the Ground for Social Change: Some Promising Ideas Into Critically Approaching Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):223 - 225.score: 210.0
    In this note, we briefly explain how this special issue on critical management studies and business ethics unfolded and discuss its underlying rationale. We then summarize each of the articles that were accepted for publication in the special issue. We ultimately hope that this collection of articles will initiate greater interest in studying business ethics from critically informed perspectives.
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  18. Ronald H. Preston (1979). Religion and the Persistence of Capitalism: The Maurice Lectures for 1977 and Other Studies in Christianity and Social Change. Scm Press.score: 210.0
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  19. Dawud G. Rosser-Owen (1976). Social Change in Islam: The Progressive Dimension. Open Press.score: 210.0
     
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  20. R. Sundara Rajan (1986). Innovative Competence and Social Change. I.P.Q. Publication, University of Poona.score: 210.0
     
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  21. Maria May Seitanidi, Dimitrios N. Koufopoulos & Paul Palmer (2010). Partnership Formation for Change: Indicators for Transformative Potential in Cross Sector Social Partnerships. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):139 - 161.score: 198.0
    We provide a grounded model for analysing formation in cross sector social partnerships to understand why business and nonprofit organizations increasingly partner to address social issues. Our model introduces organizational characteristics, organizational motives and history of partner interactions as critical factors that indicate the potential for social change. We argue that organizational characteristics, motives and the history of interactions indicate transformative capacity, transformative intention and transformative experience, respectively. Together, these three factors consist of a framework that (...)
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  22. Stephen Charles Mott (1982). Biblical Ethics and Social Change. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    This scholarly synthesis of biblical studies and Christian social ethics is designed to provide a biblical argument for intentional institutional change on behalf of social justice. Stephen Charles Mott provides a biblical and ethical guide on ways to implement that change. The first part of the book, providing the biblical theology of intentional social change, deals with the central concepts in biblical and theological ethics: grace, evil, love, justice, and the Reign of God. Christian (...)
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  23. W. Garrett Mitchener (2011). A Mathematical Model of Prediction-Driven Instability: How Social Structure Can Drive Language Change. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (3):385-396.score: 192.0
    I discuss a stochastic model of language learning and change. During a syntactic change, each speaker makes use of constructions from two different idealized grammars at variable rates. The model incorporates regularization in that speakers have a slight preference for using the dominant idealized grammar. It also includes incrementation: The population is divided into two interacting generations. Children can detect correlations between age and speech. They then predict where the population’s language is moving and speak according to that (...)
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  24. Clodia Vurro, M. Tina Dacin & Francesco Perrini (2010). Institutional Antecedents of Partnering for Social Change: How Institutional Logics Shape Cross—Sector Social Partnerships. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):39 - 53.score: 192.0
    Heeding the call for a deeper understanding of how cross-sector social partnerships (CSSPs) can be managed across different contexts, this article integrates ideas from institutional theory with current debate on cross-boundary collaboration. Adopting the point of view of business actors interested in forming a CSSP to address complex social problems, we suggest that "appropriateness" needs shape business approaches toward partnering for social change, exerting an impact on the benefits that can be gained from it. A theoretical (...)
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  25. Lisa Sowle Cahill (2003). Bioethics, Theology, and Social Change. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (3):363 - 398.score: 186.0
    Recent years have witnessed a concern among theological bioethicists that secular debate has grown increasingly "thin," and that "thick" religious traditions and their spokespersons have been correspondingly excluded. This essay disputes that analysis. First, religious and theological voices compete for public attention and effectiveness with the equally "thick" cultural traditions of modern science and market capitalism. The distinctive contribution of religion should be to emphasize social justice in access to the benefits of health care, challenging the for-profit global marketing (...)
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  26. Davina Cooper (2001). Against the Current: Social Pathways and the Pursuit of Enduring Change. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (2):119-148.score: 186.0
    Radical innovations and practices frequentlyfind themselves in an inhospitable environment,struggling against the gravitational force ofdominant norms, practices and relations. Thispaper explores the problems radical changeconfronts in its attempts to become sustainable.Against the postmodern valorisation of thetransient and ephemeral, the paper argues forthe importance of routinisation and repetitionin the process of creating and sustainingchange. A metaphor of social pathways isdeveloped to explore how new routines arecreated through de jure (governance) andde facto (usage) means. The paper arguesthat, in contrast to governance, (...)
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  27. Peter Richerson, Evolution: The Darwinian Theory of Social Change, an Homage to Donald T. Campbell.score: 180.0
    One of the earliest and most influential papers applying Darwinian theory to human cultural evolution was Donald T. Campbell’s paper “Variation and Selective Retention in Sociocultural Systems.” Campbell’s programmatic essay appeared as a chapter in a book entitled Social Change in Developing Areas (Barringer et al., 1965). It sketched a very ambitious project to apply Darwinian principles to the study of the evolution of human behavior. His essential theses were four.
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  28. Ann Ferguson (1997). Moral Responsibility and Social Change: A New Theory of Self. Hypatia 12 (3):116-141.score: 180.0
    The aim of this essay is to rethink classic issues of freedom and moral responsibility in the context of feminist and antiracist theories of male and white domination. If personal identities are socially constructed by gender, race and ethnicity, class and sexual orientation, how are social change and moral responsibility possible? An aspects theory of selfhood and three reinterpretations of identity politics show how individuals are morally responsible and nonessentialist ways to resist social oppression.
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  29. Elwyn Thomas (1990). Filial Piety, Social Change and Singapore Youth. Journal of Moral Education 19 (3):192-205.score: 180.0
    Abstract This paper examines adolescent perceptions of filial piety mainly from a psychological perspective. An attempt is made to explain why Singapore youth appear to hold the principal tenets of filiality in such high regard while newer perceptions of filial piety are also emerging among them. In spite of an ever increasing presence of modernization in Singapore, its youth continue to respect one of the most cardinal of Chinese virtues namely filial piety. This respect however, is becoming more tentative as (...)
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  30. Michael D. Kennedy (2004). Evolution and Event in History and Social Change: Gerhard Lenski's Critical Theory. Sociological Theory 22 (2):315-327.score: 180.0
    Authors have contrasted social change and history many times, especially in terms of the significance of the event in accounting for the broadest contours of human societies' evolution. After recasting Gerhard Lenski's ecological-evolutionary theory in a critical fashion, by emphasizing its engagement with alternativity and by introducing a different approach to structure, I reconsider the salience of the event in the developmentalist project and suggest that ecological-evolutionary theory can be quite helpful in posing new questions about an eventful (...)
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  31. A. K. Saran (1963). The Marxian Theory of Social Change. Inquiry 6 (1-4):70 – 128.score: 180.0
    This essay is a logico?philosophical critique of the Marxian system of sociology with special reference to the theory of social change. To every change in the natural order (taken in conjunction with the technological order) corresponds an appropriate change in the human order, that is, in the system of social relations. This, it is shown, is the fundamental Marxian thesis regarding social equilibrium. And accordingly the key idea regarding social change is that (...)
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  32. Marvin B. Scott (1966). Functional Foibles and the Analysis of Social Change. Inquiry 9 (1-4):205 – 214.score: 180.0
    Functional analysis is the major theoretical perspective of contemporary sociology. Although many fruitful studies of social structure have resulted from the application of this perspective, it has been notably sterile in coping with questions of social change. Two major shortcomings of the functionalist view of change are here examined. The first type of shortcoming might be called 'evolutionary hangovers'. Under this heading we may include 'functional ahistoricism' and a 'commitment to progress'. The second major shortcoming refers (...)
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  33. Janet K. Harrison (1991). Orchestrating Social Change: An Imperative in Care of the Chronically Ill. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (3):343-359.score: 180.0
    The ethical challenges of caring for the chronically ill are of increasing concern to nurses as they attempt to create humanitarian environments for long-term care. This article suggests two ethical perspectives to guide the agenda of the nursing profession to achieve social change in the care of the chronically ill and aging. First, a reemphasis on the public duties of the professions is recommended which extends beyond serving the interests of the nursing profession to recognizing the need to (...)
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  34. Richard Landes, Andrew Gow & David Van Meter (eds.) (2003). The Apocalyptic Year 1000: Religious Expectation and Social Change, 950-1050. OUP USA.score: 180.0
    The essays in this book challenge prevailing views on the way in which apocalyptic concerns contributed to larger processes of social change at the first millennium. Several basic questions unify the essays: What chronological and theological assumptions underlay apocalyptic and millennial speculations around the Year 1000? How broadly disseminated were those speculations? Can we speak of a mentality of apocalyptic hopes and anxieties on the eve of the millennium? If so, how did authorities respond to or even contribute (...)
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  35. Elizabeth Levy Paluck (2012). The Dominance of the Individual in Intergroup Relations Research: Understanding Social Change Requires Psychological Theories of Collective and Structural Phenomena. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):33-34.score: 180.0
    Dixon et al. suggest that the psychological literature on intergroup relations should shift from theorizing to A focus on social change exposes the importance of psychological theories involving collective phenomena like social norms and institutions. Individuals' attitudes and emotions may follow, rather than cause, changes in social norms and institutional arrangements.
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  36. P. A. Roth & J. K. Harrison (1991). Orchestrating Social Change: An Imperative in Care of the Chronically Ill. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (3):343-359.score: 180.0
    The ethical challenges of caring for the chronically ill are of increasing concern to nurses as they attempt to create humanitarian environments for long-term care. This article suggests two ethical perspectives to guide the agenda of the nursing profession to achieve social change in the care of the chronically ill and aging. First, a reemphasis on the public duties of the professions is recommended which extends beyond serving the interests of the nursing profession to recognizing the need to (...)
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  37. A. Davis (1997). Selected Ethical Issues in Planned Social Change and Primary Health Care. Nursing Ethics 4 (3):239-244.score: 180.0
    This paper discusses two interrelated concepts: (1) the ethics of planned social change and (2) primary health care. It takes the World Health Organization’s definition of primary health care as a point of departure to examine four identified potential areas where ethical dilemmas may occur. In addition, questions are raised about nursing education, as well as about the class and status differences between nurses and patients and communities. It takes the position that our first task is to encourage (...)
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  38. Jacob Freeman & John M. Anderies (2012). Intensification, Tipping Points, and Social Change in a Coupled Forager-Resource System. Human Nature 23 (4):419-446.score: 180.0
    This paper presents a stylized bioeconomic model of hunter-gatherer foraging effort designed to study the process of intensification on open-access resources. A critical insight derived from the model is that the very success of an adaptation at the level of an individual forager group can create system-level vulnerabilities that subsequently feed back to cause emergent social change. The model illustrates how the intensification of harvest time by individuals within a habitat creates a forager-resource system that becomes vulnerable to (...)
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  39. Johan Galtung & Sohail Inayatullah (eds.) (1997). Macrohistory and Macrohistorians: Perspectives on Individual, Social, and Civilizational Change. Praeger.score: 180.0
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  40. Alfonso Montuori (1997). Conservatism, Creativity and Social Change: David Loye's Dialogical Perspective. World Futures 49 (1):19-30.score: 180.0
    (1997). Conservatism, creativity and social change: David Loye's dialogical perspective. World Futures: Vol. 49, The Dialatic of Evolution: Essays in Honor of David Loye, pp. 19-30.
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  41. Rebecca Tarlau (2014). From a Language to a Theory of Resistance: Critical Pedagogy, the Limits of “Framing,” and Social Change. Educational Theory 64 (4):369-392.score: 180.0
    In this article, Rebecca Tarlau attempts to build a more robust theory of the relationship between education and social change by drawing on the conceptual tools offered in the critical pedagogy and social movement literatures. Tarlau argues that while critical pedagogy has been largely disconnected from its roots in political organizing, social movement literature has shifted away from a theory of educational processes within movement building. Specifically, she suggests that the currently dominant “framing perspective” in the (...)
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  42. Erika Summers-Effler (2002). The Micro Potential for Social Change: Emotion, Consciousness, and Social Movement Formation. Sociological Theory 20 (1):41-60.score: 174.0
    Can one explain both the resilience of the status quo and the possibility for resistance from a subordinate position? This paper aims to resolve these seemingly incompatible perspectives. By extending Randall Collins's interaction ritual theory, and synthesizing it with Norbert Wiley's model of the self, this paper suggests how the emotional dynamics between people and within the self can explain social inertia as well as the possibility for resistance and change. Diverging from literature on the sociology of emotions (...)
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  43. Simon Caney (2014). Climate Change, Intergenerational Equity and the Social Discount Rate. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (4):320-342.score: 174.0
    Climate change is projected to have very severe impacts on future generations. Given this, any adequate response to it has to consider the nature of our obligations to future generations. This paper seeks to do that and to relate this to the way that inter-generational justice is often framed by economic analyses of climate change. To do this the paper considers three kinds of considerations that, it has been argued, should guide the kinds of actions that one generation (...)
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  44. Steven E. Wallis (2014). Abstraction and Insight: Building Better Conceptual Systems to Support More Effective Social Change. Foundations of Science 19 (4):353-362.score: 174.0
    When creating theory to understand or implement change at the social and/or organizational level, it is generally accepted that part of the theory building process includes a process of abstraction. While the process of abstraction is well understood, it is not so well understood how abstractions “fit” together to enable the creation of better theory. Starting with a few simple ideas, this paper explores one way we work with abstractions. This exploration challenges the traditionally held importance of abstracting (...)
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  45. Alan G. Gross (2010). Systematically Distorted Communication: An Impediment to Social and Political Change. Informal Logic 30 (4).score: 174.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} I define and refine Habermas’s notion of systematically distorted communication by means of focused, structured comparison among three of its instances. Next, I show that its critique is possible within the confines of his theory by recourse to (...)
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  46. Mary Flanagan (2006). Making Games for Social Change. AI and Society 20 (4):493-505.score: 174.0
    This paper provides an overview of creating games for change from within an academic context, focusing specifically on the development of educational computer games for middle school girls. The essay addresses larger issues such as the cultural importance of computer games, the difficulty in categorizing a diverse user group such as “girls,” and the ways in which one could design game goals to promote diverse play and learning styles. Through such alternate design strategies, both media makers and students can (...)
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  47. Katharina Breckner (2006). Russian Philosophers on Continuous Creation as the Basis for Social Change. Studies in East European Thought 58 (4):271 - 297.score: 168.0
    Vladimir Solov’ëv, Sergej Bulgakov, Nikolaj Berdjaev, and Semën Frank shared the conviction that Creation is incomplete: humanity must arrive at organizing social life on an “eighth day.” Thus they prophesied the Universal Church, “social Christianity,” “personalist socialism,” and “spiritual democracy.” Their attempt to avoid any illegitimate confusion between independent rational thought and Christian faith prompted Bulgakov to become an ordained theologian, Berdjaev a “philosophical poet,” and Frank a “Christian realist.” Solov’ëv’s theosophical attempt to philosophically substantiate faith and consequently (...)
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  48. Ivana Spasic (2008). Political Change in Serbia in the Perspective of Social Learning: An Idea Revisited. Filozofija I Društvo 19 (3):89-108.score: 168.0
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  49. Michael Lewis, A. Martin Wall & Justin Aronfreed (1963). Developmental Change in the Relative Values of Social and Non-Social Reinforcement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (2):133.score: 168.0
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  50. Julia Frost Nerbonne & Ralph Lentz (2003). Rooted in Grass: Challenging Patterns of Knowledge Exchange as a Means of Fostering Social Change in a Southeast Minnesota Farm Community. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 20 (1):65-78.score: 164.0
    By convening a multidisciplinary team(the Monitoring Team) that included farmers,university and agency researchers, andnon-profit staff; a small group of farmers insoutheast Minnesota, U.S.A., bolstered thelegitimacy of the sustainable agriculturemovement. Through the experience of forming ateam and working with individuals who operatedwithin the mainstream knowledge paradigm,farmers gained validation of their knowledgeabout farming, while researchers came to valuealternative knowledge systems. In the contextof a socially embedded movement, farmers wereempowered by sharing their knowledge withresearchers, and ultimately contributed to thesustainable agriculture movement by challengingtraditional (...)
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