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  1. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). Book Review: Mariam Fraser. Identity Without Selfhood: Bisexuality and Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (3):161-163.
  2. Talia Mae Bettcher (2009). Trans Identities and First-Person Authority. In Laurie Shrage (ed.), You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Oxford University Press.
  3. Susan T. Brison (1993). Surviving Sexual Violence: A Philosophical Perspective. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):5-22.
  4. Eloise A. Buker (1999). Is the Postmodern Self a Feminised Citizen? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (1):80-99.
  5. Sue Campbell (1997). Women, "False" Memory, and Personal Identity. Hypatia 12 (2):51 - 82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  6. Jane Caputi (2001). On the Lap of Necessity: A Mythic Reading of Teresa Brennan's Energetics Philosophy. Hypatia 16 (2):1-26.
    : In several works Teresa Brennan examines how, contrary to social notions of the separate and contained self, all that exists in the natural world is connected energetically. She identifies a "foundational fantasy" whereby the ego comes into existence and is maintained by the notion that it controls the mother. The effects of this fantasy are socially oppressive and, in the technological era, environmentally disastrous. My examination of narratives and images in ancient myth, popular culture, literature, and art suggest ways (...)
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  7. Marie Carrière (2006). Feminism as a Radical Ethics? Questions for Feminist Researchers in the Humanities. Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):245-260.
    A feminist perspective on selfhood – bound to a perspective on otherness – is the main concern of this article. The resonance of this notion of selfhood both with ethical philosophy and with the language of humanism enables a deeper understanding of a feminist ethics as well as its internal tensions. The article considers the relationship of feminism and humanism as one of “paradoxical fluidity” rather than antithetical polarization, to explore the ways in which feminism’s alliance with contemporary ethics exemplifies (...)
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  8. Ann Ferguson (1997). Moral Responsibility and Social Change: A New Theory of Self. Hypatia 12 (3):116-141.
    The aim of this essay is to rethink classic issues of freedom and moral responsibility in the context of feminist and antiracist theories of male and white domination. If personal identities are socially constructed by gender, race and ethnicity, class and sexual orientation, how are social change and moral responsibility possible? An aspects theory of selfhood and three reinterpretations of identity politics show how individuals are morally responsible and nonessentialist ways to resist social oppression.
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  9. Lauren Freeman (2011). Reconsidering Relational Autonomy: A Feminist Approach to Selfhood and the Other in the Thinking of Martin Heidegger. Inquiry 54 (4):361-383.
    Abstract This paper examines a convergence between Heidegger's reconceptualization of subjectivity and intersubjectivity and some recent work in feminist philosophy on relational autonomy. Both view the concept of autonomy to be misguided, given that our capacity to be self-directed is dependent upon our ability to enter into and sustain meaningful relationships. Both attempt to overturn the notion of a subject as an isolated, atomistic individual and to show that selfhood requires, and is based upon, one's relation to and dependence upon (...)
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  10. Stéphanie Genz (2009). Postfemininities in Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Addressing the contradictions surrounding modern-day femininity and its complicated relationship with feminism and postfeminism, this book examines a range of popular female/feminist icons and paradigms. It offers an innovative and forward-looking perspective on femininity and the modern female self.
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  11. Morwenna Griffiths (1995). Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity. Routledge.
    Feminisms and the Self is both a critique and a construction of feminist philosophy, bringing an original contribution to the current debate surrounding identity and subjectivity. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  12. Susan Hekman (1999). Identity Crises: Identity, Identity Politics, and Beyond. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (1).
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  13. Leslie A. Howe (2003). Athletics, Embodiment, and the Appropriation of the Self. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (2):92-107.
    The paper argues that authentic human selfhood requires the adequate integration of bodily awareness into the self-conception of self, and that a highly significant contributor to this process is athletic activity (sports). The role of athletics in self-integration is examined from phenomenological and moral-political standpoints, and it is argued that, although athletic activity's inherent goal of realizing ontological unity through embodied intentionality is ideally suited to this task, the organization of sport too frequently thwarts this purpose, either through exclusion of (...)
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  14. Leslie A. Howe (1994). Kierkegaard and the Feminine Self. Hypatia 9 (4):131-157.
    Kierkegaard shows two contrary attitudes to woman and the feminine: misogyny and celebration. The Kierkegaardian structure of selfhood, because combined with a hierarchical assumption about the relative value of certain human characteristics, and their identification as male or female, argues that woman is a lesser self. Consequently, the claim that the Kierkegaardian ideal of selfhood is androgynist is rejected, though it is the latter assumptions alone that force this conclusion.
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  15. Ada S. Jaarsma (2011). Kierkegaard, Metaphysics and Political Theory: Unfinished Selves. By Aliston Assiter . New York: Continuum, 2009. The Neither/Nor of the Second Sex: Kierkegaard on Women, Sexual Difference, and Sexual Relations. By CÉline LÉon . Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 2008. Irigaray and Kierkegaard: On the Construction of the Self. By Helen Tallon Russell . Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 2009. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (3):922-928.
  16. Marguerite la Caze (2008). Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others’ experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people’s greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young’s articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
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  17. Flo Leibowitz (2003). "Images" of the Female and of the Self: Two Recent Interpretations by Women Authors. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (4):283 - 291.
  18. Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.) (2000). Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Automony, Agency, and the Social Self. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of original essays explores the social and relational dimensions of individual autonomy. Rejecting the feminist charge that autonomy is inherently masculinist, the contributors draw on feminist critiques of autonomy to challenge and enrich contemporary philosophical debates about agency, identity, and moral responsibility. The essays analyze the complex ways in which oppression can impair an agent's capacity for autonomy, and investigate connections, neglected by standard accounts, between autonomy and other aspects of the agent, including self-conception, self-worth, memory, and the (...)
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  19. Margaret A. McLaren (1999). Two Feminist Views on the Self, Identity and Collective Action. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (1):120 - 125.
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  20. Lois McNay (1992/1993). Foucault and Feminism: Power, Gender, and the Self. Northeastern University Press.
  21. Eduardo Mendieta (2000). Educating the Political Imaginary. Hypatia 15 (3):163-173.
    : María Pía Lara's two books, La Democracia como proyecto de identidad ética and Moral Textures: Feminist Narratives in the Public Sphere are described and analyzed. Her contribution to a feminist left-Habermasian theory of the relationship between the aesthetic dimension and the political imaginary are discussed. Questions and concerns, however, are raised regarding the assumptions of universal pragmatics and Lara's attempt to offer a positive reading of the dependence of the political imaginary on literary acts and genres.
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  22. Diana T. Meyers (2005). Who's There? Selfhood, Self-Regard, and Social Relations. Hypatia 20 (4):200-215.
    : J. David Velleman develops a canny, albeit mentalistic, theory of selfhood that furnishes some insights feminist philosophers should heed but that does not adequately heed some of the insights feminist philosophers have developed about the embodiment and relationality of the self. In my view, reflexivity cannot do the whole job of accounting for selfhood, for it rests on an unduly sharp distinction between reflexive loci of understanding and value, on the one hand, and embodiment and relationality, on the other. (...)
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  23. Diana T. Meyers (ed.) (1997). Feminists Rethink the Self. Westview Press.
    How is women’s conception of self affected by the caregiving responsibilities traditionally assigned to them and by the personal vulnerabilities imposed on them? If institutions of male dominance profoundly influence women’s lives and minds, how can women form judgments about their own best interests and overcome oppression? Can feminist politics survive in face of the diversity of women’s experience, which is shaped by race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, as well as by gender? Exploring such questions, leading feminist thinkers have (...)
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  24. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2012). The Politics of Persons: Individual Autonomy and Socio-Historical Selves. By John Christman. Hypatia 27 (1):227-230.
  25. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2008). Personal Autonomy in Society (Review). Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 202-206.
  26. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2004). Being Yourself: Essays on Identity, Action, and Social Life. rowman & littlefield.
    A collection of some of my previously published papers with an introduction and a new chapter.
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  27. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2003). Frontiers of Individuality: Embodiment and Relationships in Cultural Context. History and Theory 42 (2):271–285.
  28. Diane Negra (2009). What a Girl Wants?: Fantasizing the Reclamation of Self in Postfeminism. Routledge.
    Introduction -- Postfeminism, family values, and the social fantasy of the hometown -- Time crisis and the new postfeminist life cycle -- Postfeminist working girls : new archetypes of the female labor market -- Hyperdomesticity, self-care and the well-lived life in postfeminism.
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  29. Mariana Ortega (2001). "New Mestizas," "'World'-Travelers," and "Dasein": Phenomenology and the Multi-Voiced, Multi-Cultural Self. Hypatia 16 (3):1 - 29.
    The aim of this essay is to carry out an analysis of the multi-voiced, multi-cultural self discussed by Latina feminists in light of a Heideggerian phenomenological account of persons or "Existential Analytic." In so doing, it (a) points out similarities as well as differences between the Heideggerian description of the self and Latina feminists' phenomenological accounts of self, and (b) critically assesses María Lugones's important notion of "world-traveling." In the end, the essay defends the view of a "multiplicitous" self which (...)
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  30. Jennifer Radden (1996). Relational Individualism and Feminist Therapy. Hypatia 11 (3):71 - 96.
    My aim here is to clarify the practice of honoring and validating the relational model of self which plays an important role in feminist therapy. This practice rests on a tangle of psychological claims, moral and political values, and mental health norms which require analysis. Also, severe pathology affects the relative "relationality" of the self. By understanding it we can better understand the senses of autonomy compatible with and even required for a desired relationality.
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  31. Erin C. Tarver (2011). New Forms of Subjectivity: Theorizing the Relational Self with Foucault and Alcoff. Hypatia 26 (4):804-825.
    Taking seriously Linda Martín Alcoff's suggestion that we reevaluate the extent to which poststructuralist articulations of the subject are truly socially constituted, as well as the centrality of Latina identity to her own account of such constitution, I argue that the discussion Alcoff and other Latina feminists offer of the experience of being Latina in North America is illustrative of the extent to which the relational and globally situated constitution of subjects needs further development in many social-constructionist accounts of selfhood. (...)
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  32. Erin C. Tarver (2011). Rethinking Intersectionality: Michelle Obama, Presumed Subjects and Constitutive Privilege. PhiloSOPHIA 1 (2):150-172.
  33. Allison Weir (1996). Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity. Routledge.
    Contemporary feminist theory is at an impasse: the project of reformulating concepts of self and social identity is thwarted by an association between identity and oppression and victimhood. In Sacrificial Logics, Allison Weir proposes a way out of this impasse through a concept of identity which depends on accepting difference. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational" feminists like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist feminists like (...)
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