Search results for 'Trait' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shane Connelly, Whitney Helton-Fauth & Michael D. Mumford (2004). A Managerial in-Basket Study of the Impact of Trait Emotions on Ethical Choice. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (3):245-267.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the relationship of various trait emotions to the ethical choices of 189 college students who completed a managerial decision-making task as part of an in-basket exercise in a laboratory setting. Prior research regarding emotion influences on ethical decision-making and linkages between emotions and cognition informed hypotheses about how different types of emotions impact ethical choices. Findings supported our expectations that positive and negative emotions classified as active would be more strongly related to interpersonally-directed ethical choices than (...)
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  2. Adriyani Sahidi & P. Tommy Y. S. Suyasa (2010). Hubungan Trait Kepribadian Sikap Terhadap Sistem Penilaian Kinerja (Studi Pada Pengemudi Bus Transjakarta). Phronesis 9 (2).score: 18.0
    The research aim was to find out whether the personality trait that using the big five personality factors were significantly and positively correlated with attitude toward performance appraisal system. Method for this research is quantitative and non experimental with correlation research design. A hundred ten (110) TransJakarta bus drivers who have worked minimum for a year, completed the big five scale NEO PI-R and the attitude toward performance appraisal system scale. Among the big five personality facet level, two aspects (...)
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  3. Stanley B. Klein (2013). Klein and Loftus's Model of Trait Self-Knowledge: The Importance of Familiarizing Oneself with the Foundational Research Prior to Reading About its Neuropsychological Applications. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Klein and Loftus's model of trait self-knowledge: the importance of familiarizing oneself with the foundational research prior to reading about its neuropsychological applications.
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  4. Michelle Dalton, John Blundell & Graham Stuart Finlayson (2013). Examination of Food Reward and Energy Intake Under Laboratory and Free-Living Conditions in a Trait Binge Eating Subtype of Obesity. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Background/Aims: Trait binge eating has been proposed as a ‘hedonic subtype’ of obesity characterised by enhanced food liking and wanting, and a preference for high-fat sweet foods in the laboratory. The current study examined the influence of trait binge eating in overweight or obese women on eating behaviour under laboratory and free-living conditions over a 48-hour period. Methods: In a matched pairs design, 24 overweight or obese females (BMI: 30.30 ± 2.60kg/m2; Age: 25.42 ± 3.65yrs) with high or (...)
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  5. Christian Geiser, Jacob Bishop, Ginger Lockhart, Saul Shiffman & Jerry L. Grenard (2013). Analyzing Latent State-Trait and Multiple-Indicator Latent Growth Curve Models as Multilevel Structural Equation Models. Frontiers in Psychology 4:975.score: 18.0
    Latent state-trait (LST) and latent growth curve (LGC) models are frequently used in the analysis of longitudinal data. Although it is well-known that standard single-indicator LGC models can be analyzed within either the structural equation modeling (SEM) or multilevel (ML; hierarchical linear modeling) frameworks, few researchers realize that LST and multivariate LGC models, which use multiple indicators at each time point, can also be specified as ML models. In the present paper, we demonstrate that using the ML-SEM rather than (...)
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  6. Tessa Marzi, Antonio Regina & Stefania Righi (2014). Emotions Shape Memory Suppression in Trait Anxiety. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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  7. Christian Miller (forthcoming). The Mixed Trait Model of Character Traits and the Moral Domains of Fairness and Stealing. In , Character: New Directions from Philosophy, Psychology, and Theology. Oxford University Press.score: 14.0
    In this paper my goal is to extend my earlier discussion, at least in a preliminary way, to two additional areas – fairness and stealing. In doing so, I will consider whether the existing research is compatible with my Mixed Trait model, or whether instead it gives me reason to be concerned with how broadly applicable the model really is. My conclusion will be that the results are, so to speak, a mixed bag. With respect to fairness research, some (...)
     
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  8. Gopal Sreenivasan (2002). Errors About Errors: Virtue Theory and Trait Attribution. Mind 111 (441):47-68.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the implications of certain social psychological experiments for moral theory—specifically, for virtue theory. Gilbert Harman and John Doris have recently argued that the empirical evidence offered by ‘situationism’ demonstrates that there is no such thing as a character trait. I dispute this conclusion. My discussion focuses on the proper interpretation of the experimental data—the data themselves I grant for the sake of argument. I develop three criticisms of the anti-trait position. Of these, the central criticism (...)
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  9. Richard A. Depue & Jeannine V. Morrone-Strupinsky (2005). A Neurobehavioral Model of Affiliative Bonding: Implications for Conceptualizing a Human Trait of Affiliation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):313-350.score: 12.0
    Because little is known about the human trait of affiliation, we provide a novel neurobehavioral model of affiliative bonding. Discussion is organized around processes of reward and memory formation that occur during approach and consummatory phases of affiliation. Appetitive and consummatory reward processes are mediated independently by the activity of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA)–nucleus accumbens shell (NAS) pathway and the central corticolimbic projections of the u-opiate system of the medial basal arcuate nucleus, respectively, although these two (...)
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  10. John L. Locke (2008). The Trait of Human Language: Lessons From the Canal Boat Children of England. Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):347-361.score: 12.0
    To fully understand human language, an evolved trait that develops in the young without formal instruction, it must be possible to observe language that has not been influenced by instruction. But in modern societies, much of the language that is used, and most of the language that is measured, is confounded by literacy and academic training. This diverts empirical attention from natural habits of speech, causing theorists to miss critical features of linguistic practice. To dramatize this point, I examine (...)
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  11. Martina Manns (2005). The Riddle of Nature and Nurture – Lateralization has an Epigenetic Trait. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):602-603.score: 12.0
    Vallortigara & Rogers's (V&R's) proposal that directional asymmetries evolved under social pressures raises questions about the ontogenetic mechanisms subserving the alignment of asymmetries in a population. Neuro-ontogenetic principles suggest that epigenetic factors are decisively involved in the determination of individual lateralization and that genetic factors align their direction. Clearly, directional asymmetry has an epigenetic trait.
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  12. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One is Called: On the Relation Between Traits and Trait-Terms in Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.score: 12.0
    Despite the recent surge of interest in Nietzsche’s moral psychology and his conceptions of character and virtue in particular, little attention has been paid to his treatment of the relation between character traits and the terms that designate them. In this paper, I argue for an interpretation of this relation: Nietzsche thinks there is a looping effect between the psychological disposition named by a character trait-term and the practice of using that term.
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  13. Eldad Yechiam & Eyal Ert (2011). Risk Attitude in Decision Making: In Search of Trait-Like Constructs. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):166-186.score: 12.0
    We evaluate the consistency of different constructs affecting risk attitude in individuals’ decisions across different levels of risk. Specifically, we contrast views suggesting that risk attitude is a single primitive construct with those suggesting it consists of multiple latent components. Additionally, we evaluate such constructs as sensitivity to losses, diminishing sensitivity to increases in payoff, sensitivity to variance, and risk acceptance (the willingness to accept probable outcomes over certainty). In search of trait-like constructs, the paper reviews experimental results focusing (...)
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  14. Hans-Rolf Gregorius (2011). The Analysis of Association Between Traits When Differences Between Trait States Matter. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (3):213-229.score: 12.0
    Because of their elementary significance in almost all fields of science, measures of association between two variables or traits are abundant and multiform. One aspect of association that is of considerable interest, especially in population genetics and ecology, seems to be widely ignored. This aspect concerns association between complex traits that show variable and arbitrarily defined state differences. Among such traits are genetic characters controlled by many and potentially polyploid loci, species characteristics, and environmental variables, all of which may be (...)
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  15. Sergio M. Pellis (2002). When is a Trait an Adaptation? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):524-524.score: 12.0
    The authors outline research strategies that may identify the possible adaptive value of a trait. But this does not solve the problem of how to decide which characteristics of living organisms require an adaptive explanation. I suggest that knowledge of the ontogenetic and phylogenetic construction of a trait facilitates the identification of features that may have been acted on by natural selection.
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  16. Andrew S. Fox, Trait-Like Brain Activity During Adolescence Predicts Anxious Temperament in Primates.score: 12.0
    Early theorists (Freud and Darwin) speculated that extremely shy children, or those with anxious temperament, were likely to have anxiety problems as adults. More recent studies demonstrate that these children have heightened responses to potentially threatening situations reacting with intense defensive responses that are characterized by behavioral inhibition (BI) (inhibited motor behavior and decreased vocalizations) and physiological arousal. Confirming the earlier impressions, data now demonstrate that children with this disposition are at increased risk to develop anxiety, depression, and comorbid substance (...)
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  17. Sean A. Valles (2013). Validity and Utility in Biological Traits. Biological Theory 8 (1):93-102.score: 12.0
    Trait” is a ubiquitous term in biology, but its precise meaning and theoretical foundations remain opaque. After distinguishing between “trait” and “character,” I argue for the value of adopting Theodosius Dobzhansky’s 1956 definition and framework for understanding “trait,” which holds that traits are just “semantic devices” that artificially impose order on continuous biological phenomena. I elaborate on this definition to distinguish between trait validity (compliance with Dobzhansky’s trait definition) and trait utility (usefulness of a (...)
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  18. Inri K. Almesa, Maria T. Widyastuti & Mardiana (2010). Kompetensi Interpersonal Pada Manajer Level Operasional (Ditinjau Dari Teori Trait Kepribadian Big-Five). Phronesis 9 (1).score: 12.0
    The aim of this research is to find the operating level manager’s interpersonal competence (based on big-five personality trait theory). The total subjects of this research are 139 operating level managers. The subjects of this research are divided by the big-five personality trait, such as openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. Researcher used questionnaire which is based on Likert scale to collect the data of this research. The data was analyzed by descriptive statistics with SPSS program (...)
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  19. Michael Glassman & Cynthia K. Buettner (2005). The Role of Trait Affiliation in Human Community. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):354-354.score: 12.0
    This commentary speaks to the relationship between Depue & Marrone-Strupinsky's (D&M-S's) concept of trait affiliation and affiliative memory and the formation of human community, especially among peer groups. The target article suggests a model for how and why dynamic communities form in a number of disparate contexts and under a number of circumstances.
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  20. Thomas Dierks Philipp Homan, Jochen Kindler, Martinus Hauf, Sebastian Walther, Daniela Hubl (2013). Repeated Measurements of Cerebral Blood Flow in the Left Superior Temporal Gyrus Reveal Tonic Hyperactivity in Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations: A Possible Trait Marker. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
    Background: The left superior temporal gyrus (STG) has been suggested to play a key role in auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Eleven medicated subjects with schizophrenia and medication-resistant auditory verbal hallucinations and 19 healthy controls underwent perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling. Three additional repeated measurements were conducted in the patients. Patients underwent a treatment with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) between the first 2 measurements. The main outcome measure was the pooled cerebral blood flow (CBF), (...)
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  21. Laura D. Crocker, Wendy Heller, Jeffrey M. Spielberg, Stacie L. Warren, Keith Bredemeier, Bradley P. Sutton, Marie T. Banich & Gregory A. Miller (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Attentional Control Differentiate Trait and State Negative Affect. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 12.0
    The present research examined the hypothesis that cognitive processes are modulated differentially by trait and state negative affect (NA). Brain activation associated with trait and state NA was measured by fMRI during an attentional control task, the emotion-word Stroop. Performance on the task was disrupted only by state NA. Trait NA was associated with reduced activity in several regions, including a prefrontal area that has been shown to be involved in top-down, goal-directed attentional control. In contrast, state (...)
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  22. Frans van Peperstraten (2009). Displacement or Composition? Lyotard and Nancy on the Trait d'Union Between Judaism and Christianity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (1):29-46.score: 12.0
    In one of the essays in his recent book on Christianity, La déclosion (2005), Nancy discusses the relationship between Judaism and Christianity. Nancy opens this discussion with a reference to Lyotard’s book on this relationship: Un trait d’union (1993). Both Lyotard and Nancy examine a very early figure in the emergence of Christianity from Judaism—whereas Lyotard focuses on the epistles of Paul, Nancy reads the epistle of James. Lyotard concludes that the hyphen in the expression ‘Judeo-Christian’ actually conceals ‘the (...)
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  23. Jana Holtmann, Maike C. Herbort, Torsten Wüstenberg, Joram Soch, Sylvia Richter, Henrik Walter, Stefan Roepke & Björn H. Schott (2013). Trait Anxiety Modulates Fronto-Limbic Processing of Emotional Interference in Borderline Personality Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in 16 female, unmedicated (...)
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  24. Gregory A. Miller Laura D. Crocker, Wendy Heller, Jeffrey M. Spielberg, Stacie L. Warren, Keith Bredemeier, Bradley P. Sutton, Marie T. Banich (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Attentional Control Differentiate Trait and State Negative Affect. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 12.0
    The present research examined the hypothesis that cognitive processes are modulated differentially by trait and state negative affect (NA). Brain activation associated with trait and state NA was measured by fMRI during an attentional control task, the emotion-word Stroop. Performance on the task was disrupted only by state NA. Trait NA was associated with reduced activity in several regions, including a prefrontal area that has been shown to be involved in top-down, goal-directed attentional control. In contrast, state (...)
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  25. Manuela Maria Marin & Joydeep Bhattacharya (2013). Getting Into the Musical Zone: Trait Emotional Intelligence and Amount of Practice Predict Flow in Pianists. Frontiers in Psychology 4:853.score: 12.0
    Being ‘in flow’ or ‘in the zone’ is defined as an extremely focused state of consciousness which occurs during intense engagement in an activity. In general, flow has been linked to peak performances (high achievement) and feelings of intense pleasure and happiness. However, empirical research on flow in music performance is scarce, although it may offer novel insights into the question of why musicians engage in musical activities for extensive periods of time. Here, we focused on individual differences in a (...)
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  26. Jeffrey Valla, Jeffrey Maendel, Barbara Ganzel, Andrew Barsky & Matthew K. Belmonte (2013). Autistic Trait Interactions Underlie Sex-Dependent Facial Recognition Abilities in the Normal Population. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 12.0
    Autistic face processing difficulties are said to be either uniquely social or due to a piecemeal cognitive ‘style’. Co-morbidity of social deficits and piecemeal cognition in autism makes teasing apart these accounts difficult. These traits vary normally, and are more separable in the general population, suggesting another way to compare accounts. Participants completed the Autism Quotient survey of autistic traits, and one of three face recognition tests: full-face, eyes-only, or mouth-only. Social traits predicted performance in the full-face condition in both (...)
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  27. Jacob M. Vigil & Kamilla Venner (2012). Prejudicial Behavior: More Closely Linked to Homophilic Peer Preferences Than to Trait Bigotry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):38-39.score: 12.0
    We disagree with Dixon et al. by maintaining that prejudice is primarily rooted in aversive reactions toward out-group members. However, these reactions are not indicative of negative attributes, such as trait bigotry, but rather normative homophily for peers with similar perceived attributes. Cognitive biases such as stereotype threat perpetuate perceptions of inequipotential and subsequent discrimination, irrespective of individuals' personality characteristics.
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  28. Eric B. Schmidt (2007). The Parental Obligation to Expand a Child's Range of Open Futures When Making Genetic Trait Selections for Their Child. Bioethics 21 (4):191–197.score: 11.0
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  29. Gail Corrado (2012). Achievement is a Relation, Not a Trait: The Gravity of the Situation. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (6):587-601.score: 10.0
    Ability and achievement are not traits: they are relations. Mistaking traits for relations has a history even in science (our understanding of gravity). This mistake is possibly responsible for the lackluster performance of the results of our educational research when we have tried to use it to inform policy. It is particularly troublesome for interventions that target “children at risk.” The paper provides a quasi-formal outline of achievement as a relation and it then uses the outline to explain some problematic (...)
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  30. Bence Nanay (2010). A Modal Theory of Function. Journal of Philosophy 107 (8):412-431.score: 9.0
    The function of a trait token is usually defined in terms of some properties of other (past, present, future) tokens of the same trait type. I argue that this strategy is problematic, as trait types are (at least partly) individuated by their functional properties, which would lead to circularity. In order to avoid this problem, I suggest a way to define the function of a trait token in terms of the properties of the very same (...) token. To able to allow for the possibility of malfunctioning, some of these properties need to be modal ones: a function of a trait is to do F just in case its doing F would contribute to the inclusive fitness of the organism whose trait it is. Function attributions have modal force. Finally, I explore whether and how this theory of biological function could be modified to cover artifact function. (shrink)
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  31. Paul Sheldon Davies (2000). Malfunctions. Biology and Philosophy 15 (1):19-38.score: 9.0
    A persistent boast of the historical approach to functions is that functional properties are normative. The claim is that a token trait retains its functional status even when it is defective, diseased, or damaged and consequently unable to perform the relevant task. This is because historical functional categories are defined in terms of some sort of historical success -- success in natural selection, typically -- which imposes a norm upon the performance of descendent tokens. Descendents thus are supposed to (...)
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  32. Matthew C. Keller & Geoffrey Miller (2006). Resolving the Paradox of Common, Harmful, Heritable Mental Disorders: Which Evolutionary Genetic Models Work Best? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):385-404.score: 9.0
    Given that natural selection is so powerful at optimizing complex adaptations, why does it seem unable to eliminate genes (susceptibility alleles) that predispose to common, harmful, heritable mental disorders, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder? We assess three leading explanations for this apparent paradox from evolutionary genetic theory: (1) ancestral neutrality (susceptibility alleles were not harmful among ancestors), (2) balancing selection (susceptibility alleles sometimes increased fitness), and (3) polygenic mutation-selection balance (mental disorders reflect the inevitable mutational load on the thousands (...)
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  33. Lisa Gannett (1999). What's in a Cause?: The Pragmatic Dimensions of Genetic Explanations. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):349-373.score: 9.0
    The paper argues for a pragmatic account of genetic explanation. This is to say that when a disease or other trait is termed genetic, the reasons for singling out genes as causes over other, also necessary, genetic and nongenetic conditions are not wholly theoretical but include pragmatic dimensions. Whether the explanation is the presence of a trait in an individual or differences in a trait among individuals, genetic explanations are context-dependent in three ways: they are relative to (...)
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  34. Deborah L. Kidder (2005). Is It 'Who I Am', 'What I Can Get Away With', or 'What You've Done to Me'? A Multi-Theory Examination of Employee Misconduct. Journal of Business Ethics 57 (4):389 - 398.score: 9.0
    Research on detrimental workplace behaviors has increased recently, predominantly focusing on justice issues. Research from the integrity testing literature, which is grounded in trait theory, has not received as much attention in the management literature. Trait theory, agency theory, and psychological contracts theory each have different predictions about employee performance that is harmful to the organization. While on the surface they appear contradictory, this paper describes how each (...)
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  35. Ronald Sandler (2005). What Makes a Character Trait a Virtue? Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3-4):383-397.score: 9.0
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  36. James S. Uleman (1987). Consciousness and Control: The Case of Spontaneous Trait Inferences. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 13:337-54.score: 9.0
  37. James T. Lamiell (2000). A Periodic Table of Personality Elements? The "Big Five" and Trait "Psychology" in Critical Perspective. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):1-24.score: 9.0
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  38. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2004). Schizophrenia: A Benign Trait. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):859-860.score: 9.0
    While schizophrenia may be genetically determined up to a point, neither it nor its nearest relatives offer any sort of reproductive advantage to its sufferers. Instead, from an evolutionary point of view, schizophrenia is benign – it neither promotes nor inhibits survival to reproduction. Because it is benign, its rate of occurrence should remain fairly constant over time.
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  39. Degeng Wang (2005). “Molecular Gene”: Interpretation in the Right Context. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):453-464.score: 9.0
    How to interpret the “molecular gene” concept is discussed in this paper. I argue that the architecture of biological systems is hierarchical and multi-layered, exhibiting striking similarities to that of modern computers. Multiple layers exist between the genotype and system level property, the phenotype. This architectural complexity gives rise to the intrinsic complexity of the genotype-phenotype relationships. The notion of a gene being for a phenotypic trait or traits lacks adequate consideration of this complexity and has limitations in explaining (...)
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  40. Fitzgibbon Bernadette, Kirkovski Melissa, Green Amity, Eisenberger Naomi, Fitzgerald Paul & Enticott Peter (2013). An rTMS Study of Social Rejection: Effect of Trait Empathy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
  41. Elisa Gambetti & Fiorella Giusberti (2008). Dispositional Anger and Risk Decision-Making. Mind and Society 8 (1):7-20.score: 9.0
    In this study, we assessed the influence of trait anger on decisions in risky situations evaluating how it might interact with some contextual factors. One hundred and fifty-eight participants completed the Trait Anger scale of STAXI-2 (T-Ang) and an inventory consisting of a battery of hypothetical everyday decision-making scenarios, representative of three specific domains: financial, social and health. Participants were also asked to evaluate familiarity and salience for each scenario. This study provides evidence for a relationship between individual (...)
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  42. Elliott Sober (2013). Trait Fitness is Not a Propensity, but Fitness Variation Is. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):336-341.score: 9.0
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  43. Edmund D. Abegg (1972). The Trait-Dominance Theory of Historical Periodization. Journal of Critical Analysis 3 (4):188-198.score: 9.0
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  44. D. Turk, S. Cunningham & C. MaCrae (2008). Self-Memory Biases in Explicit and Incidental Encoding of Trait Adjectives. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1040-1045.score: 9.0
  45. Birgit Kellner (2001). Negation €“ Failure or Success? Remarks on an Allegedly Characteristic Trait of DharmakÄ«Rti's Anupalabdhi- Theory. Journal of Indian Philosophy 29 (5/6):495-517.score: 9.0
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  46. Robert Audi (2014). Faith as Attitude, Trait, and Virtue. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press. 327.score: 9.0
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  47. Alicia J. Hofelich & Stephanie D. Preston (2012). The Meaning in Empathy: Distinguishing Conceptual Encoding From Facial Mimicry, Trait Empathy, and Attention to Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):119-128.score: 9.0
  48. O. Fassler, S. Lynn & J. Knox (2008). Is Hypnotic Suggestibility a Stable Trait?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):240-253.score: 9.0
  49. Syrina Al Aïn, Arnaud Carré, Carole Fantini-Hauwel, Jean-Yves Baudouin & Chrystel Besche-Richard (2013). What is the Emotional Core of the Multidimensional Machiavellian Personality Trait? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 9.0
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  50. Thiago Gonçalves-Souza, Paula M. Omena, José César Souza & Gustavo Q. Romero (2008). Trait-Mediated Effects on Flowers: Artificial Spiders Deceive Pollinators and Decrease Plant Fitness. In Carolyn Merchant (ed.), Ecology. Humanity Books. 2407-2413.score: 9.0
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